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HEAD-QUARTERS, Q. M. GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT,

New Orleans, November 25, 1816. Sır: I have the satisfaction to inform you that I have succeeded in purchasing the steamship Alabama for $75,000, $15,000 less than was asked for her on the 5th instant. I heard, a few days ago, from the owners of the Southerner; they asked for that ship $180,000; that sum is $80,000 more than she is worth. The Alabama is worth the sum we have purchased her for. We would not have gotten her for that sum, had I not positively declined chartering her or any other large boat upon any terms that could be accepted. I had publicly declared that I would not pay for any steamer more than $7,000 per month.

Whatsoever may be the measures proposed by the government in Mexico, you may rest satisfied that iney shall be carried out so far as relates to this department.

I have this moment seen the Hon. Mr. La Sere, the member from this city, and have requested him to press upon the Post Office Department the absolute necessity of establishing an express mail to this city, and a line of mail steamers to Brazos San Iago, and other ports south of this city, which are now or may be occupied by the army. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

TH. S. JESUP,

Quartermaster General. Hon. W. L. MARCY,

Secretary of War, Washington city:

HEAD-QUARTERS, Q. M. GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT,

New Orleans, November 26, 1846. SIR: I succeeded yesterday in purchasing the steamer Fashion for $15,000. We have now sufficient steam transports for any operations the government may order; and there are at this city and Brazos San Iago sutficient camp equipage, wagons, and harness for the use of any number of troops ihat will probably be employed. Mules for draught and packing can be obtained in Mexico, if the proper measures be taken, in any numbers that may be required. The authority of the general, however, will be necessary to enable the officers of the quartermaster's department to collect them.

I respectfully submit for the consideration of the War Department the propriety of permitting citizens of the United States, as posts are taken and occupied by our troops on the gulf, to enter with merchandise for the purpose of trading with the Mexicans. All articles that could be used against us in war might be prohibited. If the sale of tobacco, dry goods, &c., were permitted, the disbursing officers in Mexico could obtain, either for treasury notes or drafts, all the specie they would require there, without the expense or risk of transporting it thither; anid we could often conmand the resources of the country in labor and means of transportation through our merchants, when the people of the country would be afraid 10 deal directly with public officers. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

TH. S. JESUP,

Quartermaster General. Hon. Wm. L. MARCY,

Secretary of War, Washington city.

HEAD-QUARTERS, Q. M. GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT,

New Orleans, November 28, 1846. Sir: Mr. McLane returned from the head-quarters of the army of Mexico last night. From the information received from him of the state of things there, as well as from information derived from reports and from other sources, I consider it my duty to proceed at once to Matamoras. General Patterson I learn has orders to proceed by land to Victoria or Tampico, and is delayed by the want of transportation; and this, 100, in a country possessing the means of transportation for a population of more than two hundred thousand souls. The authority of the general-in-chief of the army in the field, or of the general commanding the division ordered to move, would alone suffice to obtain all the transportation necessary for any operations; but it is my duty to say that ihere has been no provident foresight exercised by any one in command, as far as I am informed and believe; but the officers of the department have, like myself, been obliged to guess what might be wanted, and risk an over supply of some, and not a sufficient supply of other atticles. Every thing asked for by the army has been furmished many times over, I believe, unless it were the tents required by Colonel (now General) Twiggs for his horses, which I believe you and Colonel Stanton refused to allow, and properly so; for there would have been quite as much propriety in requiring mosquito bars as tents for the cavalry horses.

To enable me to place matters in a proper train on the frontier, from eighty to a hundred thousand dollars will be required. I will direct Captain Hetzel to draw on Colonel Stanton for the sum required, and I ask the favor of you that the drafts be.promptly paid. I have the honor to be, sir, your most obedient servant,

TH. S. JESUP, Major General, and Quartermaster General. Hon. W. L. MARCY,

Secretary of War, Washington city.

New Orleans, December 3, 1846. Sır: Mr. McLane, for whose arrival I was waiting, having returned, I was about to proceed to Brazos on the 1st instant in the Alabama, when I found an opportunity of obtaining raluable information in relation to the harbors and towns on the coast of Mexico, of the resources of the country in the vicinity of them, and of the routes into the inierior. I accordingly sent Captain Hetzel forward, and waited for the Fashion, which will leave on Saturday the 5th, and proceed via La Vaca to Brazos. I have obtained much valuable and useful information. I have, besides, had an opportunity of inquiring into a report which was rife here yesterday, and which has affected to some extent insurances to-day, that several privateers, acting under authority of the Mexican government, are about to precipitate themselves from the ports of Cuba upon our commerce in the gulf. They have been variously estimated to number from twelve to forty. That there is some truth in the report there can be no doubt, though the number has been greatly exaggerated. There can be as little doubt that if they commence their plunderings, it will be with the connivance of the Spanish authorities. A single privateer could at any time during the last six months have cut off the supplies of the army in Mexico. There has been no naval protection afforded, and we owe our security to the want of energy, or the want of means of our enemy.

Determined energy on the part of the government will put down the whole scheme of privateering. Let Spain be made responsible, and make Cuba the forfeit, if a single privatcer proceed from one of her ports, or a single prize be taken into one of them. She has the power to prevent it, and should be compelled to do so. If she do not, you can readily get a hundred thousand men to force her to do it.

I made a contract on the 1st instant for two thousand best draught Mexican mules, to be delivered at Matamoras and Brazos San Iago within the present month. Ten thousand could have been obtained at any time since the army has been in Mexico, had proper measures been adopted to obtain thera.

General Wool, I apprehend, has embarrassed himself with an unwieldy train of several hundred wagons among the mountains of Mexico. I foresaw that if he used wagons, his operations would be without results. I apprehend his large train, gotten up at great expense, will be lost. He cannot take it forward, and it will require a guard to bring it back that he cannot very well spare, and which he ought not to spare. Had General Harrison waited for wagons, he would not have captured the British army in 1813.

I go to La Vaca to give the necessary orders for the supply of the Texan regiment, and to have that portion of General Wool's train which we can reach transferred to the Rio Grande. Thence I shall go to the Rio Grande, and, after putting every thing in a proper state there, to Tampico; and should active operations not soon commence, I will return to this city. I am, sir, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

TH. S. JESUP,

Quartermaster General. The Hon. Wm. L. MARCY,

Secretary of War, Washington city.

Brazos San Iago, Texas,

December 27, 1846. Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 11th instant.

Transportation can be provided here for all the troops that may be drawn from the army under the command of General Taylor, and for all the ordnance, ordnance stores, and other supplies, which may be drawn either from this depot or from New Orleans. The public transports--I mean those owned by the United Statesthat can be spared for the contemplated operations, it is estimated will carry three thousand men, with all their supplies. Vessels can be chartered here on t'avorable terms for any additional transportation that may be required. The point of concentration, Pensacola, is too distant from our object--secrecy in our country is out of the question. When I left New Orleans on the 6th instant, the public seemed to understand, as well as the officers who are to conduct the operations, that Vera Cruz was the object of attack. General Scott, who is here, has decided to concentrate at the islands of Blanquilla and Lobos, a few miles southeast of cape Roxo, and some fifteen or twenty miles north of Tuspan. Southwest of these islands is perhaps the best anchorage on the gulf-sufficient for a hundred ships, well sheltered from the northers. The English have used this anchorage in their smuggling operations inore than a century; an it is the place where their ships that take quicksilver to Tampico, for the mines of San Luis and Catorce, await the returns from the interior. From these islands to Vera Cruz, distant about two hundred miles, the coast is clear and deep; throughout the whole distance there is from 41 to 6 fathoms water at from one to two miles from the shore. The only points in the whole distance presenting the slightest danger are some rocky ridges stretching out from Juan Angel and Pont Gorda, which every seaman wbo has ever been on the coast knows how to avoid. The point selected by the general being the resort of vessels coming to Tampico, will distract the enemy's attention by rendering it doubtful whether San Luis or Vera Cruz be the object of attack.

We have reports from the interior that Santa Anna is near Saltill, with a large force. I do not believe the force so large as it has been represented; but if it is, so much the better-seven thousand men will soon be concentrated to peet it, and will give a good account of it.

The quartermaster's department is far from being efficient: the officers are efficient individually, but they are not sufficiently numerous for the highly responsible and laborious duties that devolve upon them. I earnestly recommend that four additional quartermasters, to be taken from the army, and ten additional assistants, to be taken from the subalterns of the army, be authorized by law; and I further recommend that a regimental quartermaster be appointed to each regiment, to be taken from the subalterns of the regiments respectively, with the same additional pay and emoluments as are now allowed to adjutants. This additional force

would enable the department to perform every duty as it should be performed. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

TH. S. JESUP,

Major Gen. and Quartermaster General. The Hon. Wm. L. MARCY,

Secrelary of War, Washington city. Read." I concur in the opinion that the numerical force (officers) of the Quartermaster's Department is not sufficient for the war; and hoping that the additional major per regiment, and the additional 2d lieutenant per company, will be authorized by Congress, I recommend that Brevet Major General. Jesup's suggestions be adopted.

WINFIELD SCOTT. DECEMBER 28, 1846.

BRAZOS San Lago, TEXAS,

December 29, 1846. Sir: Adverting to my letter of the 28th ultimo, it is due to General Patterson to say that he gave orders to the Quartermaster's Department for the necessary train and supplies the moment, as he informed me, that he was apprised of the nature of the movement he was required to make; and he bears testimony to the zeal and promptitude of Captain Myers, on whom the labor of forming the train and providing the supplies devolved. A delay of a day or two occurred on account of a portion of the forage not arriving in time; but that arose not from neglect on the part of any officer of the department, but from the loss of two steamboats employed in sending supplies hence to the Rio Grande, and of other vessels employed in lightering, and in similar service with the steamboats. The moment the deficiency was observed, it was promptly supplied.

I beg that this letter may be filed with my letter of the 28th ult., above referred to; and

I have the honor to be, most respectfully, sir, your obediert servant,

TH. S. JESUP,

Quartermaster General. The Hon. Wm. L. MARCY,

Secretary of War, Washington city.

Brazos San Iago, Texas, January 1, 1847. Sir: A very heavy expense is constantly being incurred by the damage of subsistence and other public stores, occasioned by the stores not being put up in casks or sacks sufficient to preserve them from the weather. The consequence is, that the public property, after it has been placed at the points at or near where it is required

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