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United States, and who have been or shall have been engaged in violating the blockade of the insurgent ports, shall leave the United States within twelve days from the publication of this order, or from their subsequent arrival in the United States, if on the Atlantic side, and forty days if on the Pacific side, of the country; and such persons shall not return to the United States during the continuance of the war. Provostmarshals and marshals of the United States will arrest and commit to military custody all such offenders as shall disregard this order, whether they have passports or not, and they will be detained in such custody until the end of the war, or until discharged by subsequent orders of the President.

W. H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State.

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 50.

WAR DEPARTMENT,
ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, March 27, 1865. Ordered, first. That at the hour of noon on the 14th day of April, 1865, Brevet Major-General Anderson will raise and plant upon the ruins of Fort Sumter, in Charleston Harbor, the same United States flag which floated over the battlements of that fort during the rebel assault, and which was lowered and saluted by him and the small force of his command when the works were evacuated on the 14th day of April, 1861.

Second. That the flag, when raised, be saluted by one hundred guns from Fort Sumter and by a national salute from every fort and rebel battery that fired upon Fort Sumter.

Third. That suitable ceremonies be had upon the occasion, under the direction of Major-General William T. Sherman, whose military operations compelled the rebels to evacuate Charleston, or, in his absence, under the charge of Major-General Q. A. Gillmore, commanding the department. Among the ceremonies will be the delivery of a public address by the Rev. Henry Ward Beecher.

Fourth. That the naval forces at Charleston and their commander on that station be invited to participate in the ceremonies of the occasion. By order of the President of the United States:

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

To all whom these presents may concern:

Whereas for some time past evil-disposed persons have crossed the borders of the United States or entered their ports by sea from countries where they are tolerated, and have committed capital felonies against the property and life of American citizens, as well in the cities as in the rural districts of the country:

Now, therefore, in the name and by the authority of the President of the United States, I do hereby make known that a reward of $1,000 will be paid at this Department for the capture of each of such offenders, upon his conviction by a civil or military tribunal, to whomsoever shall arrest and deliver such offenders into the custody of the civil or military authorities of the United States. And the like reward will be paid upon the same terms for the capture of any such persons so entering the United States whose offenses shall be committed subsequently to the publication of this notice.

A reward of $500 will be paid upon conviction for the arrest of any person who shall have aided and abetted offenders of the class before named within the territory of the United States.

Given under my hand and the seal of the Department of State, at Washington, this 4th day of April, A. D. 1865. [SEAL.]

WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State.

DEATH OF PRESIDENT LINCOLN.

ANNOUNCEMENT TO THE VICE-PRESIDENT.

[lirom the original, Department of State.]

WASHINGTON CITY, D. C.,

April 15, 1865. ANDREW JOHNSON,

Vice-President of the United States. SIR: Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, was shot by an assassin last evening at Ford's Theater, in this city, and died at the hour of twenty-two minutes after 7 o'clock.

About the same time at which the President was shot an assassin entered the sick chamber of the Hon. William H. Seward, Secretary of State, and stabbed him in several places in the throat, neck, and face-severely if not mortally wounding him. Other members of the Secretary's family were dangerously wounded by the assassin while making his escape. By the death of President Lincoln the office of President has devolved, under the Constitution, upon you. The emergency of the Government demands that you should immediately qualify, according to the requirements of the Constitution, and enter upon the duties of President

of the United States. If you will please make known your pleasure,
such arrangements as you deem proper will be made.

Your obedient servants,
HUGH MCCULLOCH,

W. DENNISON,
Secretary of the Treasury.

Postmaster-General.
EDWIN M. STANTON, J. P. USHER,

Secretary of War. Secretary of the Interior.
GIDEON WELLES,

JAMES SPEED,
Secretary of Nazy.

Allorney-General.

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[From the Daily National Intelligencer, April 17, 1865.]

The Vice-President responded that it would be agreeable to him to qualify himself for the high office to which he had been so unexpectedly called, under such melancholy circumstances, at his rooms at the Kirkwood Hotel; and at 11 o'clock a. m. [15th] the oath of office was administered to him by Chief Justice Chase, of the Supreme Court of the United States, in the presence of nearly all the Cabinet officers; the Hon. Solomon Foot, United States Senator from Vermont; the Hon. Alexander Ramsey, United States Senator from Minnesota; the Hon. Richard Yates, United States Senator from Illinois; the Hon. John P. Hale, late Senator from New Hampshire; General Farnsworth, of the House of Representatives, from Illinois; F. P. Blair, sr.; Hon, Montgomery Blair, late Postmaster-General, and some others.

[For Inaugural Address of President Johnson, see pp. 305-306.]

ANNOUNCEMENT TO REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED

STATES ABROAD.

[From official records, Department of State.]

CIRCULAR.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, April 17, 1865. SIR: The melancholy duty devolves upon me officially to apprise you of the assassination of the President at Ford's Theater, in this city, in the evening of the 14th instant. He died the next morning from the effects of the wound.

About the same time an attempt was made to assassinate the Secretary of State in his own house, where he was in bed suffering from the effects of the late accident. The attempt failed, but Mr. Seward was severely cut, on the face especially, it is supposed with a bowie knife. Mr. F. W. Seward was felled by a blow or blows on the head, and for some time afterwards was apparently unconscious. Both the Secretary and Assistant Secretary are better, especially the former.

Andrew Johnson has formally entered upon the duties of President.
I have been authorized temporarily to act as Secretary of State.
I am, sir, your obedient servant,

W. HUNTER, Acting Secretary.

ANNOUNCEMENT TO REPRESENTATIVES OF FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS

IN THE UNITED STATES.

[From official records, Department of State.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

IVashington, April 15, 1865. Sir: It is my great misfortune to be obliged to inform you of events not less afflicting to the people of the United States than distressing to my owu feelings and the feelings of all those connected with the Government.

The President of the United States was shot with a pistol last night while attending a theater in this city, and expired this morning from the effects of tlie wound. At about the same time an attempt was made to assassinate the Secretary of State, which, though it fortunately failed, left him severely, but it is hoped not dangerously, wounded with a knife or dagger. Mr. F. W. Seward was also struck in the head with a heavy weapon, and is in a critical condition from the effect of the blows.

Pursuant to the provision of the Constitution of the United States, Andrew Johnson, the Vice-President, has formally assumed the functions of President. I have by him been authorized to perform the duties of Secretary of State until otherwise ordered. I avail myself of the occasion to offer to you the assurance of my

distinguished consideration.

W. HUNTER, Acting Secretary.

ANNOUNCEMENT TO THE ARMY.

[From official records, War Department.)

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 66.

WAR DEPARTMENT,
ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

IVashington, April 16, 1865. The following order of the Secretary of War announces to the armies of the United States the untimely and lamentable death of the illustrious Abraham Lincoln, late President of the United States:

WAR DEPARTMENT, IVashington City, April 16, 1865. The distressing duty has devolved upon the Secretary of War to announce to the armies of the United States that at twenty-two minutes

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after 7 o'clock on the morning of Saturday, the 15th day of April, 1865, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, died of a mortal wound inflicted upon him by an assassin.

The armies of the United States will share with their fellow-citizens the feelings of grief and horror inspired by this most atrocious murder of their great and beloved President and Commander in Chief, and with profound sorrow will mourn his death as a national calamity.

The headquarters of every department, post, station, fort, and arsenal will be draped in mourning for thirty days, and appropriate funeral honors will be paid by every army, and in every department, and at every military post, and at the Military Academy at West Point, to the memory of the late illustrious Chief Magistrate of the nation and Commander in Chief of its armies.

Lieutenant-General Grant will give the necessary instructions for carrying this order into effect.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

On the day after the receipt of this order at the headquarters of each military division, department, army, post, station, fort, and arsenal and at the Military Academy at West Point the troops and cadets will be paraded at 10 o'clock a. m. and the order read to them, after which all labors and operations for the day will cease and be suspended as far as practicable in a state of war.

The national flag will be displayed at half-staff.

At dawn of day thirteen guns will be fired, and afterwards at intervals of thirty minutes between the rising and setting sun a single gun, and at the close of the day a national salute of thirty-six guns.

The officers of the armies of the United States will wear the badge of mourning on the left arm and on their swords and the colors of their commands and regiments will be put in mourning for the period of six months. By command of Lieutenant-General Grant:

W. A. NICHOLS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

ANNOUNCEMENT TO THE NAVY.

(From General Orders and Circulars, Navy Department, 1863 to 1887.]

GENERAL ORDER No. 51.

NAVY DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 15, 1865, The Department announces with profound sorrow to the officers and men of the Navy and Marine Corps the death of Abraham Lincolu, late President of the United States. Stricken down by the hand of an assassin on the evening of the 14th instant, when surrounded by his family

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