Page images
PDF
EPUB
[blocks in formation]

it Reception given by the Publick to the
Int and Second Volumes of this Colle&ion
ointed near twenty Years ago, tho confess’d by
to be deficient of feveral material Treatys,
modern Date, was a good Argument with
Le no Pains or Expence to get those publick
s could not then come at, in order to form a

[ocr errors]

phu thing that encouraged him to proceed in
s was the Recovery of some Treaties made
Charles I. and the two Cromwells, as well as
portant Papers printed in Latin, by Order of
dient, which never yet appear'd in the Enga
sage: these, with other considerable Treatys
Date, as express'd in the Title, and Table

the Editor hop'd might have been com-
Third Volume, with which he did intend to

[ocr errors]

many Treatys and Conventions of Friends

Navigation and Commerce, which have
of late Years; the Addresses presented
ove every Seslion of Parliament for Copys
hitatys, which are but feldom printed; the

[ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

IE Reception given by the Publick to the
first and Second Volumes of this Colle&ion
Printed near twenty Years ago, tho confess'd by
or to be deficient of feveral material Treatys,
a modern Date, was a good Argument with
pare no Pains or Expence to get those publick
e could not then come at, in order to form a

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN LIBRARIES

Tolume.

hirit thing that encouraged him to proceed in
gn, 'was the Recovery of some Treaties made
; Charles I. and the two Cromwells, as well as
portant Papers printed in Latin, by Order of
ament, which never yet appear'd in 'the Eng-
uage : these, with other considerable Treatys
r Date, as express'd in the Title, and Table
ents, the Editor hop'd might have been com-
a Third Volume, with which he did intend to

ppd.

le many Treatys and Conventions of Friend-
ace, Navigation and Commerce, which have
Ide of late Years; the Addresses presented
hrone every Session of Parliament for Copys
reatys, which are but seldom printed; the

[blocks in formation]

genera

Volume.

cicular Acts contain a in the

[ocr errors]

Ularliament allo complain a

eneral acknowledgment of the Utility of Colle&ionsinine; so that Lord Clarendor's Insigua

ich King did pot resolve to employ the this Nature, not only to Ministers and Statelmen,

us from Ireland but only to secure himself ut to all Gentlemen employ'd, or conversant in pu

Torrent which was ready to overwhelm ck Affairs; and the itrong Passions even of the common Pin

Anind Country we live 10, 8 grounded, and confirms that 'twas not o be acquainted with the Proceedings of our Amething but the hopes of subduing the Pare balladors and other Ministers, did all render it nem rich induc'd him to make this Trace. The cellary to complete the Collection with a Fourt. 41 a Declaration publich'd on account

estion, before they had notice of its being

srpresented that all the Complaints from

won by the Au. She does
| We shall here pursue the Method taken by egal his Army, &c. in Ireland, of their being
the Introduction to the Second Volume, by

aprila for wane of Supplies, were much ago
lepin for to

y the private Diregion of the King, who
ting a few Remarks to the Reader on some par-

S to make use of them for a pretence to the . Acts contain'd in the Third and Fourth, and on the general State of. the Affairs of Europe . de Parliament also complain'd strongly on this Period.. .

5 that they were never acquainted by the | The first we shall take notice of is the

thoud with the Treaty of a Ceffation, much Truce betwixt the Irish Royalılts twixt the Irish Royalists and Parliamenta

ar darice demanded; tho by Aa of Parliarians, inserted in Vol. III. p. 6. 'Tis evide

by his Majesty's Commission under the a Paffage in Lord-Clarendon's History, Vol.

barh Houses were to advise, order, and P. 414. that the Design of King Charles

wa chings concerning the Government and ing this Truce was to employ the English Foi

na thar Kingdom. They observ'd also, that were in the Service of that Kingdom, to

Records Justices and Council, who were so Parliament; and that to avoid the Reproach

* to dilwade from this Cellation, were reliable to for so doing, he refoly'd to manage i

a their Places, and committed to Prison. hou'd appear to be done by the Lords Juitio

and other reasons, both Houses declar'd Council of Ireland. The Lord Clarendon ind

ced Celation void, and promis'd to stand nuates, in the passage above referr’d to, tha came not to this Refolution till about the we

Hat Treaty (Vol. III. p. 8.) which King Year 1643, that is, when he was sure the Scots

ee with the Roman Catholicks of Ireland, co send an Army into England. T

of the least curious Transacions of that From the Date of this Truce, that the

do the Lord Clarendon has not thought fit to to make a Truce in Ireland long before the Pana, Vegotiations with Scotland, and before the Scom

stice the King had made with the Irish Rebels, 100 to levy an Army: For his Order to the

tely suspend Hostilities in that Island. Those ustices to affilt the Marquiss of Ormond, in

wolled there for the Parliament and the Scots, ution of his Commission to treat with the R

scept it ; and the English Forces, which the Cessation of Arms, was dated the 230 543, whereas the Scots Resolution was not take

o from Ireland, were entirely ruin'd 22 England ; so that he reap'd no Beneht

from

ho thou'd refuse to submit to it.

do III. p. 6. 'Tis evident from

n's History, Vol. II. Pars I.
of King Charles I. in mak-
oy the English Forces, which

E. Kingdom, to subdue che
avoid the Reproaches he was
olv'd to manage so that it

the Lords Justices and

ord Clarendon indeed insibove referr'd to, that the King

ation till about the close of the .. into England. 'Tis certain however,

e, that the King resolv'd

efore the Parliament's
a before the Scots Resolu-

1s Order to the Lords attuce the key
of Ormond, in the Exe-
eat with the Rebels for

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

and drawn from

Irelana

August

[ocr errors]

A4

-llowing; so that Lord Clarendon's Infioua-
- the King did not resolve to employ the
wrces from Ireland but only to secure himself
me Torrent which was ready to overwhelm
ill grounded, and confirms that 'twas not
essity, but the hopes of subduing the Par-
which induc'd him to make this Truce. The
at, in a Declaration publith'd on account
eslation, before they had notice of its being
H, represented that all the Complaints from
ers of his Army, &c. in Ireland, of their being
perilh for want of Supplies, were much ago
by the private Diređion of the King, who
nd to make use of them for a pretence to the
The Parliament also complain'd strongly on
it, that they were never acquainted by the
Ireland with the Treaty of a Cellation, much
heir Advice demanded; tho by Act of Parlia-
id by his Majesty's Commission under the
zal, both Houses were to advise, order, and
f all things concerning the Goveroment and
of that Kingdom. They obsery'd also, that
he Lords Justices and Council, who were so
s to diffuade from this Cellation, were re-
om their Places, and committed to Prison.
ch, and other reasons, both Houses declar'd
nded Cessation void, and promis'd to stand
who thou'd refuse to submit to it. .
next Treaty (Vol. III. p. 8.) which King
nade with the Roman Catholicks of Ireland,
ne of the least curious Trapsa&ions of that
cho the Lord Clarendon has not thought fit to
it. .
ruce the King had made with the Iris Rebels,
intirely suspend Hoftilities in that Illand. Those
imanded there for the Parliament and the Scots,

accept it ; and the English Forces, which the
d drawn from Ireland, were entirely ruin'd
ersd in England; fo that he reap'd no Benefit
A 4

from

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN LIBRARIES

ploy not only the rest of the

1 for into England. He

[ocr errors]

1. Religion ; which he cou'd tradicting all his Protestations

Religion, without abandon

from this Ceffation, which, he pretended, he was un the contrary; it was much more probable der a necessity of concluding, in order to save the is done solely to increase the Superiority he English from threaten'd Destruction ; tho when,

in: tho when thole certhe Parliament. ng ban Troops came home, 'ić was easy to guess the stated by Rushworth, that this Treaty, tho crue Realon of it. The King, who did not delpare nicely, was discover'dby this extraordina..

The Archbilhop of Tuam joining himlelk The Alliltance of the Iris to profecute the War 2 gainst the Parliament, form’da Project of Pea with out bijb Troops that were going to beliege 'em, that he might employ not only the r

ar or the Security of his Person, or some on

good Body of a them English who were in Ireland, but also a good Body o f the Garison made a Sally when they came Trish, whom he intended to send for into England. hace; by which his Party was routed, and therefore order'd the Marquiss of Ormond to set abo 4 and in his Pockets were found authenthis Peace, in which he foresaw Difficulties leem. set the Treaty attested by several Bishops, mountable, because the Irish muft necessarily be

ya Full Powers given to the Earl of Glasatisfied in the Article of Religion ; which

ng the King, which were sent to the Parlianot do, without contradi&ting all his of Zeal for the Reform'd Religion, witho

y caly add, that upon this Discovery, the ing the Interests of the Irish Proteltan tereits of the Iris Protestants, and of Enga Soforma

SDP DPord, the Lord Digby; then in Ireland, land too, by causing her to lose the Domini

suiers, found no better Expedient to clearthe ways had over Ireland since the Conquelt

auto arrest the Earl of Glamorgan, and threatconsequently without losing many of his ling

devere Pupilhment, for presuming to go 11 England. To obviate these Difficultys, he the Marquiss a long time to persuade the

ders, by concluding a Treaty with the quiesce with the general Promises he migh gratify them at a better Season, when 10

e Manifestoes of the English Parliament,

des General, Anno 1652, (from p. 36 10 59 ore in his power; but they wou'd not truit i

they

Vol.) it may be observ'd, that Adrian Pauw, upon which he resolu'd to grant them what

Plenipotentiary at the Peace of Munier, without Solemnity, or the Intervention of nged, by concluding a private Peace

mballador Extraordinary from the States

ment, to niove for an Accommodation : : executed, when it shou'd be in his po ful, and binding himself to have it effectually

tament infisting upon the same Terms which en it thou'd be in his power to ratity 16

od osd before the my: With which the Trib were well fatisty'a. ,

pelore the Rupture, the States recallid

anddors, and resolu'd to continue the War, "pole, while the Marquiss of Ormond

i Way to obtain a Peace. A Manifesto was pearance' very earnest for a Peace with

y them, in which it was pretended that the 1.8, was treating with them secretly and

dpad begun the War without any Provoca

them; and the Parliament answer'd in anoa ctually, by virtue of a full Power, (men in the Treaty) which was remarkably dat

og forth all their Grievances, or occasions ta time when the King's Affairs did not

Coom fo bad to particularly the Refusal of the Dutch $ to require the making use of a

ill was a Right the Parliament resolv'd he making use of the Irish Catholicks;

all Events. The States reply'd to this,

that

E to lose the Dominion she ale )
lince the Conquest of it, and
ig many of his fincere Friends

thele Difficultys, he employd
time to persuade the Irisb to ac-

Fromiles he might make to be
Season, when it thou'd be

Promises : upon which he relolv
ever they demanded, by concluding

* Amballador ex

Lieutenant, and binding himi

e Intervention of the Lord

Tolemnly: with which the Irij!

To this purpose, while the was to all appearance yery ear che Rebels, the Earl of Glamo che King, was treating more effectually, by virtue.

f Glamorgan, authoriz'd by

w which was a kis ekain at all Events.

while

« ՆախորդըՇարունակել »