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In witness whereof, the said William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners as aforesaid, and the aforesaid Chiefs and Warriors, have hereunto subscribed their names and affixed their seals, this thirteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifteen, and of the independence of the United States the fortieth.

Shamaga, the lance,

Weesaka, the Devil,

Catchemackeseo, the big eagle,
Chekaqua, he that stands by the
tree,

Kataka, or sturgeon,

Mecaitch, the eagle,

WM. CLARK,

NINIAN EDWARDS,
AUGUSTE CHOUTEAU.

Neshota, the twin,

Quashquammee, the jumping fish,
Chagosort, the blues' son,
Pocama, the plumb,

Namachewana, Chaha, the Sioux,
Nanochaatasa, the brave by hazard.

Done at Portage des Siouxs, in the presence of R. Wash, Secretary of the Commission. Thomas Levers, lieut. col. commanding 1st regt. I. T. P. Chouteau, agent. T. Paul, C. C. T. Jas. B. Moore, capt. Samuel Whiteside, capt. Jno. W. Johnson, U. S. factor and Indian agent. Maurice Blondeaux. Samuel Solomon, Noel Mograine, Interpreters. Daniel Converse, 3d lieut.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

A TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP, Made and concluded between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part; and the undersigned King, Chiefs, and Warriors, of the Fox Tribe or Nation, on the part and behalf of the said Tribe or nation, of the other part.

Sept. 14, 1815. Ratified, Dec. 26, 1815.'

THE parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe or nation, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the war, have agreed to the following articles: ARTICLE 1. Every injury or act of hostility by one or either of the Injuries, &c. contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgiven. forgot.

ART. 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between the citizens of the United States of America and all the individuals composing the said Fox tribe or nation.

ART. 3. The contracting parties do hereby agree, promise, and oblige themselves, reciprocally, to deliver up all the prisoners now in their hands, (by what means soever the same may have come into their possession,) to the officer commanding at Fort Clark, on the Illinois river, to be by him restored to their respective nations as soon as it may be practicable.

ART. 4. The said Fox tribe or nation do hereby assent to, recognize, re-establish, and confirm, the treaty of St. Louis, which was concluded on the third day of November, one thousand eight hundred and four, to

Perpetual peace and friendship.

Prisoners to be delivered up.

Treaty of St. Louis, of Nov. firmed.'

3, 1804, con

the full extent of their interest in the same, as well as all other contracts and agreements between the parties; and the United States promise to fulfil all the stipulations contained in the said treaty in favor of the said Fox tribe or nation.

In witness whereof, the said William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners as aforesaid, and the aforesaid King, Chiefs, and Warriors, of the Fox Tribe or Nation aforesaid, have hereunto subscribed their names and affixed their seals, this fourteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifteen, and of the independence of the United States the fortieth.

WM. CLARK,

NINIAN EDWARDS,
AUGUSTE CHOUTEAU.

Pierremaskin, the fox who walks crooked, Paquampa, the bear that sits,

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Done at Portage des Siouxs, in the presence of R. Wash, Secretary to the Commission. Thomas Levens, It. col. comdt. 1 regt. I. T. P. Chouteau, agent. T. Paul, C. C. T. Jas. B. Moore, capt. Samuel Whiteside, capt. Jno. W. Johnson, U. S. factor and I. agent. Maurice Blondeaux. Samuel Solomon, interpreter. Noel Mograine, interpreter. Daniel Converse, 3d lieut.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

Ratified, Dec. 26, 1815.

A TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP,

Sept. 16, 1815. Made and concluded between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part; and the undersigned, King, Chiefs, and Warriors, of the Iaway Tribe or Nation, on the part and behalf of the said Tribe or Nation, of the other part.

Injuries, &c. forgiven.

Perpetual peace and friendship.

THE parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe or nation, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the war, have agreed to the following articles:

ARTICLE 1. Every injury, or act of hostility, by one or either of the contracting parties against the other shall be mutually forgiven and forgot.

ART. 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States and all the individuals composing the said Iaway tribe or nation.

ART. 3. The contracting parties do hereby agree, promise, and oblige themselves, reciprocally to deliver up all the prisoners now in their hands, (by what means soever the same may have come into their possession,) to the officer commanding at St. Louis, to be by him restored to their respective nations, as soon as it may be practicable.

ART. 4. The contracting parties, in the sincerity of mutual friendship, recognize, re-establish, and confirm, all and every treaty, contract, and agreement, heretofore concluded between the United States and the said Iaway tribe or nation.

In witness whereof, the said William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners as aforesaid, and the aforesaid King, Chiefs, and Warriors, have hereunto subscribed their names and affixed their seals, this sixteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifteen, and of the independence of the United States the fortieth.

Wyingwaha, or hard heart,
Wongehehronyne, or big chief,
Wonehee, or the slave,
Hahraga, the forked horn,
Eniswahanee, the big axe,

Washcommanee, the great marcher,
Wyimppishcoonee, the ill-humored

man,

Ranoingga, the little pipe,

WILLIAM CLARK,
NINIAN EDWARDS,
AUGUSTE CHOUTEAU.

Wohomppee, the broth,
Shongatong, the horse jockey,
Nahocheininugga, without ears,
Conja, the plumb,

Chahowhrowpa, the dew-lap,
Manuhanu, the great walker,
Chapee, the pine buffaloe,
Okugwata, the roller,
Ishtagrasa, grey eyes.

Done at Portage des Sioux, in the presence of R. Wash, secretary to the commission. D. Bissel, brig. gen. T. Paul, C. C. T. Samuel Brady, lieut. Geo. Fisher, surgeon Illinois regt. P. Chouteau, agent. Jno. W. Johnson, U. S. factor and I. agent. Samuel Solomon, interpreter. Maurice Blondeaux, agt. Louis Dorion. Dennis Julien. Jas. M.Colloch, capt.

To the Indjan names are subjoined a mark and seal.

Prisoners to be delivered up.

Former treaties recognised and confirmed.

A TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP, Made and concluded between Ninian Edwards and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of one part; and the undersigned Chiefs and Warriors of the Kanzas Tribe of Indians, on the part and behalf of their said Tribe, of the other part.

THE parties being desireous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and their said tribe, and of being placed, in all things, and in every respect, upon the same footing upon which they stood before the late war between the United States and Great Britain, have agreed to the following articles:

Oct. 28, 1815.

Ratified, Dec.

26, 1818.

ARTICLE 1. Every injury or act of hostility by one or either of the Injuries, &c. contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgiven. forgot.

Perpetual peace and friendship.

Protection of U. S. acknow

ledged.

ART. 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America and all the individuals composeing the said Kanzas tribe, and all the friendly relations that existed between them before the war shall be, and the same are hereby, renewed.

ART. 3. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States of America, and of no other nation, power, or sovereign, whatsoever.

In witness whereof, the said Ninian Edwards and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners as aforesaid, and the Chiefs aforesaid, have hereunto subscribed their names and affixed their seals, this twentyeighth day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifteen and of the independence of the United States the fortieth.

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March 22, 1816. Ratified, April 8, 1816.

Cession by

Cherokees to
South Carolina.

ARTICLES OF A TREATY

Made and concluded at the City of Washington, on the twentysecond day of March, one thousand eight hundred and sixteen, between George Graham, being specially authorized by the President of the United States thereto, and the undersigned Chiefs and Headmen of the Cherokee Nation, duly authorized and empowered by the said Nation.

ARTICLE 1. Whereas the Executive of the State of South Carolina has made an application to the President of the United States to extinguish the claim of the Cherokee nation to that part of their lands which Iye within the boundaries of the said State, as lately established and agreed upon between that State and the State of North Carolina; and as the Cherokee nation is disposed to comply with the wishes of their brothers of South Carolina, they have agreed and do hereby agree to cede to the State of South Carolina, and forever quit claim to, the tract Bounds of the of country contained within the following bounds, viz.: beginning on the east bank of the Chattuga river, where the boundary line of the Cherokee nation crosses the same, running thence, with the said boun

cession.

dary line, to a rock on the Blue Ridge, where the boundary line crosses the same, and which rock has been lately established as a corner to the States of North and South Carolina; running thence, south, sixty-eight and a quarter degrees west, twenty miles and thirty-two chains, to a rock on the Chattuga river at the thirty-fifth degree of north latitude, another corner of the boundaries agreed upon by the States of North and South Carolina; thence, down and with the Chattuga, to the beginning.

ART. 2. For and in consideration of the above cession, the United States promise and engage that the State of South Carolina shall pay to the Cherokee nation, or its accredited agent, the sum of five thousand dollars, within ninety days after the President and Senate shall have ratified this treaty: Provided, That the Cherokee nation shall have sanctioned the same in Council: And provided also, That the Executive of the State of South Carolina shall approve of the stipulations contained in this article.

In testimony whereof, the said Commissioner, and the undersigned Chiefs and Headmen of the Cherokee Nation, have hereunto set their hands and seals.

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U. S. engage

for the payment of $5000 by South Carolina.

Proviso.

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WITNESSES PRESENT AT SIGNING AND SEALING :-Return J. Meigs, Jacob Laub, Gid: Davis.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

ARTICLES OF A CONVENTION

Made and entered into between George Graham, specially authorized thereto by the President of the United States, and the undersigned Chiefs and Headmen of the Cherokee Nation, duly authorized and empowered by the said Nation.

March 22, 1816. Ratified, April 8, 1816.

Doubts about

ARTICLE 1. Whereas doubts have existed in relation to the northern boundary of that part of the Creek lands lying west of the Coosa river, boundary. and which were ceded to the United States by the treaty held at Fort Jackson, on the ninth day of August, one thousand eight hundred and fourteen; and whereas, by the third article of the Treaty, dated the seventh of January, one thousand eight hundred and six, between the United States and the Cherokee nation, the United States have recognised a claim on the part of the Cherokee nation to the lands south of the Big Bend of the Tennessee river, and extending as far west as a place on the waters of Bear Creek, [a branch of the Tennessee river,] known by the name of the Flat Rock, or Stone; it is, therefore, now declared and agreed, that a line shall be run from a point on the west bank of the Coosa river, opposite to the lower end of the Ten Islands in said river, and above Fort Strother, directly to the Flat Rock or Stone, on Bear creek, [a branch of the Tennessee river;] which line shall be established as the boundary of the lands ceded by the Creek nation to the United States by the treaty held at Fort Jackson, on the ninth day of August, one thousand eight hundred and fourteen, and of the lands claimed by the Cherokee nation lying west of the Coosa and south of the Tennessee rivers.

Boundary line designated and

established.

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