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agreement, heretofore concluded between the United States and the said tribe or nation, as far as their interest in the same extends.

ART. 3. The undersigned chiefs and warriors as aforesaid, for themselves and those they represent, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States, and of no other nation, power, or sovereign, whatsoever.

ART. 4. The aforesaid chiefs and warriors, for themselves and those they represent, do further promise to remain distinct and separate from the rest of their tribe or nation, giving them no aid or assistance whatever, until peace shall also be concluded between the United States and the said tribe or nation.

Protection of

U.S. acknowledged.

Indians to re

main distinct from the rest of

their tribe.

Prisoners to

ART. 5. The contracting parties do hereby agree, promise, and oblige themselves, reciprocally, to deliver up all prisoners now in their hands be delivered up. (by what means soever the same may have come into their possession) to the officer commanding at Prairie du Chien, to be by him restored to the respective parties hereto, as soon as it may be practicable.

In witness whereof, the commissioners aforesaid, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors as aforesaid, have hereunto subscribed their names, and affixed their seals, this third day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixteen and of the independence of the United States the fortieth.

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Done at St. Louis, in the presence of R. Wash, secretary to the commission. R. Paul, C. T. of the C. Wm. O. Allen, captain U. S. Corps of Artillery. N. Boilvin, agent. Thomas Forsyth, I. agent. Maurice Blondeaux, agent. Henry Delorier, Pierre Lapointe, Baptiste Pereault, Samuel Solomon, and Jacques Mette, Interpreters. To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

ARTICLES OF A TREATY

June 4, 1816.
Proclamation,

Made and entered into at Fort Harrison, in the Indiana Territory between Benjamin Parke, specially authorized thereto by the president of the United States, of the one part, and the Dec. 30, 1816. tribes of Indians called the Weas and Kickapoos, by their chiefs and head men, of the other part.

ART. 1. The Weas and Kickapoos again acknowledge themselves in peace and friendship with the United States.

ART. 2. The said tribes acknowledge the validity of, and declare their determination to adhere to, the treaty of Greenville, made in the year seventeen hundred and ninety-five, and all subsequent treaties which they have respectively made with the United States.

Peace and friendship.

Treaty of Greenville con

firmed.

Boundary line confirmed.

Kickapoos acknowledge a former cession.

ART. 3. The boundary line, surveyed and marked by the United States, of the land on the Wabash and White rivers, ceded in the year eighteen hundred and nine, the said tribes do hereby explicitly recognise and confirm, as having been executed conformably to the several treaties they have made with the United States.

ART. 4. The chiefs and warriors of the said tribe of the Kickapoos acknowledge that they have ceded to the United States all that tract of country which lies between the aforesaid boundary line on the north west side of the Wabash-the Wabash, the Vermillion river, and a line to be drawn from the north west corner of the said boundary line, so as to strike the Vermillion river twenty miles in a direct line from its mouth, according to the terms and conditions of the treaty they made with the United States on the ninth day of December, in the year eighteen hundred and nine.

In testimony whereof, the said Benjamin Parke, and the chiefs and head men of the said tribes, have hereunto set their hands and affixed their seals, at Fort Harrison, in the Indiana Territory, the fourth day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixteen.

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Done in the presence of John L. M.Cullough, secretary to the commissioner. John
T. Chumm, major, commanding Fort Harrison. Gab. I. Floyd, lieutenant United
States army.
Th. M-Call, of Vincennes. Hen. Gilham, of do. N. B. Bailey, of do.
Geo. C. Copp. Michael Brouillet, anteprete au for arisonne. Joseph Barron, sworn
interpreter.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

Aug. 24, 1816.

Proclamation, Dec. 30, 1816.

A TREATY OF PEACE, FRIENDSHIP, AND LIMITS,

Made and concluded between Ninian Edwards, William Clark, and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of said states, of the one part, and the chiefs and warriors of the united tribes of Ottawas, Chipawas, and Pottowotomees, residing on the Illinois and Melwakee rivers, and their waters, and on the southwestern parts of Lake Michigan, of the other part.

WHEREAS a serious dispute has for some time past existed between the contracting parties relative to the right to a part of the lands ceded to the United States by the tribes of Sacs and Foxes, on the third day of November, one thousand eight hundred and four, and both parties being desirous of preserving a harmonious and friendly intercourse, and

of establishing permanent peace and friendship, have, for the purpose of removing all difficulties, agreed to the following terms:

Cession to the

ART. 1. The said chiefs and warriors, for themselves and the tribes they represent, agree to relinquish, and hereby do relinquish, to the United States. United States, all their right, claim, and title, to all the land contained in the before-mentioned cession of the Sacs and Foxes, which lies south of a due west line from the southern extremity of Lake Michigan to the Mississippi river. And they moreover cede to the United States all the land contained within the following bounds, to wit: beginning on the left bank of the Fox river of Illinois, ten miles above the mouth of said Fox river; thence running so as to cross Sandy creek, ten miles above its mouth; thence, in a direct line, to a point ten miles north of the west end of the Portage, between Chicago creek, which empties into Lake Michigan, and the river Depleines, a fork of the Illinois; thence, in a direct line, to a point on Lake Michigan, ten miles northward of the mouth of Chicago creek; thence, along the lake, to a point ten miles southward of the mouth of the said Chicago creek; thence, in a direct line, to a point on the Kankakee, ten miles above its mouth; thence, with the said Kankakee and the Illinois river, to the mouth of Fox river, and thence to the beginning: Provided, nevertheless, That the said tribes shall be permitted to hunt and to fish within the limits of the land hereby relinquished and ceded, so long as it may continue to be the property of the United States.

Proviso.

Relinquishment by U. S.

ART. 2. In consideration of the aforesaid relinquishment and cession, Consideration. the United States have this day delivered to said tribes a considerable quantity of merchandise, and do agree to pay them, annually, for the term of twelve years, goods to the value of one thousand dollars, reckoning that value at the first cost of the goods in the city or place in which they shall be purchased, without any charge for transportation; which said goods shall be delivered to the said tribes at some place on the Illinois river, not lower down than Peoria. And the said United States do moreover agree to relinquish to the said tribes all the land contained in the aforesaid cession of the Sacs and Foxes, which lies north of a due west line, from the southern extremity of Lake Michigan to the Mississippi river, except three leagues square at the mouth of the Ouisconsing river, including both banks, and such other tracts, on or near to the Ouisconsing and Mississippi rivers, as the president of the United States may think proper to reserve: Provided, That such other tracts shall not in the whole exceed the quantity that would be contained in five leagues square.

Proviso.

Peace and

ART. 3. The contracting parties, that peace and friendship may be permanent, promise that in all things whatever, they will act with justice friendship. and correctness towards each other, and that they will, with perfect good faith, fulfill all the obligations imposed upon them by former treaties.

In witness whereof, the said Ninian Edwards, William Clark, and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners aforesaid, and the chiefs and warriors of the aforesaid tribes, have hereunto subscribed their names and affixed their seals, this twenty-fourth day of Auguste, one thousand eight hundred and sixteen, and of the independance of the United States the forty-first.

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Done at St. Louis, in the presence of R. Wash, secretary to the commission. R. Graham, Indian agent for the Territory of Illinois. Thomas Forsyth, Indian agent. J. Maul, lieutenant 8th regiment of Infantry. P. Provenchere, interpreter of the commissioners. Maurice Blondeaux, Indian agent. John Ruland. M. Lewis Clark. Sam. Solomon, interpreter and translator. Jacques Mette, interpreter. Katasa, (a Kickapoo chief.) Tapema, do. Sakappee, do. Kenapeso, do. Pawanaqua, do. Ancowa, do. Mackkattaoushick, do. Shaquabee, do. Quashquammee, a Sac chief. Mecitch, do. Capitoi, a Fox chief. Acoqua, or Kettle, the principal war chief of

Foxes.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

Sept. 14, 1816. Proclamation, Dec. 30, 1816.

Peace and friendship.

Boundary line.

Relinquishment and cession by Cherokees.

TREATY WITH THE CHEROKEES.

To perpetuate peace and friendship between the United States and Cherokee tribe, or nation, of Indians, and to remove all future causes of dissension which may arrise from indefinite territorial boundaries, the president of the United States of America, by major general Andrew Jackson, general David Meriwether, and Jesse Franklin, esquire, commissioners plenipotentiary on the one part, and the Cherokee delegates on the other, covenant and agree to the following articles and conditions, which, when approved by the Cherokee nation, and constitutionally ratified by the government of the United States, shall be binding on all parties:

ART. 1. Peace and friendship are hereby firmly established between the United States and Cherokee nation or tribe of Indians.

ART. 2. The Cherokee nation acknowledge the following as their western boundary: South of the Tennessee river, commencing at Camp Coffee, on the south side of the Tennessee river, which is opposite the Chickasaw Island, running from thence a due south course to the top of the dividing ridge between the waters of the Tennessee and Tombigby rivers, thence eastwardly along said ridge, leaving the head waters of the Black Warrior to the right hand, untill opposed by the west branch of Well's Creek, down the east bank of said creek to the Coosa river, and down said river.

ART. 3. The Cherokee nation relinquish to the United States all claim, and cede all title to lands laying south and west of the line, as described in the second article; and, in consideration of said relinquishment and cession, the commissioners agree to allow the Cherokee nation an annuity of six thousand dollars, to continue for ten successive years, and five thousand dollars, to be paid in sixty days after the ratification of the treaty, as a compensation for any improvements which the said nation may have had on the lands surrendered.

ART. 4. The two contracting parties covenant, and agree, that the line, as described in the second article, shall be ascertained and marked by commissioners, to be appointed by the president of the United States; that the marks shall be bold; trees to be blazed on both sides of the line, and the fore and aft trees to be marked with the letters U. S.; that the commissioners shall be accompanied by two persons, to be appointed by the Cherokee nation, and that said nation, shall have due and seasonable notice when said operation is to be commenced.

Line to be run

by U.S.

ART. 5. It is stipulated that the Cherokee nation will meet general A council to Andrew Jackson, general David Meriwether, and Jesse Franklin, be held. esquire, in council, at Turkey's Town, Coosa river, on the 28th of September, (instant,) there and then to express their approbation, or not, of the articles of this treaty; and if they do not assemble at the time and place specified, it is understood that the said commissioners may report the same as a tacit ratification, on the part of the Cherokee nation, of this treaty.

In testimony whereof, the said commissioners, and undersigned.chiefs and delegates of the Cherokee nation, have hereto set their hands and seals. Done at the Chickasaw council house, this fourteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixteen.

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WITNESS, James Gadsden, secretary to the commissioners. Arthur P. Hayne, inspector general, division of the south. James C. Bronaugh, hospital surgeon, United States army. John Gordon. John Rhea. Thomas Wilson, and A. M‹Coy, interpreters for the Cherokees.

Ratified at Turkey Town, by the whole Cherokee nation, in council assembled. In testimony whereof, the subscribing commissioners of the United States, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors of the Cherokee nation, have hereto set their hands and seals, this fourth day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixteen.

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WITNESS, James Gadsden, secretary. Return J. Meigs. Richard Taylor, and

A. McCoy, interpreters.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

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