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Division of the tract at Hog Creek.

Division of the tract including Lewistown.

Division of the tract for the Delawares.

up hill, Magotha, Tecumtequa, Setepakothe, Kekentha, Shiatwa, Shiabwasson, Koghkela, Akopee or a Heep of any thing, Lamatothe, Kesha, Pankoor, Peitehthator or Peter, Metchepelah, Capeah, Showagame, Wawaleepesheeka, Meewensheka, Nanemepahtoo or Trotter, Pamitchepetoo, Chalequa, Tetetee, Lesheshe, Nawabasheka or white feather, Skepakeskeshe, Tenakee, Shemaka, Pasheto, Thiatcheto, Metchemetche, Chacowa, Lawathska, Potchetee or the Man without a tail, Awabaneshekaw, Patacoma, Lamakesheka, Papashow, Weathaksheka, Pewaypee, Totah, Canaqua, Skepakutcheka, Welviesa, Kitahoe, Neentakoshe, Oshaishe, Chilosee, Quilaisha, Mawethaque, Akepee, Quelenee. The tract of five miles square, at Hog creek, is to be equally divided among the following persons, namely: Peeththa, Onowashim, Pematheywa, Wabekesheke, Leeso, Pohcaywese, Shemagauashe, Nehquakahucka, Papaskootepa, Meamepetoo, Welawenaka, Petiska, Ketuckepe, Lawitchetee, Epaumee, Chanacke, Jose, Lanawytucka, Shawaynaka, Wawatashewa, Ketaksosa, Shashekopeah, Lakose, Quinaska.

The tract of forty-eight square miles, including Lewistown, is to be equally divided among the following persons, namely: Shawnoese — Colonel Lewis, Polly Kizer, Theueteseepuah or Weed, Calossete, Vamauweke, Waucumsee, Skitlewa, Nayabepe, Wosheta, Nopamago, Willesque, Salock, Walathe, Silversmith, Siatha, Toseluo, Jemmy M'Donald, Jackson, Mohawk Thomas, Silverheels, John, Wewachee, Cassic, Atshena, Frenchman, Squesenau, Goohunt, Manwealte, Walisee, Billy, Thawwamee, Wopsquitty, Naywale, Big Turtle, Nolawat, Nawalippa, Razor, Blue, Tick, Nerer, Falling Star, Hale Clock, Hisoscock, Essquaseeto, Geore, Nuussome, Sauhanoe, Joseph, Scotowe, Battease, Crow, Shilling, Scotta, Nowpour, Nameawah, Quemauto, Snife, Captain, Taudeteso, Sonrise, Sowget, Deshau, Lettle Lewis, Jacquis, Tonaout, Swaunacou, General, Cussaboll, Bald, Crooked Stick, Wespata, Newasa, Garter, Porcupine, Pocaloche, Wocheque, Sawquaha, Enata, Panther, Colesetos, Joe. Senecas-Civil John, Wild Duck, Tall Man, Molasses, Ash, Nahanexa, Tasauk, Agusquenah, Roughleg, Quequesaw, Playful, Hairlip, Sieutinque, Hillnepewayatuska, Tauhunsequa, Nynoah, Suchusque, Leemutque, Treuse, Sequate, Caumecus, Scowneti, Tocondusque, Conhowdatwaw, Cowista, Nequatren, Cowhousted, Gillwas, Axtaea, Conawwehow, Sutteasee, Kiahoot, Crane, Silver, Bysaw, Crayfiste, Woollyhead, Conundahaw, Shacosaw, Coindos, Hutchequa, Nayau, Connodose, Coneseta, Nesluauta, Owl, Couauka, Cocheco, Couewash, Sinnecowacheckowe or Leek.

The tract of three miles square for the Delaware Indians, adjoining the tract of twelve miles square upon the Sandusky river, is to be equally divided among the following persons, namely: Captain Pipe, Zeshauau or James Armstrong, Mahawtoo or John Armstrong, Sanowdoyeasquaw or Silas Armstrong, Teorow or Black Raccoon, Hawdorowwatistie or Billy Montour, Buck Wheat, William Dondee, Thomas Lyons, Johnny Cake, Captain Wolf, Isaac Hill, John Hill, Tishatahoones or widow Armstrong, Ayenucere, Hoomaurow or John Ming, Youdorast.

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A TREATY OF LIMITS

Between the United States and the Creek nation of Indians, made and concluded at the Creek Agency, on Flint river, the twentysecond day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighteen.

JAMES MONROE, President of the United States of America, by David Brydie Mitchell, of the state of Georgia, agent of Indian affairs for the Creek nation, and sole commissioner, specially appointed for that purpose, on the one part, and the undersigned kings, chiefs, head men, and warriors, of the Creek nation, in council assembled, on behalf of the said nation, of the other part, have entered into the following articles and conditions, viz:

Jan. 22, 1818.

Proclamation,

March 28, 1818.

The Creeks

cede two tracts of land to U. S.

Bounds of the

ART. 1. The said kings, chiefs, head men, and warriors, do hereby agree, in consideration of certain sums of money to be paid to the said Creek nation, by the government of the United States, as hereinafter stipulated, to cede and forever quit claim, [and do, in behalf of their said nation, hereby cede, relinquish, and forever quit claim, Junto the United States, all right, title, and interest, which the said nation have, or claim, in or unto, the two following tracts of land, situate, lying, and being, within the following bounds; that is to say: 1st. Beginning at the mouth of Goose Creek, on the Alatamahau river, thence, first tract. along the line leading to the Mounts, at the head of St. Mary's river, to the point where it is intersected by the line run by the commissioners of the United States under the treaty of Fort Jackson, thence, along the said last-mentioned line, to a point where a line, leaving the same, shall run the nearest and a direct course, by the head of a creek called by the Indians Alcasalekie, to the Ocmulgee river; thence, down the said Ocmulgee river, to its junction with the Oconee, the two rivers there forming the Alatamahau; thence, down the Alatamahau, to the first-mentioned bounds, at the mouth of Goose creek. 2d. Beginning at the high shoals of the Appalachee river, and from thence, along the line designated by the treaty made at the city of Washington, on the fourteenth day of November, one thousand eight hundred and fifteen, to the Ulcofouhatchie, it being the first large branch, or fork, of the Ocmulgee, above the Seven Islands; thence, up the eastern bank of the Ulcofouhatchie, by the water's edge, to where the path, leading from the high shoals of the Appalachie to the shallow ford on the Chatahochie, crosses the same; and, from thence, along the said path, to the shallow ford on the Chatahochie river; thence, up the Chatahochie river, by the water's edge, on the eastern side, to Suwannee old town; thence, by a direct line, to the head of Appalachie; and thence, down the same, to the first-mentioned bounds at the high shoals of Appalachie.

Second tract.

Payment for

ART. 2. It is hereby stipulated and agreed, on the part of the United States, as a full consideration for the two tracts of land ceded by the said cession. Creek nation in the preceding article, that there shall be paid to the Creek nation by the United States, within the present year, the sum of twenty thousand dollars, and ten thousand dollars shall be paid annually for the term of ten succeeding years, without interest; making, in the whole, eleven payments in the course of eleven years, the present year inclusive; and the whole sum to be paid, one hundred and twenty thousand dollars.

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ART. 3. And it is hereby further agreed, on the part of the United States, that, in lieu of all former stipulations relating to blacksmiths, they will furnish the Creek nation for three years with two blacksmiths and strikers.

ART. 4. The President may cause any line to be run which may be necessary to designate the boundary of any part of both, or either, of the tracts of land ceded by this treaty, at such time, and in such manner, as he may deem proper. And this treaty shall be obligatory on the contracting parties as soon as the same shall be ratified by the government of the United States.

Done at the place, and on the day and year, before written.

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Present, D. Brearly, col. 7th inf. Wm. S. Mitchell, ast. agent, I. A. C. N. M. Johnson, It. corps of artillery. Sl. Hawkins, George [G. L.] Lovett, Interpreters.

To the Indian names is subjoined a mark.

June 18, 1818.

Proclamation, Jan. 7, 1819.

Injuries, &c. forgiven.

Perpetual peace and friendship.

Protection of

U. S. acknowledged.

Violators of

A TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP

Made and concluded by, and between, William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors of the Grand Pawnee tribe, on the part and behalf of their said tribe, of the other part.

THE parties, being desirous of establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe, have agreed to the following articles:

ART. 1. Every injury, or act of hostility, by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot.

ART. 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the said Grand Pawnee tribe.

ART. 3. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States of America, and of no other nation, power, or sovereign, whatsoever.

ART. 4. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and the this treaty to be tribe they represent, do moreover promise and oblidge themselves to deliver up, or cause to be delivered up, to the authority of the United States, (to be punished according to law,) each and every individual of

delivered up,

&c.

the said tribe, who shall, at any time hereafter, violate the stipulations of the treaty this day concluded between the said tribe and the said United States.

In witness whereof the said William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners as aforesaid, and the said chiefs and warriors as aforesaid, have hereunto subscribed their names and affixed their seals, this eighteenth day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighteen, and of the Independence of the United States the forty-second.

WM. CLARK,
AUG. CHOUTEAU.

Teratuewit, the Bald Eagle,

Taheerish, the Soldier,

Petaperishta, Who wants to go to War, Tarraecarwaa, the Wild Cat,
Talawehouree, the Follower,

Settulushaa, the Knife Chief,
Shakororishshara, Chief of the Sun,

Tarrarevetiishta, the Round Shield,

Telawaheartcarookot, the Fighter,
Kagakereeouk, the Crow's Eye,

Tarraricarrawaa, the Grand Chief Big Arorishhara, the Warrior,

Hair,

Shinggacahega,

Aiuwechouoneweeka, Chief of the Birds, Latatorishhara, the Chief of the Shield.

Islaeapee,

Done at St. Louis, in the presence of R. Wash, Secretary to the Commission. R. Paul, Col. M. M. Jno. O. Fallon, Capt. R. R. Jno. Ruland, Sub Agent and Trans. &c. A. L. Papin, Interpreter. Wm. Grayson. I. T. Honore, Interpreter. Stephen Julian, U. S. Interpreter. Josiah Ramsey. Jh. Robedout.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

A TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP,

Made and concluded by, and between, William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part, and the undersigned, chiefs and warriors of the Pitavirate Noisy Pawnee tribe, on the part and behalf of their said tribe, of the other part.

THE parties, being desirous of establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe, have agreed to the following articles:

ART. 1. Every injury or act of hostility by one or either of the contracting parties, against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. ART. 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the said Noisy Pawnee tribe.

ART. 3. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States of America, and of no other nation, power, or sovereign, whatsoever.

June 19, 1818.

Proclamation,

Jan. 7, 1819.

Injuries, &c. forgiven.

Perpetual peace and friendship.

Protection of

U. S. acknowledged.

Violators of

ART. 4. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and the tribe they represent, do moreover promise and oblige themselves to deliver up, or cause to be delivered up, to the authority of the United &c.

this treaty to be delivered up,

States, (to be punished according to law,) each and every individual of the said tribe, who shall, at any time hereafter, violate the stipulations of the treaty this day concluded between the said Noisy Pawnee tribe and the said States.

In witness whereof the said William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners as aforesaid, and the chiefs and warriors aforesaid, have hereunto subscribed their names, and affixed their seals, this nineteenth day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighteen, and of the Independence of the United States the forty-second.

Taretuushta, the First in War,
Charuvaru, the Great Chief,

Skalavalacharo, the only Grand Chief,

Panukuhike, the Chief Man,

Islitataveeirou, the Discoverer,

WM. CLARK,

AUG. CHOUTEAU.

Taarakarukaishta, the Handsome Bird,
Lecoutswaroushtu, the Buffaloe Doctor,
Tacacatahekou, the Running Wolf,
Kewatookoush, the Little Fox.

Done at St. Louis, in the presence of R. Wash, Secretary to the Commission. R. Paul, Col. M. M. C. Interpreter. R. Graham, I. Agent Illinois Territory. Jno. O. Fallon, Capt. R. Regt. Jno. Ruland, S. Agent, Trans. &c. A. L. Papin, Interpreter Inds. I. T. Honore, Id. Interpreter. S. Julian, U. S. Ind. Interpreter. Josiah Ramsey. Wm. Grayson. Jno. Robedout.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

Proclamation, Jan. 17, 1819.

A TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP,

June 20, 1818. Made and concluded by, and between, William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part, and the undersigned, chiefs and warriors of the Pawnee Republic, on the part and behalf of their tribe, of the other part.

Injuries, &c. forgiven.

Perpetual peace and Friendship.

Protection of U. S. acknow. ledged.

Violators of

this treaty to be
delivered up,
&c.

THE parties, being desirous of establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe, have agreed to the following articles:

ART. 1. Every injury or act of hostility, by one or either of the contracting parties, against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot.

ART. 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the said Pawnee tribe.

ART. 3. The undersigned, chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States of America, and of no other nation, power, or sovereign, whatsoever.

ART. 4. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and the tribe they represent, do moreover promise and oblidge themselves to deliver up, or to cause to be delivered up, to the authority of the United States, (to be punished according to law,) each and every individual of the said tribe who shall, at any time hereafter, violate the stipulations of the treaty this day concluded between the said Pawnee Republic and the said States.

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