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In witness whereof the said William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners as aforesaid, and the chiefs and warriors aforesaid, have hereunto subscribed their names and affixed their seals, this twentieth day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighteen, and of the independence of the United States the forty-second.

Petaheick, the Good Chief,

Raruleshare, the Chief Man,

Sheruakitare, the First in the War Party,
Sheterahiate, the Partizan Discoverer,

WM. CLARK,

AUG. CHOUTEAU.

Tearekatacaush, the Brave,
Pa, or the Elk,

Tetawiouche, Wearer of shoes.

Done at St. Louis, in the presence of R. Wash, Secretary to the Commission. R. Paul, Col. M. M. C. Interpreter. R. Graham, I. A. Ill. Ter. Jno. O. Fallon, Capt. R. Regt. Jno. Ruland, Sub Agt. Transl'r. &c. A. L. Papin, Interpreter. I. T. Honore, Id. Interpreter. S. Julian, U. S. Id. Interpreter. Wm. Grayson. Josiah Ramsey. Jno. Robedout.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

A TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP,

Made and concluded by, and between, William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part, and the undersigned, chiefs and warriors of the Pawnee Marhar tribe, on the part and behalf of their said tribe, of the other part.

THE parties, being desirous of establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe, have agreed to the following articles:

ART. 1. Every injury or act of hostility, by one or either of the contracting parties, against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot.

ART. 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the said Pawnee tribe.

ART. 3. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States of America, and of no other nation, power, or sovereign, whatsoever.

ART. 4. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and the tribe they represent, do moreover promise and oblidge themselves to deliver up, or to cause to be delivered up, to the authority of the United States, (to be punished according to law,) each and every individual of the said tribe, who shall, at any time hereafter, violate the stipulations of the treaty this day concluded between the said Pawnee Marhar tribe and the said States.

In witness whereof the said William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners as aforesaid, and the chiefs and warriors aforesaid,

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have hereunto subscribed their names and affixed their seals, this twenty-second day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighteen, and of the Independence of the United States the forty-second.

WM. CLARK,

AUG. CHOUTEAU.

Tearacheticktickspa, the Peace Maker,

Kakaletahaw, the Crow of other Nations, Labehorashea, the Presence Striker,

Tarahautacaw, White Bull,

Tearilari Sacki, Red Hawk,

Larapa Kouch, the Soldier,

Tahorou, the Gun Flint,

Teakahore, the Divider of the Party,

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Letireeshar, the Knife Chief,

Done at St. Louis, in the presence of R. Wash, Secretary to the Commission. R. Graham, I. A. Illinois Territory. Jno. O. Fallon, Captain Rifle Regiment. R. Paul, Colonel M. M. C. Interpreter. Jno. Ruland, Sub Agent, Trans'r, &c. A. L. Papin, Interpreter. I. T. Honore, Indian Interpreter. I. Julian, U. S. Indian Interpreter. Wm. Grayson. Josiah Ramsey. Jno. Robedout.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

Proclamation, Jan. 5, 1818.

A TREATY OF FRIENDSHIP, CESSION, AND LIMITS,

Aug. 24, 1818. Made and entered into, this twenty-fourth day of August, eighteen hundred and eighteen, by, and between, William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners on the part and behalf of the United States, of the one part, and the undersigned, chiefs and warriors of the Quapaw tribe or nation, on the part and behalf of their said tribe or nation, of the other part.

Protection of U. S. acknow

ledged.

Cession of lands.

ART. 1. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe or nation, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States, and of no other state, power, or sovereignty, whatsoever.

ART. 2. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe or nation, do hereby, for, and in consideration of, the promises and stipulations hereinafter named, cede and relinquish to the United States, forever, all the lands within the following boundaries, viz: Beginning at the mouth of the Arkansaw river; thence, extending up the Arkansaw, to the Canadian fork, and up the Canadian fork to its source; thence south, to Big Red river, and down the middle of that river, to the Big Raft; thence, a direct line, so as to strike the Mississippi river, thirty leagues in a straight line, below the mouth of Arkansaw; together with all their claims to land east of the Mississippi, and north of the Arkansaw, river, included within the coloured lines 1, 2, and 3, on the above map, with the exception and reservation following, that is to say: the tract of country bounded as follows: Beginoriginal treaty.) ning at a point on the Arkansaw river, opposite the present post of Arkansaw, and running thence, a due southwest course, to the Washita river; thence, up that river, to the Saline fork; and up the Saline fork to a point, from whence a due north course would strike the Arkansaw river at the Little Rock; and thence, down the right bank of the Arkansaw, to the place of beginning: which said tract of land, last above designated and reserved, shall be surveyed and marked off, at the ex

(*A map accompanies the

Reservation.

pence of the United States, as soon as the same can be done with convenience, and shall not be sold or disposed of, by the said Quapaw tribe or nation, to any individual whatever, nor to any state or nation, without the approbation of the United States first had and obtained.

ART. 3. It is agreed, between the United States and the said tribe or nation, that the individuals of the said tribe or nation shall be at liberty to hunt within the territory by them ceded to the United States, without hindrance or molestation, so long as they demean themselves peaceably, and offer no injury or annoyance to any of the citizens of the United States, and untill the said United States may think proper to assign the same, or any portion thereof, as hunting grounds to other friendly Indians.

ART. 4. No citizen of the United States, or any other person, shall be permitted to settle on any of the lands hereby allotted to, and reserved for, the said Quapaw tribe or nation, to live and hunt on; yet it is expressly understood and agreed on, by, and between, the parties aforesaid, that, at all times, the citizens of the United States shall have the right to travel and pass freely, without toll or exaction, through the Quapaw reservation, by such roads or routes as now are, or hereafter may be, established.

The Quapaws may hunt in the ceded territory, until, &c.

No persons to

settle on lands

reserved.

Payment in

ceded.

ART. 5. In consideration of the cession and stipulations aforesaid, the United States do hereby promise and bind themselves to pay and deliver goods for lands to the said Quapaw tribe or nation, immediately upon the execution of this treaty, goods and merchandize to the value of four thousand dollars, and to deliver, or cause to be delivered, to them, yearly, and every year, goods and merchandize to the value of one thousand dollars, to be estimated in the city or place, in the United States, where the same are procured or purchased.

No private revenge for injuries by individuals.

Offenders to be delivered up

ART. 6. Least the friendship which now exists between the United States and the said tribe or nation, should be interrupted by the misconduct of individuals, it is hereby agreed, that, for injuries done by individuals, no private revenge or retaliation shall take place; but, instead thereof, complaints shall be made by the party injured, to the other; by the tribe or nation aforesaid, to the governor, superintendent of Indian affairs, or some other person authorized and appointed for that purpose; and by the governor, superintendant, or other person authorized, to the chiefs of the said tribe or nation. And it shall be the duty of the said tribe or nation, upon complaint being made, as aforesaid, to deliver up for punishment. the person or persons, against whom the complaint is made, to the end that he or they may be punished, agreeably to the laws of the state or territory where the offence may have been committed; and, in like manner, if any robbery, violence, or murder, shall be committed on any Indian or Indians, belonging to the said tribe or nation, the person or persons so offending shall be tried, and, if found guilty, punished in like manner as if the injury had been done to a white man. And it is further agreed, that the chiefs of the said tribe or nation shall, to the utmost of their power, exert themselves to recover horses, or other property, which may be stolen from any citizen or citizens of the United States, by any individual or individuals of the said tribe or nation; and the property so recovered, shall be forthwith delivered to the governor, superintendant, or other person authorized to receive the same, that it may be restored to the proper owner. And in cases where the exertions of the chiefs shall be ineffectual in recovering the property stolen, as aforesaid, if sufficient proof can be obtained that such property was actually stolen by an Indian or Indians, belonging to the said tribe or nation, a sum, equal to the value of the property which has been stolen, may be deducted, by the United States, from the annuity of said tribe

Recovery of stolen property.

Deduction for property stolen to be made from

annuity.

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or nation. And the United States hereby guaranty to the individuals of the said tribe or nation, a full indemnification for any horse or horses, or other property, which may be taken from them by any of their citizens: Provided, the property so stolen cannot be recovered, and that sufficient proof is produced that it was actually stolen by a citizen or citizens of the United States.

ART. 7. This treaty shall take effect, and be obligatory on the contracting parties, as soon as the same shall have been ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate.

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Done at St. Louis, in the presence of R. Wash, Secretary to the Commission. R. Paul, Col. M. M. C. I. Jn. Ruland, Sub Agent, &c. R. Graham, Indian Agent. M. Lewis Clark. L. T. Honore, Indian Interpreter. Joseph Bonne, Interpreter. Julius Pescay. Stephen Julian, U. S. Indian Interpreter. James Loper. William P. Clark.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

Sept. 17, 1818. Proclamation, Jan. 4, 1819.

Ante, p. 160.

The grants in the treaty of

ARTICLES OF A TREATY

Made and concluded, at St. Mary's, in the state of Ohio, between Lewis Cass and Duncan McArthur, commissioners of the United States, with full power and authority to hold conferences, and conclude and sign a treaty or treaties, with all or any of the tribes or nations of Indians within the boundaries of the state of Ohio, of and concerning all matters interesting to the United States and the said nations of Indians, and the sachems, chiefs, and warriors, of the Wyandot, Seneca, Shawnese, and Ottawas, tribes of Indians; being supplementary to the treaty made and concluded with the said tribes, and the Deleware, Potawatamie, and Chippewa, tribes of Indians, at the foot of the Rapids of the Miami of Lake Erie, on the twenty-ninth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventeen.

ART. 1. It is agreed, between the United States and the parties hereunto, that the several tracts of land, described in the treaty to which to be considered this is supplementary, and agreed thereby to be granted by the United only as reserva- States to the chiefs of the respective tribes named therein, for the use tions for the use of the individuals of the said tribes, and also the tract described in the of the Indians. twentieth article of the said treaty, shall not be thus granted, but shall be excepted from the cession made by the said tribes to the United States, reserved for the use of the said Indians, and held by them in the same manner as Indian reservations have been heretofore held. But [it] is further agreed, that the tracts thus reserved shall be reserved for the

use of the Indians named in the schedule to the said treaty, and held by them and their heirs forever, unless ceded to the United States.

Additional re

ART. 2. It is also agreed that there shall be reserved for the use of the Wyandots, in addition to the reservations before made, fifty-five servation for the Wyandots. thousand six hundred and eighty acres of land, to be laid off in two tracts, the first to adjoin the south line of the section of six hundred and forty acres of land heretofore reserved for the Wyandot chief, the Cherokee Boy, and to extend south to the north line of the reserve of twelve miles square, at Upper Sandusky, and the other to adjoin the east line of the reserve of twelve miles square, at Upper Sandusky, and to extend east for quantity.

There shall also be reserved, for the use of the Wyandots residing at Solomon's town, and on Blanchard's fork, in addition to the reservations before made, sixteen thousand acres of land, to be laid off in a square form, on the head of Blanchard's fork, the centre of which shall be at the Big Spring, on the trace leading from Upper Sandusky to fort Findlay; and one hundred and sixty acres of land, for the use of the Wyandots, on the west side of the Sandusky river, adjoining the said river, and the lower line of two sections of land, agreed, by the treaty to which this is supplementary, to be granted to Elizabeth Whitaker.

There shall also be reserved, for the use of the Shawnese, in addition to the reservations before made, twelve thousand eight hundred acres of land, to be laid off adjoining the east line of their reserve of ten miles square, at Wapaughkonetta; and for the use of the Shawnese and Senecas, eight thousand nine hundred and sixty acres of land, to be laid off adjoining the west line of the reserve of forty-eight square miles at Lewistown. And the last reserve hereby made, and the former reserve at the same place, shall be equally divided by an east and west line, to be drawn through the same. And the north half of the said tract shall be reserved for the use of the Senecas who reside there, and the south half for the use of the Shawnese who reside there.

Reservation for Wyandots at Solomon's

town, &c.

Additional re

servation for the Senecas.

Shawnees and

Further reser

Senecas.

There shall also be reserved for the use of the Senecas, in addition to the reservations before made, ten thousand acres of land, to be laid vation for the off on the east side of the Sandusky river, adjoining the south line of their reservation of thirty thousand acres of land, which begins on the Sandusky river, at the lower corner of William Spicer's section, and excluding therefrom the said William Spicer's section.

ART. 3. It is hereby agreed that the tracts of land, which, by the eighth article of the treaty to which this is supplementary, are to be granted by the United States to the persons therein mentioned, shall never be conveyed, by them or their heirs, without the permission of the President of the United States.

ART. 4. The United States agree to pay to the Wyandots an additional annuity of five hundred dollars, forever; to the Shawnese, and to the Senecas of Lewistown, an additional annuity of one thousand dollars, forever; and to the Senecas an additional annuity of five hundred dollars, forever; and to the Ottawas an additional annuity of one thousand five hundred dollars, forever. And these annuities shall be paid at the places, and in the manner, prescribed by the treaty to which this is supplementary.

Grants to cer

tain persons not to be conveyed without permis

Additional an

nuities to the Wyandots, &c.

When to take

ART. 5. This treaty shall take effect, and be obligatory on the contracting parties, as soon as the same shall be ratified by the President effect. of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof.

In testimony whereof, the said Lewis Cass and Duncan McArthur, commissioners as aforesaid, and the sachems, chiefs, and warriors,

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