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of the Wyandot, Seneca, Shawnese, and Ottawa, tribes of Indians, have hereunto set their hands, at St. Mary's, in the state of Ohio, this seventeenth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighteen.

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In presence of Wm. Turner, Secretary. Jno. Johnston, Indian Agent. B. F. Stickney, Indian Agent. B. Parke, District Judge of Indiana. Jonathan Jennings, Governor of Indiana. Alexander Wolcott, jr. Indian Agent, Detroit. John Conner. J. T. Chunn, Major of 3d Infantry. R. A. Forsyth, jr. Sec'ry Indian Department. Wm. P. Rathbone, Army Contractor. G. M. Grosvenor, Captain 3d Infantry.

Sworn Interpreters.

Henry I. Hunt. John Kenzer, Sub Agent. F. Duchouquet. W. Knaggs. A. Shane. Jno. R. Walker. C. Jouett, Indian Agent.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

ARTICLES OF A TREATY

Sept. 20, 1818. Made and concluded, at St. Mary's, in the state of Ohio, between

Proclamation,

Jan. 7, 1819.

Cession of lands.

Lewis Cass, Commissioner of the United States, thereto specially authorized by the President of the United States, and the chiefs und warriors of the Wyandot tribe of Indians.

ART. 1. The Wyandot tribe of Indians hereby cede to the United States all the right reserved to them in two tracts of land, in the territory of Michigan, one including the village called Brownstown, and the other the village called Maguagua, formerly in the possession of the Wyandot tribe of Indians, containing in the whole not more than five thousand acres of land; which two tracts of land were reserved for the use of the said Wyandot tribe of Indians, and their descendants, for the term of fifty years, agreeably to the provisions of the act of Congress,

passed February 28, 1809, and entitled "An act for the relief of certain Alabama and Wyandot Indians.”

ART. 2. In consideration of the preceding cession, the United States will reserve, for the use of the said Wyandott Indians, sections numbered twenty-three, twenty-four, twenty-five, twenty-six, thirty-four, thirty-five, thirty-six, twenty-seven, and that part of section numbered twenty-two, which contains eight acres, and lies on the south side of the river Huron, being in the fourth township, south of the base line, and in the ninth range east of the first meridian, in the territory of Michigan, and containing four thousand nine hundred and ninety-six acres; and the said tract of land shall be reserved for the use of the said Wyandott Indians, and their descendants, and be secured to them in the same manner, and on the same terms and conditions, as is provided in relation to the Alabama Indians, by the first section of the beforementioned act of Congress, except that the said Wyandott Indians, and their descendants, shall hold the said land so long as they or their descendants shall occupy the same.

In testimony whereof the said Lewis Cass, commissioner as aforesaid, and the chiefs and warriors of the said Wyandot tribe of Indians, have hereunto set their hands, at St. Mary's, in the state of Ohio, this twentieth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighteen.

Ronesass, or Honas,

Haunsiaugh, or Boyer,

Ronaess, or Racer,

Scoutash,

LEWIS CASS.

Dunquod, or Half King,

Aronue, or Cherokee Boy,

1809, ch. 23.

Reservation for the use of the Wyandots south of the river Huron.

Ronioness, or Joseph,

Taruntue, or Between the Logs.

In presence of R. A. Forsyth, jun. Secretary to the commissioners. Jno. Johnston, Indian Agent. B. F. Stickney, S. I. A. W. W. Walker, Interpreter. John ConWm. Turner.

ner.

To the Indian names is subjoined a mark.

A TREATY

Made and concluded by, and between, Ninian Edwards and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners on the part and behalf of the United States of America, of the one part, and the undersigned, principal chiefs and warriors of the Peoria, Kaskaskia, Mitchigamia, Cahokia, and Tamarois, tribes of the Illinois nation of Indians, on the part and behalf of the said tribes, of the other part.

WHEREAS, by the treaty made at Vincennes, on the thirteenth day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and three, between the United States, of the one part, and the head chiefs and warriors of the tribe of Indians commonly called the Kaskaskia tribe, but which was composed of, and rightfully represented, the Kaskaskia, Mitchigamia, Cahokia, and Tamarois, tribes of the Illinois nation of Indians, of the other part, a certain tract of land was ceded to the United States, which was supposed to include all the land claimed by those respective tribes, but which did not include, and was not intended to include, the land which was rightfully claimed by the Peoria Indians,

Sept. 25, 1818. Proclamation, Jan. 5, 1819.

Preamble.

Ante, p. 78.

Q

Cession by all the tribes, par

ties to this treaty.

Stipulations in treaty of Vin

cennes to continue obligatory.

U. S. will protect the tribes, parties to this treaty.

Peorias not to make war with

out consent of U.S.

Payment to the Peorias.

The U.S. cede 610 acres of

rias.

a tribe of the Illinois nation, who then did, and still do, live separate and apart from the tribes abovementioned, and who were not represented in the treaty refered to above, nor ever received any part of the consideration given for the cession of land therein mentioned: And whereas the said tribe of Peoria are now also disposed to cede all their land to the United States, and, for the purpose of avoiding any dispute with regard to the boundary of their claim, are willing to unite with the Kaskaskia, Mitchigamia, Cahokia, and Tamarois, tribes, in confirming the cession of land to the United States, which was made by the treaty above refered to, and in extending the cession so as to include all the land claimed by those tribes, and themselves, respectively:

ART. 1. For which purpose the undersigned, head chiefs and warriors of the Peoria, Kaskaskia, Mitchigamia, Čahokia, and Tamarois, tribes of the Illinois nation of Indians, for the considerations hereinafter mentioned, do hereby relinquish, cede, and confirm, to the United States, all the land included within the following boundaries, viz: Beginning at the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers; thence, up the Ohio, to the mouth of Saline creek, about twelve miles below the mouth of the Wabash; thence, along the dividing ridge between the waters of said creek and the Wabash, to the general dividing ridge between the waters which fall into the Wabash and those which fall into the Kaskaskia river; thence, along the said ridge, until it reaches the waters which fall into the Illinois river; thence, a direct line to the confluence of the Kankakee and Maple rivers; thence, down the Illinois river, to its confluence with the Mississippi river, and down the latter to the beginning.

ART. 2. It is mutually agreed, by the parties hereto, that all the stipulations contained in the treaty, above referred to, shall continue binding and obligatory on both parties.

ART. 3. The United States will take the Peoria tribe, as well as the other tribes herein abovementioned, under their immediate care and patronage, and will afford them a protection as effectual, against any other Indian tribes, and against all other persons whatever, as is enjoyed by the citizens of the United States. And the said Peoria tribe do hereby engage to refrain from making war, or giving any insult or offence, to any other Indian tribe, or to any foreign nation, without first having obtained the approbation and consent of the United States.

ART. 4. In addition to two thousand dollars' worth of merchandize, this day paid to the abovementioned tribes of Indians, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, the United States promise to pay to the said Peoria tribe, for the term of twelve years, an annuity of three hundred dollars, in money, merchandize, or domestic animals, at the option of the said tribe; to be delivered at the village of St. Genevieve, in the territory of Missouri.

ART. 5. The United States agree to cede, to the said Peoria tribe, six hundred and forty acres of land, including their village on Blackwater land to the Peo- river, in the territory of Missouri; provided that the said tract is not included within a private claim; but should that be the case, then some other tract of equal quantity and value shall be designated for said tribe, at such place as the President of the United States may direct. And the said Peoria tribe hereby agree to accept the same, together with the presents now given them, and the annuity hereby promised them, as a full equivalent for all and every tract of land to which they have any pretence of right or title.

Peorias accept the presents, &c. in full for

all their claims.

In testimony whereof, the commissioners aforesaid, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors as aforesaid, have hereunto subscribed their names and affixed their seals. Done at Edwardsville, in the state of Illinois, this twenty-fifth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighteen, and of the Independence of the United States the forty-third.

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Done in presence of Pascal Cerré, secretary to the commissioners. Abraham Prickett, B. Stephenson, John M. Kee, Joseph Conway, Josias Randle, Ebenezer Baldwin, Reuben H. Walworth, William Swettand, John Kain, R. Pulliam, John Gaither, Bucknett, Jacob Prickett, John Wilson, William P. M-Kee, James Watts, John Howard, Richard Brevoofield, Robert Pogue, James Mason, Jno. Shinn, jun., John H. Randle, Edmund Randle.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

A TREATY

Made and concluded by, and between, William Clark, governor of the Missouri Territory, superintendent of Indian affairs, and commissioner in behalf of the United States, of the one part; and a full and complete deputation of considerate men, chiefs, and warriors, of all the several bands of the Great and Little Osage nation, assembled in behalf of their said nation, of the other part; have agreed to the following articles :

ART. 1. WHEREAS the Osage nations have been embarrassed by the frequent demands for property taken from the citizens of the United States, by war parties, and other thoughtless men of their several bands, (both before and since their war with the Cherokees,) and as the exertions of their chiefs have been ineffectual in recovering and delivering such property, conformably with the condition of the ninth article of a treaty, entered into with the United States, at Fort Clark, the tenth of November, one thousand eight hundred and eight; and as the deductions from their annuities, in conformity to the said article, would deprive them of any for several years, and being destitute of funds to do that justice to the citizens of the United States which is calculated to promote a friendly intercourse, they have agreed, and do hereby agree, to

Sept. 25, 1818.

Proclamation,

Jan. 7, 1819.

Ante, p. 107.

Cession to the U. S. of a tract of country within the bounds mentioned.

U. S. to pay for certain losses sustained by their citizens.

These articles

to be considered as permanent additions to for

mer treaties.

cede to the United States, and forever quit claim to, the tract of country included within the following bounds, to wit: Beginning at the Arkansaw river, at where the present Osage boundary line strikes the river at Frog Bayou; then up the Arkansaw and Verdigris, to the falls of Verdigris river; thence, eastwardly, to the said Osage boundary line, at a point twenty leagues north from the Arkansaw river; and, with that line, to the place of beginning.

ART. 2. The United States, on their part, and in consideration of the above cession, agree, in addition to the amount which the Osage do now receive in money and goods, to pay their own citizens the full value of such property as they can legally prove to have been stolen or destroyed by the said Osage, since the year one thousand eight hundred and fourteen: provided the same does not exceed the sum of four thousand dollars.

ART. 3. The articles now stipulated will be considered as permanent additions to the treaties, now in force, between the contracting parties, as soon as they shall have been ratified by the President of the United States of America, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate of the said United States.

In witness whereof the said William Clark, Commissioner as aforesaid, and the considerate men and chiefs aforesaid, have hereunto subscribed their names, and affixed their seals, at St. Louis, this twenty-fifth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighteen, and of the Independance of the United States the forty-third.

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Signed, sealed, and delivered, in the presence of Pierre Chouteau. Pierre Menard, Ind. Agent. Jno. Ruland, Sub Agent. P. L. Chouteau, Interpreter. Paul Loise, Interpreter Osage. I. T. Honore, Indian Interpreter. Meriwether Lewis Clark.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

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