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The above instrument was executed in open Cherokee council, in my office, in January, 1817.

(Signed)

Cherokee Agency, 8th July, 1817.

RETURN J. MEIGS.

The use of the Unicoy road, so called, was for twenty years.

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1 certify I believe the within to be a correct copy of the original. CH. HICKS.

Washington City, March 1, 1819.

A TREATY

July 30, 1819. Made and concluded at Edwardsville, in the State of Illinois,

Proclamation, Jan. 13, 1821.

The tribe cede tracts of land.

Land ceded.

Boundaries of other land ceded.

Confirmation

of former treaties, &c.

Ante, p. 185.

between Auguste Chouteau, and Benjamin Stephenson, Commissioners on the part and behalf of the United States of America, of the one part, and the undersigned principal Chiefs and Warriors of the Kickapoo Tribe of Indians, on the part and behalf of said Tribe, of the other part.

ART. 1. The undersigned Chiefs and Warriors, for themselves and their said tribe, for, and in consideration of, the promises and stipulations hereinafter made, do hereby cede and relinquish to the United States for ever, all their right, interest, and title, of, in, and to, the following tracts of land, viz:

All their land on the southeast side of the Wabash river, including the principal village in which their ancestors formerly resided, consisting of a large tract, to which they have had, from time immemorial, and now have, a just right; that they have never heretofore ceded, or otherwise disposed of, in any manner whatever.

Also, all the land within the following boundaries, viz: Beginning on the Wabash river, at the upper point of their cession, made by the second article of their treaty at Vincennes, on the 9th December, 1809; running thence, northwestwardly, to the dividing line between the states of Illinois and Indiana; thence, along said line, to the Kankakee river; thence, with said river, to the Illinois river; thence, down the latter, to its mouth; thence, with a direct line, to the northwest corner of the Vincennes tract, as recognised in the treaty with the Piankeshaw tribe of Indians at Vincennes, on the 30th December, 1805; and thence, with the western and northern boundaries of the cessions heretofore made by the said Kickapoo tribe of Indians, to the beginning. Of which last described tract of land, the said Kickapoo tribe claim a large portion, by descent from their ancestors, and the balance by conquest from the Illinois nation, and uninterrupted possession for more than half a century.

ART. 2. The said tribe hereby confirm all their former treaties with the United States, and relinquish to them all claim to every portion of their lands which may have been ceded by any other tribe or tribes, and all and every demand which they might have had, in consequence of the second article of the treaty made with the Pottawattamy nation of Indians at St. Mary's, on the 2d October, 1818.

Protection of

ART. 3. The said tribe acknowledge themselves now to be, and promise to continue, under the protection of the United States of America, U. S. acknowledged. and of no other nation, power, or sovereign, whatever. ART. 4. The said tribe release the United States from all obligations U.S. released imposed by any treaties heretofore made with them.

ART. 5. The United States, in lieu of all former stipulations, and in consideration of cessions of land heretofore made by the said tribe, promise to pay them, at their town on the waters of the Osage river, two thousand dollars in silver, annually, for fifteen successive years.

ART. 6. In consideration of the cession made by the aforesaid tribe, in the first article of this treaty, the United States, in addition to three thousand dollars worth of merchandise this day paid to the said tribe, hereby cede to them, and their heirs for ever, a certain tract of land lying in the territory of Missouri, and included within the following boundaries, viz: Beginning at the confluence of the rivers Pommes de Terre and Osage; thence, up said river Pommes de Terre, to the dividing ridge which separates the waters of Osage and White rivers; thence, with said ridge, and westwardly, to the Osage line; thence, due north with said line, to Nerve creek; thence, down the same, to a point due south of the Mouth of White Clay, or Richard Creek; thence, north, to the Osage river; thence, down said river, to the beginning: Provided, nevertheless, That the said tribe shall never sell the said land without the consent of the President of the United States.

ART. 7. The United States promise to guaranty to the said tribe the peaceable possession of the tract of land hereby ceded to them, and to restrain and prevent all white persons from hunting, settling, or other wise intruding upon it. But any citizen or citizens of the United States, being lawfully authorized for that purpose, shall be permitted to pass and repass through the said tract, and to navigate the waters thereof, without any hindrance, toll, or exaction, from the said tribe.

from obliga

tions. Annuity to Indians.

U.S. pay $3000 worth of merchandise, and cede a tract of land in Missouri, &c.

Proviso.

U.S. guaranty peaceable pos

session of the

tract ceded.

U.S. to furnish

ART. 8. For the purpose of facilitating the removal of the said tribe to the tract of land hereby ceded to them, the United States will furnish boats, &c. them with two boats, well manned, to transport their property, from any point they may designate on the Illinois river, and some judicious citizen shall be selected to accompany them, in their passage through the white settlements, to their intended residence.

ART. 9. The United States will take the said Kickapoo tribe under their care and patronage, and will afford them protection against all persons whatever, provided they conform to the laws of the United States, and refrain from making war, or giving any insult or offence to any other Indian tribe, or to any foreign nation, without first having obtained the approbation and consent of the United States.

ART. 10. The said tribe, in addition to their above described cessions, do hereby cede and relinquish to the United States, generally, and without reservation, all other tracts of land to which they have any right or title on the left side of the Illinois and Mississippi rivers. In testimony whereof, the Commissioners aforesaid, and the undersigned Chiefs and Warriors as aforesaid, have hereunto subscribed their names and affixed their seals.

Done at Edwardsville, in the state of Illinois, this thirtieth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and nineteen, and of the Independence of the United States the fortyfourth.

AUG. CHOUTEAU,
BEN. STEPHENSON.

U. S. will take

the Kickapoos

under their protection.

The tribe re

linquish all
left of the Illi-

tracts on the

nois and Mississippi.

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Signed, sealed, and delivered, in presence of the following witnesses: Pascal Cerre, Secretary to the Commissioners. Jacques Mette, Interpreter. Ninian Edwards, John Dew, Thornton Peeples, Tillery Merrick, Dan. D. Smith, Isaac A. Douglass, Edmund Randle, Palemon H. Wenchester, N. Buckmaster, Thomas Harcens, Henry Head, John Wilson, Joseph Doer, Elbert Perry, Joseph Remington, J. L. Barton, David Roach, William Head, John Lee Williams, Wm. W. Hickman, Jacob Prickett, James Watt, Joseph B. Lewis, Jona. H. Pugh, William P. McKee, Stephen Johnson, Nathan Clampet, Reuben Hopkins, Joseph Newman.

To the Indian names are subjoined marks.

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A TREATY

Made and concluded by Benjamin Parke, a commissioner on the part of the United States of America, of the one part, and the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the tribe of Kickapoos of the Vermilion, of the other part.

ART. 1. The Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the said tribe, agree to cede, and hereby relinquish, to the United States, all the lands which the said tribe has heretofore possessed, or which they may rightfully claim, on the Wabash river, or any of its waters.

ART. 2. And to the end that the United States may be enabled to fix with the other Indian tribes a boundary between their respective claims, the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the said tribe, do hereby declare, that their rightfull claim is as follows, viz: beginning at the northwest corner of the Vincennes tract; thence, westwardly, by the boundary established by a treaty with the Piankeshaws, on the thirtieth day of December, eighteen hundred and five, to the dividing ridge. between the waters of the Embarras and the Little Wabash; thence, by the said ridge, to the source of the Vermilion river; thence, by the same ridge, to the head of Pine creek; thence, by the said creek, to the Wabash river; thence, by the said river, to the mouth of the Vermilion river, and thence by the Vermilion, and the boundary heretofore established, to the place of beginning.

ART. 3. The said Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the said tribe, agree to relinquish, and they do hereby exonerate and discharge the United States from, the annuity of one thousand dollars, to which they are now entitled. In consideration whereof, and of the cession hereby made, the United States agree to pay the said tribe two thousand dollars annually, in specie, for ten years; which, together with three thousand dollars now delivered, is to be considered a full compensation for the cession hereby made, as also of all annuities, or other claims, of the said tribe against the United States, by virtue of any treaty with the said United States.

ART. 4. As the said tribe contemplate removing from the country they now occupy, the annuity herein provided for shall be paid at such place as may be hereinafter agreed upon between the United States and said tribe.

Annuity, where to be paid. Post, p. 210.

when ratified.

ART. 5. This treaty, after the same shall be ratified by the President Treaty binding and Senate of the United States, shall be binding on the contracting parties.

In testimony whereof, the said Benjamin Parke, commissioner as aforesaid, and the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the said tribe, have hereunto set their hands, at Fort Harrison, the thirtieth day of August, in the year eighteen hundred and nineteen.

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James C.

In the presence of Jno. Law, Secretary to the Commissioner. William Prince,
Indian Agent. William Markle.
Turner. Samuel L. Richardson.

Andrew Brooks. Pierre Laplante.
Michel Brouillet, U. S. Interpreter.

To the Indian names are subjoined marks.

ARTICLES OF A TREATY

Made and concluded at Saginaw, in the Territory of Michigan, Sept. 24, 1819. between the United States of America, by their Commissioner, Lewis Cass, and the Chippewa nation of Indians.

ART. 1. The Chippewa nation of Indians, in consideration of the stipulations herein made on the part of the United States, do hereby, forever, cede to the United States the land comprehended within the following lines and boundaries: Beginning at a point in the present Indian boundary line, which runs due north from the mouth of the great Auglaize river, six miles south of the place where the base line, so called, intersects the same; thence, west, sixty miles; thence, in a direct line, to the head of Thunder Bay River; thence, down the same, following the courses thereof, to the mouth; thence, northeast, to the boundary line between the United States and the British Province of Upper Canada; thence, with the same, to the line established by the treaty of Detroit, in the year one thousand eight hundred and seven; thence, with the said line, to the place of beginning.

ART. 2. From the cession aforesaid the following tracts of land shall be reserved, for the use of the Chippewa nation of Indians:

One tract, of eight thousand acres, on the east side of the river Au Sable, near where the Indians now live.

One tract, of two thousand acres, on the river Mesagwisk.

One tract, of six thousand acres, on the north side of the river Kawkawling, at the Indian village.

One tract, of five thousand seven hundred and sixty acres, upon the Flint river, to include Reaum's village, and a place called Kishkawbawee.

Proclamation, March 25, 1820.

The Chippewas cede land to U. S.

Bounds of the

cession.

Reservations from the cession.

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One tract, of eight thousand acres, on the head of the river Huron, which empties into the Saginaw river, at the village of Otusson. One island in the Saginaw Bay.

One tract, of two thousand acres, where Nabobask formerly lived. One tract, of one thousand acres, near the island in the Saginaw river.

One tract, of six hundred and forty acres, at the bend of the river Huron, which empties into the Saginaw river.

One tract, of two thousand acres, at the mouth of Point Augrais river. One tract, of one thousand acres, on the river Huron, at Menoequet's village.

One tract, of ten thousand acres, on the Shawassee river, at a place called the Big Rock.

One tract, of three thousand acres, on the Shawassee river, at Ketchewaundaugenink.

One tract, of six thousand acres, at the Little Forks on the Tetabawasink river.

One tract of six thousand acres, at the Black Bird's town, on the Tetabawasink river.

One tract, of forty thousand acres, on the west side of the Saginaw river, to be hereafter located.

ART. 3. There shall be reserved, for the use of each of the persons hereinafter mentioned and their heirs, which persons are all Indians by descent, the following tracts of land:

For the use of John Riley, the son of Menawcumegoqua, a Chippewa woman, six hundred and forty acres of land, beginning at the head of the first marsh above the mouth of the Saginaw river, on the east side thereof.

For the use of Peter Riley, the son of Menawcumegoqua, a Chippewa woman, six hundred and forty acres of land, beginning above and adjoining the apple trees on the west side of the Saginaw river, and running up the same for quantity.

For the use of James Riley, the son of Menawcumegoqua, a Chippewa woman, six hundred and forty acres, beginning on the east side of the Saginaw river, nearly opposite to Campeau's trading house, and running up the river for quantity.

For the use of Kawkawiskou, or the Crow, a Chippewa chief, six hundred and forty acres of land, on the east side of the Saginaw river, at a place called Menitegow, and to include, in the said six hundred and forty acres, the island opposite to the said place.

For the usa of Nowokeshik, Metawanene, Mokitchenoqua, Nondashemau, Petabonaqua, Messawwakut, Checbalk, Kitchegeequa, Sagosequa, Annoketoqua, and Tawcumegoqua, each, six hundred and forty acres of land, to be located at and near the grand traverse of the Flint river, in such manner as the President of the United States may direct. For the use of the children of Bokowtonden, six hundred and forty acres, on the Kawkawling river.

ART. 4. In consideration of the cession aforesaid, the United States agree to pay to the Chippewa nation of Indians, annually, for ever, the sum of one thousand dollars in silver; and do also agree that all annuities due by any former treaty to the said tribe, shall be hereafter paid in silver.

ART. 5. The stipulation contained in the treaty of Greenville, relative to the right of the Indians to hunt upon the land ceded, while it continues the property of the United States, shall apply to this treaty; and the Indians shall, for the same term, enjoy the privilege of making sugar upon the same land, committing no unnecessary waste upon the trees.

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