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Grants not transferable without consent.

Tracts to be located after survey.

Payment for said cession.

To Madeline Bertrand, wife of Joseph Bertrand, a Potawatamie woman, one section of land at the Parc aux Vaches, on the north side of the river St. Joseph.

To Joseph Bertrand, junior, Benjamin Bertrand, Laurent Bertrand, Theresa Bertrand, and Amable Bertrand, children of the said Madeline Bertrand, each one half of a section of land at the portage of the Kankakee river.

To John Riley, son of Me-naw-cum-a-go-quoi, one section of land, at the mouth of the river Au Foin, on the Grand River, and extending up the said River.

To Peter Riley, the son of Me-naw-cum-e-go-qua, one section of land, at the mouth of the river Au Foin, on the Grand River, and extending down the said river.

To Jean B. Le Clerc, son of Moi-qua, one half of a section of land, above and adjoining the tract granted to Pierre Le Clerc.

To Joseph La Framboise, son of Shaw-we-no-qua, one section of land upon the south side of the river St. Joseph, and adjoining on the upper side the land ceded to the United States, which said section is also ceded to the United States.

The Tracts of Land herein stipulated to be granted, shall never be leased or conveyed by the grantees or their heirs to any persons whatever, without the permission of the President of the United States. And such tracts shall be located after the said cession is surveyed, and in conformity with such surveys as near as may be, and in such manner as the President may direct.

ART. 4. In consideration of the cession aforesaid, the United States engage to pay to the Ottawa nation, one thousand dollars in specie annually forever, and also to appropriate annually, for the term of ten years, the sum of fifteen hundred dollars, to be expended as the President may direct, in the support of a Blacksmith, of a Teacher, and of a person to instruct the Ottawas in agriculture and in the purchase of cattle and farming utensils. And the United States also engage to pay to the Potawatamie nation five thousand dollars in specie, annually, for the term of twenty years, and also to appropriate annually, for the term of fifteen years, the sum of one thousand dollars, to be expended as the President may direct, in the support of a Blacksmith and a Teacher. Land to be re- And one mile square shall be selected, under the direction of the President, on the north side of the Grand River, and one mile square on the south side of the St. Joseph, and within the Indian lands not ceded, upon which the blacksmiths and teachers employed for the said tribes, respectively, shall reside.

served for blacksmiths

and teachers.

Right of Indians to hunt on

land ceded.

U. S. may make a road through Indian country.

Treaty binding when ratified.

ART. 5. The stipulation contained in the treaty of Greenville, relative to the right of the Indians to hunt upon the land ceded while it continues the property of the United States, shall apply to this treaty.

ART. 6. The United States shall have the privilege of making and using a road through the Indian country, from Detroit and Fort Wayne, respectively, to Chicago.

ART. 7. This Treaty shall take effect and be obligatory on the contracting parties, so soon as the same shall be ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advise and consent of the Senate thereof.

In testimony whereof, the said Lewis Cass and Solomon Sibley, Commissioners as aforesaid, and the Chiefs and Warriors of the said Ottawa, Chippewa, and Potawatamie nations, have hereunto set

their hands, at Chicago aforesaid, this 29th day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-one.

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LEWIS CASS,

SOLOMON SIBLEY.

Quay-guee,

Aa-pen-naw-bee,
Mat-cha-wee-yaas,

Mat-cha-pag-gish,
Mongaw,
Pug-gay-gaus,
Ses-cobe-mesh,

Chee-gwa-mack-gwa-go,
Waw-seb-baw,

Pee-chee-co,
Quoi-quoi-taw,
Pe-an-nish,
Wy-ne-maig,
O-nuck-ke-meck,
Ka-way-sin,
A-meck-kose,
Os-see-meet,
Shaw-ko-to,
No-shay-we-quat,
Mee-gwun,

Mesh-she-ke-ten-now,

Kee-no-to-go,

Wa-baw-nee-she,

Shaw-waw-nay-see,

Atch-wee-muck-quee,

Pish-she-baw-gay,

Waw-ba-saye,

Meg-ges-seese,

Say-gaw-koo-nuck,

Shaw-way-no,

Shee-shaw-gun,

To-to-mee,
Ash-kee-wee,

Shay-auk-ke-bee,
Aw-be-tone.

In presence of Alex. Wolcott, jr. Indian Agent. Jno. R. Williams, Adjt. Gen. M. Ma. G. Godfroy, Indian Agent. W. Knaggs, Indian Agent. Jacob Visger. Henry L. Hunt. H. Phillips, Paymr. U. S. Army. R. Montgomery. Jacob B. Varnum, U. S. Factor. John B. Beaubien. Conrad Ten Eyck. J. Whippley. George Miles, jun. Henry Connor. Jas. Barnerd. John Kenzie, Sub-Agent,

To the Indian names are subjoined marks.

The tract at

The tract reserved at the village of Match-e-be-nash-she-wish, at the head of the Ke-kal-i-ma-zoo river, was by agreement to be three miles Matchebenashsquare. The extent of the reservation was accidentally omitted.

LEWIS CASS,
SOLOMON SIBLEY.

she wish to be 3 miles square.

T2

ARTICLES OF A TREATY,

Aug. 31, 1822. Entered into and concluded at the United States' Factory on the

Proclamation, Feb. 13, 1823.

The second article of the treaty of Nov.

10, 1808, abrogated; conside

ration.

Ante, p. 107.

M. De Cigue Augt. by and between Richard Graham, Agent of Indian Affairs, authorized on the part of the United States for that purpose, and the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the Tribes of Great and Little Osage Indians, for themselves and their respective Tribes, of the other part.

WHEREAS, by the second article of the Treaty made and entered into between the United States and the Great and Little Osage nation of Indians, concluded and signed at Fort Clark, on the Missouri, on the tenth day of November, one thousand eight hundred and eight, it is stipulated that the United States shall establish at that place, and permanently continue, at all seasons of the year, a well assorted store of goods, for the purpose of bartering with them on moderate terms for their peltries and furs: Now, we, the said Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, in behalf of our said Tribes, for and in consideration of two thousand three hundred and twenty-nine dollars and forty cents, to us now paid in merchandize, out of the United States' Factory, by said Richard Graham, on behalf of the United States, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, do exonerate, release, and forever discharge, the United States from the obligation contained in the said second article above mentioned; and the aforesaid second article is, from the date hereof, abrogated and of no effect.

In witness whereof, the said Richard Graham and the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the Great and Little Osage Tribes, have hereunto set their hands and affixed their seals, this thirty-first day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-two.

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ARTICLES OF A TREATY

Entered into and concluded at Fort Armstrong, by and between Thomas Forsyth, Agent of Indian Affairs, authorized on the part of the United States for that purpose, of the one part, and the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the United Sac and Fox Tribes, for themselves and their Tribes, of the other part.

WHEREAS by the ninth article of the Treaty made and entered into between the United States and the Sac and Fox Tribes of Indians, concluded and signed at Saint Louis, in the District of Louisiana, on the third day of November, one thousand eight hundred and four, it is stipulated, in order to put a stop to the abuses and impositions which are practised upon the said Tribes by the private traders, the United States will, at a convenient time, establish a trading house or factory, where the individuals of the said Tribes can be supplied with goods at a more reasonable rate than they have been accustomed to procure them. Now, We, the said Chiefs, Warriors, and head men of the said Tribes, for and in consideration of the sum of one thousand dollars to us, now paid in merchandize out of the United States' Factory, by said Thomas Forsyth, on behalf of the United States, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, do exonerate, release, and forever discharge, the United States from the obligation contained in the said ninth article above recited, and the aforesaid ninth article is, from the date hereof, abrogated and of no effect.

In witness whereof the said Thomas Forsyth, and the Chiefs, Warriors, and head men, of the Sac and Fox Tribes, have hereunto set their hands, and affixed their seals, this third day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-two.

THOMAS FORSYTH,
United States' Indian Agent.

Wapulla,
Themue,

Sept. 3, 1822.

Proclamation,

Feb. 13, 1823.

Ninth article

of treaty of 3d Nov. 1804, ab

rogated; consideration.

Ante, p. 84.

Pushee Paho,
Quash Quammee,

Nesowakee,

Keeocuck,

Mucathaanamickee,

Nolo.

In the presence of S. Burbank, Major United States' Army. P. W. Craig, Assistant Surgeon United States' Army. J. M. Baxley, Lieutenant 5th Infantry. George Davenport. Samuel C. Muir. John Connolly. Louis Betelle, Interpreter. To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

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Sept. 18, 1823. TREATY WITH THE FLORIDA TRIBES OF INDIANS.

Proclamation,

Jan. 2, 1824.

Said Indians to continue under the protection of U. S.

Said Indians to be confined to the following metes and bounds.

U.S. to take the Florida Indians under

their care, &c.

U. S. to gua

ranty peaceable

possession of the district assigned them, on certain conditions.

Corn, meat, &c. to be al

ARTICLE I. THE undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their tribes, have appealed to the humanity, and thrown themselves on, and have promised to continue under, the protection of the United States, and of no other nation, power, or sovereign; and, in consideration of the promises and stipulations hereinafter made, do cede and relinquish all claim or title which they may have to the whole territory of Florida, with the exception of such district of country as shall herein be allotted to them.

ARTICLE II. The Florida tribes of Indians will hereafter be concentrated and confined to the following metes and boundaries: commencing five miles north of Okehumke, running in a direct line to a point five miles west of Setarky's settlement, on the waters of Amazura, (or Withlahuchie river,) leaving said settlement two miles south of the line; from thence, in a direct line, to the south end of the Big Hammock, to include Chickuchate; continuing, in the same direction, for five miles beyond the said Hammock-provided said point does not approach nearer than fifteen miles the sea coast of the Gulf of Mexico; if it does, the said line will terminate at that distance from the sea coast; thence, south, twelve miles; thence in a south 30° east direction, until the same shall strike within five miles of the main branch of Charlotte river; thence, in a due east direction, to within twenty miles of the Atlantic coast; thence, north, fifteen west, for fifty miles and from this last, to the beginning point.

ARTICLE III. The United States will take the Florida Indians under their care and patronage, and will afford them protection against all persons whatsoever; provided they conform to the laws of the United States, and refrain from making war, or giving any insult to any foreign nation, without having first obtained the permission and consent of the United States: And, in consideration of the appeal and cession made in the first article of this treaty, by the aforesaid chiefs and warriors, the United States promise to distribute among the tribes, as soon as concentrated, under the direction of their agent, implements of husbandry, and stock of cattle and hogs, to the amount of six thousand dollars, and an annual sum of five thousand dollars a year, for twenty successive years, to be distributed as the President of the United States shall direct, through the Secretary of War, or his Superintendents and Agent of Indian affairs.

ARTICLE IV. The United States promise to guaranty to the said tribes the peaceable possession of the district of country herein assigned them, reserving the right of opening through it such roads, as may, from time to time, be deemed necessary; and to restrain and prevent all white persons from hunting, settling, or otherwise intruding upon it. But any citizen of the United States, being lawfully authorized for that purpose, shall be permitted to pass and repass through the said district, and to navigate the waters thereof, without any hindrance, toll, or exaction, from said tribes.

ARTICLE V. For the purpose of facilitating the removal of the said tribes to the district of country allotted them, and, as a compensation twelve months. for the losses sustained, or the inconveniences to which they may be

lowed them for

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