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of the United States, and disclaim all dependence upon, and connection with, any other power. And the United States agree to, and re- knowledge the cognize, the preceding boundaries, subject to the limitations and restric- the U.S. supremacy of tions before provided. It being, however, well understood that the reservations at Fever River, at the Ouisconsin, and St. Peters, and the ancient settlements at Prairie des Chiens and Green Bay, and the land property thereto belonging, and the reservations made upon the Mississippi, for the use of the half breeds, in the treaty concluded with the Sacs and Foxes, August 24, 1824, are not claimed by either of the said tribes.

ARTICLE 11.

The United States agree, whenever the President may think it necessary and proper, to convene such of the tribes, either separately or together, as are interested in the lines left unsettled herein, and to recommend to them an amicable and final adjustment of their respective claims, so that the work, now happily begun, may be consummated. It is agreed, however, that a Council shall be held with the Yancton band of the Sioux, during the year 1826, to explain to them the stipulations of this treaty, and to procure their assent thereto, should they be disposed to give it, and also with the Ottoes, to settle and adjust their title to any of the country claimed by the Sacs, Foxes, and Ioways.

ARTICLE 12.

The Chippewa tribe being dispersed over a great extent of country, and the Chiefs of that tribe having requested, that such portion of them as may be thought proper, by the Government of the United States, may be assembled in 1826, upon some part of Lake Superior, that the objects and advantages of this treaty may be fully explained to them, so that the stipulations thereof may be observed by the warriors. The Commissioners of the United States assent thereto, and it is therefore agreed that a council shall accordingly be held for these purposes.

ARTICLE 13.

It is understood by all the tribes, parties hereto, that no tribe shall hunt within the acknowledged limits of any other without their assent, but it being the sole object of this arrangement to perpetuate a peace among them, and amicable relations being now restored, the Chiefs of all the tribes have expressed a determination, cheerfully to allow a reciprocal right of hunting on the lands of one another, permission being first asked and obtained, as before provided for.

ARTICLE 14.

Ante, p. 229.

A council to

be held in 1826.

An assembly

of the Chippevened.

was to be con

No tribe to hunt within the acknowledged limits of any other, without their assent.

In case of diffi

the tribes.

Should any causes of difficulty hereafter unhappily arise between any of the tribes, parties hereunto, it is agreed that the other tribes shall culty between interpose their good offices to remove such difficulties; and also that the government of the United States may take such measures as they may deem proper, to effect the same object.

ARTICLE 15.

When to take

This treaty shall be obligatory on the tribes, parties hereto, from and after the date hereof, and on the United States, from and after its rati- effect. fication by the government thereof.

Done and signed and sealed at Prairie des Chiens, in the Territory of Michigan, this nineteenth day of August, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-five, and of the Independence of the United States the fiftieth.

WILLIAM CLARK,
LEWIS CASS.

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Les-quatres-gambes.

Carimine, the turtle that walks.
De-ca-ri.

Wan-ca-ha-ga, or snake's skin.
Sa-sa-ma-ni.

Wa-non-che-qua, the merchant.
Chon-que-pa, or dog's head.
Cha-rat-chon, the smoker.

Ca-ri-ca-si-ca, he that kills the crow.

Watch-kat-o-que, the grand canoe. Ho-wa-mick-a, the little elk.

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Mush-Koas, or the elk of Fond du Lac. Nau-bun, Aqueezhiok, of Fond du Lac. Kau-ta-waubeta, or broken tooth of Sandy Lake.

Pugisaingegen, or broken arm of Sandy Lake.

Kwee-weezaishish, or Gross Guelle of

Sandy Lake.

Ba-ba-see-kem-dase, or curling hair of Sandy Lake.

Paashineep, or man shooting at the mark of Sandy Lake.

Pu-ga-a-gik, the little beef Leech Lake.
Pee-sec-ker, or buffaloe St. Croix band,
Nau-din, or the wind St. Croix band.
Nau-quan-a-bee, of Mille Lac.
Tu-kau-bis-hoo, or crouching lynk of Lac
Courte Orielle.

The Red Devil, of Lac Courte Orielle.
The Track, of Lac Courte Orielle.
Ne-bo-na-bee, the mermaid Lac Courte
Orielle.

Pi-a-gick, the single man St. Croix.
Pu-in-a-ne-gi, or the hole on the day
Sandy Lake.

Moose-o-mon-e, plenty of elk St. Croix band.

Nees-o-pe-na, or two birds of Upper Red
Cedar Lake,

Shaata, the pelican of Leech Lake.
Che-on-o-quet, the great cloud of Leech

Lake.

I-au-ben-see, the little buck of Red Lake.
Kia-wa-tas, the tarrier of Leech Lake.
Mau-ge-ga-bo, the leader of Leech Lake.
Nan-go-tuck, the flame of Leech Lake.
Nee-si-day-sish, the sky of Red Lake.
Pee-chan-a-nim, striped feather of Sandy
Lake.

White Devil, of Leech Lake.

Ka-ha-ka, the sparrow Lac Courte Orielle.
I-au-be-ence, little buck of Rice Lake.
Ca-ba-ma-bee, the assembly of St. Croix.
Nau-qua-nosh, the forward man Lake

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Na-o-tuk, the stabbing chief.
Pish-ken-au-nee, all fish.
Po-ko-nau-qua, or broken arm.
Wau-cau-che, eagle nose.
Quash-kaume, jumping fish.
Ochaach, the fisher.

Ke-o-kuck, the watchful fox.

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WITNESSES.-Thomas Biddle, Secretary. R. A. McCabe, Capt. 5th Inf. R. A. Forsyth. N. Borlvin, U. S. Ind. Ag. C. C. Trowbridge, Sub. Ind. Agent. Henry R. Schoolcraft, U. S. Ind. Agent. B. F. Harney, Surg. U. S. A. W. B. Alexander. Sub. Ind. Agent. Thomas Forsyth, Agent Ind. Aff. Maurice Blondaux. David Bailey. James M.Ilvaine, Lieut. U. S. Army. Law Taliaferro, Ind. Agent for Upper Mississippi. John Holiday. William Dickson. S. Campbell, U. S. Interpreter. J. A. Lewis. William Holiday. Dunable Dinglay. Bela Chapman.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

TREATY

With the Ottoe and Missouri Tribe.

For the purpose of perpetuating the friendship which has heretofore existed, as also to remove all future cause of discussion or dissension, as it respects trade and friendship between the United States and their citizens, and the Ottoe and Missouri tribe of Indians, the President of the United States of America, by Brigadier-General Henry Atkinson, of the United States' army, and Major Benjamin O'Fallon, Indian Agent, with full powers and authority, specially appointed and commissioned for that purpose, of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs, Head-men, and Warriors, of the said Ottoe and Missouri tribe of Indians, on behalf of their tribe, of the other part, have made and entered into the following articles and conditions, which, when ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall be binding on both parties—to wit:

ARTICLE 1.

It is admitted by the Ottoe and Missouri tribe of Indians, that they reside within the territorial limits of the United States, acknowledge their supremacy, and claim their protection. The said tribe also admit the right of the United States to regulate all trade and intercourse with them.

ARTICLE 2.

Sept. 26, 1825.

Proclamation, Feb. 6, 1826.

Supremacy of U. S. acknowledged.

Protection of U. S. extended

The United States agree to receive the Ottoe and Missouri tribe of Indians into their friendship, and under their protection, and to to them. Y

Places for trade

to be designated by the President.

Regulation of trade with Indians.

Course to be pursued in order to prevent injuries by individuals, &c.

Chiefs to exert themselves to recover stolen property.

Proviso.

extend to them, from time to time, such benefits and acts of kindness as may be convenient, and seem just and proper to the President of the United States.

ARTICLE 3.

All trade and intercourse with the Ottoe and Missouri tribe shall be transacted at such place or places as may be designated and pointed out by the President of the United States, through his agents; and none but American citizens, duly authorized by the United States, shall be admitted to trade or hold intercourse with said tribe of Indians.

ARTICLE 4.

That the Ottoe and Missouri tribe may be accommodated with such articles of merchandize, &c. as their necessaties may demand, the United States agree to admit and licence traders to hold intercourse with said tribe, under mild and equitable regulations: in consideration of which, the said Ottoe and Missouri tribe bind themselves to extend protection to the persons and the property of the traders, and the persons legally employed under them, whilst they remain within the limits of their particular district of country. And the said Ottoe and Missouri tribe further agree, that if any foreigner or other person, not legally authorized by the United States, shall come into their district of country, for the purposes of trade or other views, they will apprehend such person or persons, and deliver him or them to some United States' superintendent, or agent of Indian Affairs, or to the Commandant of the nearest military post, to be dealt with according to law. And they further agree to give safe conduct to all persons who may be legally authorized by the United States to pass through their country and to protect, in their persons and property, all agents or other persons sent by the United States to reside temporarily among them; nor will they, whilst on their distant excursions, molest or interrupt any American citizen or citizens who may be passing from the United States to New Mexico, or returning from thence to the United States.

ARTICLE 5.

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That the friendship which is now established between the United States and the Ottoe and Missouri tribe should not be interrupted by the misconduct of individuals, it is hereby agreed, that for injuries done by individuals, no private revenge or retaliation shall take place, but instead thereof, complaint shall be made, by the party injured, to the superintendent or agent of Indian affairs, or other person appointed by the President; and it shall be the duty of said Chiefs, upon complaint being made as aforesaid, to deliver up the person or persons against whom the complaint is made, to the end that he or they may be punished agreeably to the laws of the United States. And, in like manner, if any robbery, violence, or murder, shall be committed on any Indian or Indians belonging to said tribe, the person or persons so offending shall be tried, and if found guilty shall be punished in like manner as if the injury had been done to a white man. And it is agreed, that the Chiefs of said Ottoe and Missouri tribe shall, to the utmost of their power, exert themselves to recover horses or other property, which may be stolen or taken from any citizen or citizens of the United States, by any individual or individuals of said tribe; and the property so recovered shall be forthwith delivered to the agents or other person authorized to receive it, that it may be restored to the proper owner. And the United States hereby guarranty to any Indian or Indians of said tribe, a full indemnification for any horses or other property which may be stolen from them by any of their citizens: Provided, That the property stolen cannot be recovered, and that sufficient proof is produced that it was

actually stolen by a citizen of the United States. And the said Ottoe and Missouri tribe engage, on the requisition or demand of the President of the United States, or of the agents, to deliver up any white man resident among them.

ARTICLE 6.

And the Chiefs and Warriors, as aforesaid, promise and engage, that their tribe will never, by sale, exchange, or as presents, supply any nation, tribe, or band of Indians, not in amity with the United States, with guns, ammunition, or other implements of war.

Done at Fort Atkinson, Council Bluffs, this 26th day of September, A. D. one thousand eight hundred and twenty-five, and of the Independence of the United States the fiftieth.

In testimony whereof, the said Commissioners, Henry Atkinson and
Benjamin O'Fallon, and the Chiefs, Head-men, and Warriors, of
the Ottoe and Missouri tribe, have hereunto set their hands, and
affixed their seals.

H. ATKINSON, Br. Gen. U. S. Army.
BENJ. O'FALLON, U. S. Agt. Ind. Aff.

Ish-na-wong-ge-ge-he-the only chief,
Meh-ah-hun-jah—the big female,
Shunk-co-pe,

Sho-mon-e-ka-sa-the prairie wolf,
Wong-ge-ge-he-the chief,

Waw-zob-e-ing-ge-the little black bear,
Eho-che-nung-a-the mad man,
E-ke-shaw-mon-ne-the walking bear,
Waw-ne-sung-e-the one who bears down,

Waw-ro-ne-sa-the bullet,
Wa-do-ke-ga,
Waw-paw-si-ae,

Taw-ing-ee-the little deer,
Gray-tan-in-ca-the sparrow hawk,
Raw-no-way-braw-the broken pipe,
Non-jah-ning-e-the no heart,
Monto-ing-ge-the little white bear,
Mosk-ca-gaw-ha.

In presence of A. L. Langham, Sec. to the Com. A. R. Woolley, Lieut. Col. U. S. A. B. Riley, Capt. 6th Inf. J. Gantt, Capt. 6th Inf. John Gale, Surgeon U. S. Army Wm. N. Wickliffe, Lieut. U. S. A. G. W. Folger. Lieut. 6th U. S. Inf. J. Rodgers, Lieut. 6th Inf. L. M. Nute, Lieut. 6th Inf. M. W. Batman, Lieut. 6th. Inf. A. Richardson, Lieut. 6th Inf. J. Nichols, Lieut. 6th Inf. G. H. Crosman, Lieut. 6th Inf. G. H. Kennerly, U. S. S. Ind. Agt. W. W. Eaton, Lieut. 6th Inf. Michael Burdeau, Maha Interp. William Rodgers.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

No arms to be furnished by In

dians to persons not in amity with U. S.

TREATY WITH THE PAWNEE TRIBE.

For the purpose of perpetuating the friendship which has heretofore existed, as also to remove all future cause of discussion or dissension, as it respects trade and friendship between the United States and their citizens, and the Pawnee tribe of Indians, the President of the United States of America, by Brigadier General Henry Atkinson, of the United States' army, and Major Benjamin O'Fallon, Indian Agent, with full powers and authority, specially appointed and commissioned for that purpose, of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs, head men and Warriors of said Pawnee tribe of Indians, on behalf of their tribe of the other part, have made and entered into the following Articles and Conditions; which, when ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall be binding on both parties-to wit:

Sept. 30, 1825. Proclamation, Feb. 6, 1826.

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