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Oct. 23, 1826. Proclamation, Jan. 24, 1827.

Lands ceded to the U. S.

Reservations for the use of said tribe.

ARTICLES OF A TREATY

Made and concluded, near the mouth of the Mississinewa, upon the Wabash, in the State of Indiana, this twenty-third day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-six, between Lewis Cass, James B. Ray, and John Tipton, Commissioners on the part of the United States, and the Chiefs and Warriors of the Miami Tribe of Indians.

ARTICLE 1.

THE Miami Tribe of Indians cede to the United States all their claim to land in the State of Indiana, north and west of the Wabash and Miami rivers, and of the cession made by the said tribe to the United States, by the treaty concluded at St. Mary's October 6, 1818.

ARTICLE 2.

From the cession aforesaid, the following reservations, for the use of the said tribe, shall be made:

Fourteen sections of Land at Seek's village;

Five sections for the Beaver, below and adjoining the preceding reservation;

Thirty-six sections at Flat Belly's Village;

Five sections for Little Charley, above the old village, on the North side of Eel river;

One section for Laventure's daughter, opposite the Islands, about fifteen miles below Fort Wayne;

One section for Chapine, above, and adjoining Seek's village;
Ten sections at the White Raccoon's village;

Ten sections at the mouth of Mud Creek, on Eel river, at the old village;

Ten sections at the forks of the Wabash;

One reservation commencing two miles and a half below the mouth of the Mississinewa, and running up the Wabash five miles, with the bank thereof, and from these points running due north to Eel river.

Canal or road And it is agreed, that the State of Indiana may lay out a canal or a through the re- road through any of these reservations, and for the use of a canal, six chains along the same are hereby appropriated.

servations.

Land granted, not to be conveyed without

the consent of the President.

Payment in goods.

ARTICLE 3.

There shall be granted to each of the persons named in the schedule hereunto annexed, and to their heirs, the tracts of land therein designated; but the land so granted shall never be conveyed without the consent of the President of the United States.

ARTICLE 4.

The Commissioners of the United States have caused to be delivered to the Miami tribe goods to the value of $31,040 53, in part consideration for the cession herein made; and it is agreed, that if this treaty shall be ratified by the President and Senate of the United States, the. United States shall pay to the persons, named in the schedule this day signed by the Commissioners, and transmitted to the War Department, the sums affixed to their names respectively, for goods furnished by them, and amounting to the sum of $31,040 53. And it is further

agreed, that payment for these goods shall be made by the Miami tribe out of their annuity, if this treaty be not ratified by the United States. And the United States further engage to deliver to the said tribe, in the course of the next summer, the additional sum of $26,259 47 in goods.

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And it is also agreed, that an annuity of thirty-five thousand dollars, Annuity. ten thousand of which shall be in goods, shall be paid to the said tribe in the year one thousand eight hundred and twenty-seven, and thirty thousand dollars, five thousand of which shall be in goods, in the year one thousand eight hundred and twenty-eight; after which time, a permanent annuity of twenty-five thousand dollars shall be paid to them, as long as they exist together as a tribe; which several sums are to include the annuities due by preceding treaties to the said tribe.

And the United States further engage to furnish a wagon and one yoke of oxen for each of the following persons: namely, Joseph Richardville, Black Raccoon, Flat Belly, White Raccoon, Francois Godfroy, Little Beaver, Mettosanea, Seek, and Little Huron; and one wagon and a yoke of oxen for the band living at the forks of the Wabash.

And also to cause to be built a house, not exceeding the value of six hundred dollars for each of the following persons: namely, Joseph Richardville, Francois Godfroy, Louison Godfroy, Francis Lafontaine, White Raccoon, La Gros, Jean B. Richardville, Flat Belly, and Wau

we-as-see.

And also to furnish the said tribe with two hundred head of cattle, from four to six years old, and two hundred head of hogs; and to cause to be annually delivered to them, two thousand pounds of iron, one thousand pounds of steel, and one thousand pounds of tobacco.

And to provide five labourers to work three months in the year, for the small villages, and three labourers to work three months in the for the Mississinewa band.

ARTICLE 5.

year,

The Miami tribe being anxious to pay certain claims existing against them, it is agreed, as a part of the consideration for the cession in the first article, that these claims amounting to $7,727 47, and which are stated in a schedule this day signed by the Commissioners, and transmitted to the War Department, shall be paid by the United States.

ARTICLE 6.

The United States agree to appropriate the sum of two thousand dollars annually, as long as Congress may think proper, for the support of poor infirm persons of the Miami tribe, and for the education of the youth of the said tribe; which sum shall be expended under the direction of the President of the United States.

ARTICLE 7.

It is agreed, that the United States shall purchase of the persons, named in the schedule hereunto annexed, the land therein mentioned, which was granted to them by the Treaty of St. Mary's, and shall pay the price affixed to their names respectively; the payments to be made when the title to the lands is conveyed to the United States.

ARTICLE 8.

The Miami tribe shall enjoy the right of hunting upon the land herein conveyed, so long as the same shall be the property of the United

States.

ARTICLE 9.

A wagon, &c.

to be furnished certain persons.

A house for

certain persons.

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This treaty, after the same shall be ratified by the President and Senate, Treaty binding shall be binding upon the United States.

when ratified.

In testimony whereof, the said Lewis Cass, James B. Ray, and John Tipton, Commissioners as aforesaid, and the Chiefs and Warriors of the said Miami tribe, have hereunto set their hands, at the Wabash, on the twenty-third day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-six, and of the Independence of the United States the fifty-first.

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Done in presence of William Marshall, Sec'y to the Commission. J. M. Ray, Assist. Sec'y to Commission. Ben. V. Kercheval, Sub Agent. Wm. Conner, Interpreter. Joseph Barron. C. W. Ewing. J. B. Boure, Interpreter. James Foster. John Ewing, Senator, State of Indiana. James Gregory, Senator, State of Ind. Martin M. Ray, Representative, Ind. Sam. Hanna, Representative, Ind. George Hunt. O. L. Clark.

To the Indian names are subjoined marks.

Schedule of grants referred to in the foregoing Treaty, Article 3d.

To John B. Richardville, one section of land, between the mouth of Pipe Creek and the mouth of Eel River, on the north side of the Wabash, and one section on the north-west side of the St. Joseph, adjoining the old boundary line; also, one half section on the east side of the St. Joseph's, below Cha-po-tee's village.

To John B. Boure, one section on the north side of the St. Joseph, including Chop-patees village.

To the wife and children of Charley, a Miami chief, one section where they live.

To Ann Hackley and Jack Hackley, one section each, between the Maumee and the St. Joseph's rivers.

To the children of Maria Christiana De Rome, a half blood Miami, one section between the Maumee and the St. Joseph's.

To Ann Turner, alias Hackley, Rebecca Hackley, and Jane S. Wells, each one half section of land, to be located under the direction of the President of the United States.

To John B. Richardville, one section of land upon the north side of the Wabash, to include a large spring nearly opposite the mouth of Pipe Creek.

To Francois Godfroy, one section above and adjoining said last grant to J. B. Richardville.

To Louison Godfroy, one section above and adjoining the grant to Francois Godfroy.

To Francis Lafontaine, one section above and adjoining the grant to Louison Godfroy.

To John B. Richardville, junior, one section on the Wabash, below, and adjoining the reservation running from the Wabash to Eel River. To Joseph Richardville, one section above and adjoining the reservation running from the Wabash to Eel River.

To La Gros, three sections, where he now lives, and one section adjoining the Cranberry in the Portage Prairie.

A quarter section of land to each of the following persons, namely: Charles Gouin, Purri Gouin, and Therese Gouin, to be located under the direction of the President of the United States.

Two sections of land at the old town on Eel River, to be reserved for the use of the Metchinequea.

LEWIS CASS,

J. BROWN RAY,
JOHN TIPTON.

ARTICLES OF A TREATY

Made and concluded at the Butte des Morts, on Fox river, in the Territory of Michigan, between Lewis Cass and Thomas L. McKenney, Commissioners on the part of the United States, and the Chippewa, Menomonie, and Winebago tribes of Indians.

ARTICLE 1. Whereas, the southern boundary of the Chippewa country, from the Plover Portage of the Ouisconsin easterly, was left undefined by the treaty concluded at Prairie du Chien, August 19, 1825, in consequence of the non-attendance of some of the principal Menomonie chiefs; and, whereas it was provided by the said treaty, that, whenever the President of the United States might think proper, such of the tribes, parties to the said treaty, as might be interested in any particular line, should be convened, in order to agree upon its establishment;

Therefore, in pursuance of the said provision, it is agreed between the Chippewas, Menomonies and Winebagoes, that the southern boundary of the Chippeway country shall run as follows, namely: From the Plover Portage of the Ouisconsin, on a northeasterly course, to a point on Wolf river, equidistant from the Ashawano and Post lakes of said river, thence to the falls of the Pashaytig river of Green Bay; thence to the junction of the Neesau Kootag or Burnt-wood river, with the Menomonie; thence to the big island of the Shoskinaubic or Smooth rock river; thence following the channel of the said river to Green Bay, which it strikes between the little and the great Bay de Noquet.

ART. 2. Much difficulty having arisen from the negociations between the Menomonie and Winebago tribes and the various tribes and portions of tribes of Indians of the State of New York, and the claims of the respective parties being much contested, as well with relation to the tenure and boundaries of the two tracts, claimed by the said New York Indians, west of Lake Michigan, as to the authority of the persons who

Aug. 11, 1827.
Proclamation,

Feb. 23, 1829.

Chippewa southern boun. dary left undefined by treaty of 1825.

Ante, p. 272.

Southern boundary settled.

Territorial difficulties between certain to the President of the U. S.

tribes referred

Indian recognition of U. Š. title to a certain

tract of land.

Boundaries thereof.

Proviso.

Proviso.

Distribution of goods among the Indians.

Annual appro

cation of Indians.

signed the agreement on the part of the Menomonies, and the whole subject having been fully examined at the Council this day concluded, and the allegations, proofs, and statements, of the respective parties having been entered upon the Journal of the Commissioners, so that the same can be decided by the President of the United States; it is agreed by the Menomonies and Winebagoes, that so far as respects their interest in the premises, the whole matter shall be referred to the President of the United States, whose decision shall be final. And the President is authorized, on their parts, to establish such boundaries between them and the New York Indians as he may consider equitable and just.

ART. 3. It being important to the settlement of Green Bay that definite boundaries should be established between the tract claimed by the former French and British governments, and the lands of the Indians, as well to avoid future disputes as to settle the question of jurisdiction-It is therefore agreed between the Menomonie tribe and the United States, that the boundaries of the said tracts, the jurisdiction and title of which are hereby acknowledged to be in the United States, shall be as follows, namely:-Beginning on the shore of Green Bay, six miles due north from the parallel of the mouth of Fox river, and running thence in a straight line, but with the general course of the said river, and six miles therefrom to the intersection of the continuation of the westerly boundary of the tract at the Grand Kaukaulin, claimed by Augustin Grignion; thence on a line with the said boundary to the same; thence with the same to Fox river; thence on the same course, six miles; thence in a direct line to the southwestern boundary of the tract, marked on the plan of the claims at Green Bay, as the settlement at the bottom of the Bay; thence with the southerly boundary of the said tract to the southeasterly corner thereof; and thence with the easterly boundary of the said tract to Green Bay. Provided, that if the President of the United States should be of opinion that the boundaries thus established interfere with any just claims of the New York Indians, the President may then change the said boundaries in any manner he may think proper, so that the quantity of land contained in the said tract be not greater than by the boundaries herein defined. And provided also, that nothing herein contained shall be construed to have any effect upon the land claims at Green Bay; but the same shall remain as though this treaty had not been formed.

ART. 4. In consideration of the liberal establishment of the boundaries as herein provided for, the Commissioners of the United States have this day caused to be distributed among the Indians, goods to the amount of fifteen thousand six hundred and eighty-two dollars, payment for which shall be made by the United States.

ART. 5. The sum of one thousand dollars shall be annually appropriation for edu- priated for the term of three years; and the sum of fifteen hundred dollars shall be annually thereafter appropriated as long as Congress think proper, for the education of the children of the tribes, parties hereto, and of the New York Indians, to be expended under the direction of the President of the United States.

Right of U. S. to punish certain Winnebagoes.

Treaty to be obligatory when ratified.

ART. 6. The United States shall be at liberty, notwithstanding the Winebagoes are parties to this treaty, to pursue such measures as they may think proper for the punishment of the perpetrators of the recent outrages at Prairie du Chien, and upon the Mississippi, and for the prevention of such acts hereafter.

ART. 7. This treaty shall be obligatory after its ratification by the President and Senate of the United States.

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