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for those countries demonstrating a genuine commitment to democracy and human rights. SEC. 1232. ANNUAL LISTING OF POSSIBLE EXCESS DEFENSE ARTICLES.

Section 25(a) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2765(a)) is amended

(1) by striking “and” at the end of paragraph (12)(B);

(2) by redesignating paragraph (13) as paragraph (14); and

(3) by inserting after paragraph (12) the following:

"(13) a list of weapons systems that are significant military equipment (as defined in section 47(9) of this Act), and numbers thereof, that are believed likely to become available for transfer

as excess defense articles during the next 12 months; and”. SEC. 1233. LEASES OF DEFENSE ARTICLES FOR FOREIGN COUNTRIES

AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS. Section 61(b) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2796(b)), is amended,

(1) by striking “(b) Each lease agreement” and inserting "(b)(1) Each lease agreement";

(2) by striking of not to exceed five years” and inserting "which may not exceed (A) five years, and (B) a specified period of time required to complete major refurbishment work of the leased articles to be performed prior to the delivery of the leased articles,"; and

(3) by adding at the end the following: "(2) In this subsection, the term 'major refurbishment work? means work for which the period of performance is 6 months or more.”. SEC. 1234. PRIORITY WITH RESPECT TO TRANSFER OF EXCESS

DEFENSE ARTICLES. Section 516(c)(2) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321j(c)2)) is amended by striking "and to major non-NATO allies on such southern and southeastern flank" and inserting “, to major non-NATO allies on such southern and southeastern flank, and to the Philippines”.

Subtitle E-Other Political-Military

Assistance

SEC. 1241. DESTRUCTION OF SURPLUS WEAPONS STOCKPILES.

Of the funds authorized to be appropriated to the President for fiscal year 2003 to carry out chapters 1 and 10 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151 et seq.), relating to development assistance, up to $10,000,000 is authorized to be made available for the destruction of surplus stockpiles of small arms, light weapons, and other munitions.

Subtitle F-Antiterrorism Assistance

SEC. 1251. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

Section 574(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2349aa-4(a)) is amended by striking "and $73,000,000 for fiscal year 2002” and inserting “, $73,000,000 for fiscal year 2002, and $64,200,000 for fiscal year 2003”.

Subtitle G-Other Matters

SEC. 1261. ADDITIONS TO UNITED STATES WAR RESERVE STOCKPILES

FOR ALLIES.
Section 514(b)(2) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22
U.S.C. 2321h(b)(2)) is amended to read as follows:

“(2)(A) The value of such additions to stockpiles of defense articles in foreign countries shall not exceed $100,000,000 for fiscal year 2003

"(B) Of the amount specified in subparagraph (A) for fiscal year 2003, not more than $100,000,000 may be made available for stockpiles in the State of Israel.”. SEC. 1262. REVISED MILITARY ASSISTANCE REPORTING REQUIRE

MENTS. (a) EXCEPTION FOR CERTAIN COUNTRIES.-Section 656(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2416(a) is amended

(1) by striking "(a) ANNUAL REPORT.-Not” and inserting
the following:
“(a) ANNUAL REPORT.-

“(1) IN GENERAL.-Not”; and
(2) by adding at the end the following:

"(2) EXCEPTION FOR CERTAIN COUNTRIES.- Paragraph (1) does not apply to any NATO member, Australia, Japan, or New Zealand, unless one of the appropriate congressional committees has specifically requested, in writing, inclusion of such country in the report. Such request shall be made not later than 90 calendar days prior to the date on which the report is required to be transmitted.".

(b) ANNUAL MILITARY ASSISTANCE REPORTS.-Section 655 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2415) is amended

(1) by striking subsection (c); and

(2) by redesignating subsection (d) as subsection (c). (c) QUARTERLY REPORTS ON GOVERNMENT-TO-GOVERNMENT ARMS EXPORTS.-Section 36(a) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2776(a)) is amended

(1) by striking paragraph (7); and

(2) by redesignating paragraphs (8), (9), (10), (11), (12), and (13) as paragraphs (7), (8), (9), (10), (11), and (12), respec

tively. SEC. 1263. CONSULTATION WITH CONGRESS WITH REGARD TO TAIWAN.

Beginning 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, and every 180 days thereafter, the President shall provide detailed briefings to and consult with the appropriate congressional committees regarding the United States security assistance to Taiwan, including the provision of defense articles and defense services.

Deadline.

Effective date.
President.
22 USC 3302
note.

TITLE XIII–NONPROLIFERATION AND

EXPORT CONTROL ASSISTANCE

Subtitle A-General Provisions

SEC. 1301. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

(a) AUTHORIZATION.-Section 585 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2349bb-4) is amended

(1) in subsection (a), by striking all after “chapter" and inserting "$ 162,000,000 for fiscal year 2003."; and (2) in subsection (c)—

(A) in the subsection heading by striking "FISCAL YEAR 2001”; and

(B) by striking “2001” and inserting “2002”. (b) SUBALLOCATIONS.—Of the amount authorized to be appropriated to the President for fiscal year 2003 by section 585 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2349bb-4

(1) $2,000,000 is authorized to be available for such fiscal year for the

purpose of carrying out section 584 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as added by section 1303 of this Act; and

(2) $65,000,000 for fiscal year 2003 are authorized to be available for science and technology centers in the independent states of the former Soviet Union.

(c) CONFORMING AMENDMENT.-Section 302 of the Security Assistance Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–280; 114 Stat. 853) is repealed.

(d) FURTHER AUTHORIZATION.—There is authorized to be appropriated under "Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining, and Related Programs” $382,400,000 for fiscal year 2003. SEC. 1302. NONPROLIFERATION TECHNOLOGY ACQUISITION PRO

GRAMS FOR FRIENDLY FOREIGN COUNTRIES. (a) IN GENERAL.–For the purpose of enhancing the nonproliferation and export control capabilities of friendly countries, of the amount authorized to be appropriated for fiscal year 2003 by section 585 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2349bb et seq.), the Secretary is authorized to make available

(1) $5,000,000 for the procurement and provision of nuclear, chemical, and biological detection systems, including spectroscopic and pulse echo technologies; and

(2) $10,000,000 for the procurement and provision of xray systems capable of imaging sea-cargo containers. (b) REPORTS ON TRAINING PROGRAM.

(1) INITIAL REPORT.-Not later than March 31, 2003, the Secretary shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees setting forth his plans and budget for a multiyear training program to train foreign personnel in the utilization of the systems described in subsection (a).

(2) SUBSEQUENT REPORTS.—Not later than March 31, 2004, and annually thereafter for the next three years, the Secretary shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees describing the progress, current status, and budget of that training program and of the provision of those systems.

22 USC 2349bb note.

Deadlines.

22 USC 2349bb-3, 2349bb-4.

22 USC
2349bb-2a note.

SEC. 1303. INTERNATIONAL NONPROLIFERATION AND EXPORT CON

TROL TRAINING. Chapter 9 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2349bb et seq.) is amended

(1) by redesignating sections 584 and 585 as sections 585 and 586, respectively; and

(2) by inserting after section 583 the following: “SEC. 584. INTERNATIONAL NONPROLIFERATION EXPORT CONTROL

TRAINING. "(a) GENERAL AUTHORITY.The President is authorized to furnish, on such terms and conditions consistent with this chapter (but whenever feasible on a reimbursable basis), education and training to appropriate military and civilian personnel of foreign countries for the purpose of enhancing the nonproliferation and export control capabilities of such personnel through their attendance in special courses of instruction conducted by the United States.

"(b) ADMINISTRATION OF COURSES.- The Secretary of State shall have overall responsibility for the development and conduct of international nonproliferation education and training programs under this section, and may utilize other departments and agencies of the United States, as appropriate, to recommend personnel for the education and training and to administer specific courses of instruction.

"(c) PURPOSES.--Education and training activities conducted under this section shall be

“(1) of a technical nature, emphasizing techniques for detecting, deterring, monitoring, interdicting, and countering proliferation;

“(2) designed to encourage effective and mutually beneficial relations and increased understanding between the United States and friendly countries; and

"(3) designed to improve the ability of friendly countries to utilize their resources with maximum effectiveness, thereby contributing to greater self-reliance by such countries.

"(d) PRIORITY TO CERTAIN COUNTRIES.-In selecting personnel for education and training pursuant to this section, priority should be given to personnel from countries determined by the Secretary of State to be countries frequently transited by proliferation-related shipments of cargo.”. SEC. 1304. RELOCATION OF SCIENTISTS.

(a) REINSTATEMENT OF CLASSIFICATION AUTHORITY.—Section 4 of the Soviet Scientists Immigration Act of 1992 (Public Law 102– 509; 106 Stat. 3316; 8 U.S.C. 1153 note) is amended by striking subsection (d) and inserting the following:

“d) DURATION OF AUTHORITY.—The authority under subsection (a) shall be in effect during the following periods:

“(1) The period beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act and ending 4 years after such date.

“(2) The period beginning on the date of the enactment of the Security Assistance Act of 2002 and ending 4 years after such date.”.

(b) LIMITATION ON NUMBER OF SCIENTISTS ELIGIBLE FOR VISAS UNDER AUTHORITY.—Section 4(c) of such Act (8 U.S.C. 1153 note) is amended by striking "750" and inserting "950”.

(c) LIMITATION ON ELIGIBILITY.-Section 4(a) of that Act (8 U.S.C. 1153 note) is amended by adding at the end the following new sentence: "A scientist is not eligible for designation under this subsection if the scientist has previously been granted the status of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence (as defined in section 101(a)(20) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(20).”.

(d) CONSULTATION REQUIREMENT.—The Attorney General shall 8 USC 1153 note. consult with the Secretary, the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of Energy, and the heads of other appropriate agencies of the United States regarding

(1) previous experience in implementing the Soviet Scientists Immigration Act of 1992; and

(2) any changes that those officials would recommend in the regulations prescribed under that Act. SEC. 1305. INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY REGULAR

BUDGET ASSESSMENTS AND VOLUNTARY CONTRIBU

TIONS. (a) FINDINGS.-Congress makes the following findings:

(1) The Department has concluded that the International Atomic Energy Agency (in this section referred to as the "IAEA”) is a critical and effective instrument for verifying compliance with international nuclear nonproliferation agreements, and that it serves as an essential barrier to the spread of nuclear weapons.

(2) The IAEA furthers United States national security objectives by helping to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons material, especially through its work on effective verification and safeguards measures.

(3) The IAEA can also perform a critical role in monitoring and verifying aspects of nuclear weapons reduction agreements between nuclear weapons states.

(4) The IAEA has adopted a multifaceted action plan, to be funded by voluntary contributions, to address the threats posed by radioactive sources that could be used in a radiological weapon and will be the leading international agency in this effort.

(5) As the IAEA has negotiated and developed more effective verification and safeguards measures, it has experienced significant real growth in its mission, especially in the vital area of nuclear safeguards inspections.

(6) Nearly two decades of zero budget growth have affected the ability of the IAEA to carry out its mission and to hire and retain the most qualified inspectors and managers, as evidenced in the decreasing proportion of such personnel who hold doctorate degrees.

(7) Increased voluntary contributions by the United States will be needed if the IAEA is to increase its safeguards activities and also to implement its action plan to address the worldwide risks posed by lost or poorly secured radioactive sources.

(8) Although voluntary contributions by the United States lessen the IAEA's budgetary constraints, they cannot readily be used for the long-term capital investments or permanent staff increases necessary to an effective IAEA safeguards regime.

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