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on International Relations of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate.

(2) CLASSIFIED NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION.—The term “classified national security information” means information that is classified or classifiable under Executive Order 12958 or a successor Executive order.

(3) COVERED ALLIED PERSONS.—The term "covered allied persons” means military personnel, elected or appointed officials, and other persons employed by or working on behalf of the government of a NATO member country, a major nonNATO ally (including Australia, Egypt, Israel, Japan, Jordan, Argentina, the Republic of Korea, and New Zealand), or Taiwan, for so long as that government is not a party to the International Criminal Court and wishes its officials and other persons working on its behalf to be exempted from the jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court.

(4) COVERED UNITED STATES PERSONS.—The term “covered United States persons” means members of the Armed Forces of the United States, elected or appointed officials of the United States Government, and other persons employed by or working on behalf of the United States Government, for so long as the United States is not a party to the International Criminal Court.

(5) EXTRADITION.-The terms "extradition" and "extradite” mean the extradition of a person in accordance with the provisions of chapter 209 of title 18, United States Code, (including section 3181(b) of such title) and such terms include both extradition and surrender as those terms are defined in Article 102 of the Rome Statute.

(6) INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT.—The term “International Criminal Court” means the court established by the Rome Statute.

(7) MAJOR NON-NATO ALLY.—The term “major non-NATO ally” means a country that has been so designated in accordance with section 517 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.

(8) PARTICIPATE IN ANY PEACEKEEPING OPERATION UNDER CHAPTER VI OF THE CHARTER OF THE UNITED NATIONS OR PEACE ENFORCEMENT OPERATION UNDER CHAPTER VII OF THE CHARTER OF THE UNITED NATIONS.—The term "participate in any peacekeeping operation under chapter VI of the charter of the United Nations or peace enforcement operation under chapter VII of the charter of the United Nations” means to assign members of the Armed Forces of the United States to a United Nations military command structure as part of a peacekeeping operation under chapter VI of the charter of the United Nations or peace enforcement operation under chapter VII of the charter of the United Nations in which those members of the Armed Forces of the United States are subject to the command or operational control of one or more foreign military officers not appointed in conformity with article II, section 2, clause 2 of the Constitution of the United States.

(9) PARTY TO THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT.-The term “party to the International Criminal Court” means a government that has deposited an instrument of ratification, acceptance, approval, or accession to the Rome Statute, and has not withdrawn from the Rome Statute pursuant to Article 127 thereof.

(10) PEACEKEEPING OPERATION UNDER CHAPTER VI OF THE CHARTER OF THE UNITED NATIONS OR PEACE ENFORCEMENT OPERATION UNDER CHAPTER VII OF THE CHARTER OF THE UNITED NATIONS.—The term "peacekeeping operation under chapter VI of the charter of the United Nations or peace enforcement operation under chapter VII of the charter of the United Nations” means any military operation to maintain or restore international peace and security that

(A) is authorized by the United Nations Security Council under chapter VI or VII of the charter of the United Nations; and

(B) is paid for from assessed contributions of United Nations members that are made available for peacekeeping or peace enforcement activities.

(11) ROME STATUTE.—The term “Rome Statute” means the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, adopted by the United Nations Diplomatic Conference of Plenipotentiaries on the Establishment of an International Criminal Court on July 17, 1998.

(12) SUPPORT.—The term “support” means assistance of any kind, including financial support, transfer of property or other material support, services, intelligence sharing, law enforcement cooperation, the training or detail of personnel, and the arrest or detention of individuals.

(13) UNITED STATES MILITARY ASSISTANCE.—The term "United States military assistance" means

(A) assistance provided under chapter 2 or 5 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151 et seq.); or

(B) defense articles or defense services furnished with the financial assistance of the United States Government, including through loans and guarantees, under section 23

of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2763). SEC. 2014. REPEAL OF LIMITATION.

The Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2002 (division A of Public Law 107–117) is amended by striking section 8173. 115 Stat. 2289. SEC. 2015. ASSISTANCE TO INTERNATIONAL EFFORTS.

22 USC 7433. Nothing in this title shall prohibit the United States from rendering assistance to international efforts to bring to justice Saddam Hussein, Slobodan Milosovic, Osama bin Laden, other members of Al Queda, leaders of Islamic Jihad, and other foreign nationals accused of genocide, war crimes or crimes against humanity.

TITLE III—OTHER MATTERS

SEC. 3001. AMENDMENTS TO THE CARIBBEAN BASIN ECONOMIC

RECOVERY ACT.
Section 213(b)(2)(A) of the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery
Act (title II of Public Law 98–67; 19 U.S.C. 2703(b)(2)(A)) is
amended-

(1) in clause (i), by adding at the end the following:

"Apparel articles shall qualify under the preceding sentence only if all dyeing, printing, and finishing of the fabrics from which the articles are assembled, if the fabrics are knit fabrics, is carried out in the United States. Apparel

19 USC 3203 note.

articles shall qualify under the first sentence of this clause only if all dyeing, printing, and finishing of the fabrics from which the articles are assembled, if the fabrics are woven fabrics, is carried out in the United States."; and (2) in clause (ii), by adding at the end the following:

"Apparel articles shall qualify under the preceding sentence only if all dyeing, printing, and finishing of the fabrics from which the articles are assembled, if the fabrics are knit fabrics, is carried out in the United States. Apparel articles shall qualify under the first sentence of this clause only if all dyeing, printing, and finishing of the fabrics from which the articles are assembled, if the fabrics are

woven fabrics, is carried out in the United States.”. (b) ANDEAN TRADE PREFERENCE ACT.-Any duty free or other preferential treatment provided under the Andean Trade Preference Act to apparel articles assembled from fabric formed in the United States shall apply to such articles only if all dyeing, printing, and finishing of the fabrics from which the articles are assembled if the fabrics are knit fabrics, is carried out in the United States. Any duty-free or other preferential treatment provided under the Andean Trade Preference Act to apparel articles assembled from fabric formed in the United States shall apply to such articles only if all dyeing, printing, and finishing of the fabrics from which the articles are assembled if the fabrics are woven fabrics, is carried out in the United States.

(c) EFFECTIVE DATE.-Subsection (b) and the amendments made by subsection (a) shall take effect

(1) 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act,

19 USC 2703 note.

or

Rural Service
Improvement Act
of 2002.
Alaska.
Postal service.
39 USC 101 note.
39 USC 5402
note.

(2) September 1, 2002,
whichever occurs first.
SEC. 3002. RURAL SERVICE IMPROVEMENT.

(a) SHORT TITLE.—This title may be cited as the "Rural Service
Improvement Act of 2002”.
(b) FINDINGS.-Congress makes the following findings:

(1) The State of Alaska is the largest State in the Union and has a very limited system of roads connecting communities.

(2) Alaska has more pilots per capita than any other State in the Union.

(3) Pilots flying in Alaska are often the most skilled and best-prepared pilots in the world.

(4) Air travel within the State of Alaska is often hampered by severe weather conditions and treacherous terrain.

(5) The United States Government owns nearly 23 of Alaska's landmass, including large tracts of land separating isolated communities within the State.

(6) Such Federal ownership has inhibited the ability of Alaskans to build roads connecting isolated communities.

(7) Most communities and a large portion of the population within the State can only be reached by air.

(8) The vast majority of food items and everyday necessities destined for these isolated communities and populations can only be transported through the air.

(9) The Intra-Alaska Bypass Mail system, created by Congress and operated by the United States Postal Service under section 5402 of title 39, United States Code, with input from the Department of Transportation, connecting hundreds of rural and isolated communities within the State, is a critical piece of the Alaska and the national transportation system. The system is like a 4-legged stool, designed to

(A) provide the most affordable means of delivering food and everyday necessities to these rural and isolated communities;

(B) establish a system whereby the Postal Service can meet its obligations to deliver mail to every house and business in the United States;

(C) support affordable and reliable passenger service; and

(D) support affordable and reliable nonmail freight service. (10) Without the Intra-Alaska Bypass Mail system,

(A) it would be difficult and more expensive for the Postal Service to meet its obligation of delivering mail to every house and business in the United States; and

(B) food, medicine, freight, and everyday necessities and passenger service for these rural and isolated communities would cost several times the current level.

(11) Attempts by Congress to support passenger and nonmail freight service in Alaska using the Intra-Alaska Bypass Mail system have yielded some positive results, but some carriers have been manipulating the system by carrying few, if any, passengers and little nonmail freight while earning most of their revenues from the carriage of nonpriority bypass mail.

(12) As long as the Federal Government continues to own large tracts of land within the State of Alaska which impede access to isolated communities, it is in the best interest of the Postal Service, the residents of Alaska and the United States

(A) to ensure that the Intra-Alaska Bypass Mail system remains strong, viable, and affordable for the Postal Service;

(B) to ensure that residents of rural and isolated communities in Alaska continue to have affordable, reliable, and safe passenger service;

(C) to ensure that residents of rural and isolated communities in Alaska continue to have affordable, reliable, and safe nonmail freight service;

(D) to encourage that intra-Alaska air carriers move toward safer, more secure, and more reliable air transportation under the Federal Aviation Administration's guidelines and in accordance with part 121 of title 14, Code of Federal Regulations, where such operations are supported by the needs of the community; and

(E) that Congress, pursuant to the authority granted under Article I, section 8 of the United States Constitution to establish Post Offices and post roads, make changes to ensure that the Intra-Alaska Bypass Mail system continues to be used to support substantial passenger and nonmail freight service and to reduce costs for the Postal

Service. (c) SELECTION OF CARRIERS OF NONPRIORITY BYPASS MAIL TO CERTAIN POINTS IN ALASKA.

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99-194 0 - 03-5: QL 3 Part 2

(1) DEFINITIONS.Section 5402 of title 39, United States Code, is amended

(A) by striking subsection (e);

(B) by redesignating subsections (a) through (d) as subsections (b) through (e), respectively; and

(C) by inserting before subsection (b), as redesignated, the following: “(a) In this section

"(1) the term 'acceptance point means the point at which nonpriority bypass mail originates;

(2) the terms ‘air carrier', 'interstate air transportation', and 'foreign air transportation' have the meanings given such terms in section 40102(a) of title 49, United States Code;

“(3) the term base fare' means the fare paid to the carrier issuing the passenger ticket or carrying nonmail freight which may entail service being provided by more than 1 carrier;

“(4) the term 'bush carrier' means a carrier operating aircraft certificated within the payload capacity requirements of subsection (g)(1)(D)(i) on a city pair route;

“(5) the term bush passenger carrier' means a passenger carrier that meets the requirements of subsection (g)(1)(D)(i) and provides passenger service on a city pair route;

“(6) the term bush route' means an air route in which only a bush carrier is tendered nonpriority bypass mail between the origination point, being either an acceptance point or a hub, as determined by the Postal Service, and the destination city;

"(7) the term 'city pair' means service between an origin and destination city pair; "(8) the term 'composite rate'

“(A) means a combination of mainline and bush rates paid to a bush carrier for a direct flight from an acceptance

a
point to a bush destination beyond a hub point; and

“(B) shall be based on the mainline rate paid to the hub, plus the lowest bush rate paid to bush carriers in the State of Alaska for the distance traveled from the hub point to the destination point;

"(9) the term 'equitable tender' means the practice of the Postal Service of equitably distributing mail on a fair and reasonable basis between those air carriers that offer equivalent services and costs between 2 communities in accordance with the regulations of the Postal Service;

“10) the term 'existing mainline carrier' means a mainline carrier (as defined in this subsection) that on January 1, 2001, was

"(A) certified under part 121;

“(B) qualified to provide mainline nonpriority bypass mail service, and

“(C) actually engaged in the carriage of mainline nonpriority bypass mail through scheduled service in the State of Alaska;

"(11) the term 'mainline carrier' means a carrier operating aircraft under part 121 and certificated within the payload capacity requirements of subsection (g)(1)(D)(ii) on a given city pair route;

“(12) the term ‘mainline route' means a city pair in which a mainline carrier is tendered nonpriority bypass mail;

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