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THE FAR EASTERN CRISIS

OCCUPATION OF MANCHURIA BY JAPAN, BEGINNING OF JAPANESE MILITARY

AGGRESSION, AND EFFORTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND OTHER POWERS TO PRESERVE PEACE_Continued

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From the Consul at Geneva (tel.)

Removal to Paris of the portion of the Secretariat staff con-
cerned with the Sino-Japanese question. Conversation with
Drummond, who sees Japanese position as unchanged in spite
of optimistic press reports.
To the Chargé in France (tel.)

For Dawes: Approval of Dawes' mention of Nine-Power
Treaty, as it represents traditional U. S. policy toward China;
opinion that this treaty renounces any claim by Japan to
"special rights” in Manchuria.
To the Minister in China (tel.)

Reminder that U. S. Government was not a party to the
note of July 15, 1902, and inquiry as to whether there are any
instances on record of American consular officials at Tientsin
having joined with others in in yoking the note.
From the Minister in China (tel.)

From Mukden: Minor clash on Nonni-Angangki front;
General Honjo's intention of opening railway through to
Tsitsihar and keeping it open.
To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)

Concurrence of War and State Departments in the sending
of Colonel McIlroy to Manchuria provided attachés of two
other leading powers are sent; instructions that the mission
should be considered nonpolitical.
From the Chargé in France (tel.)

From Dawes: Conversation with Briand, who brought up
the question of Dawes' sitting on the Council and the implica-
tions resulting from non-attendance. Dawes' suggestion that
after several meetings the United States might accept an
invitati to discuss matters involving American treaty rights
and cooperation in the Kellogg Pact. Request for Depart-
ment's comments on this suggestion.
From the Minister in China (tel.)

From Harbin: Information that General Ma has defied
Japanese ultimatum and that Chinese fear an attempt to
shatter his forces before November 16.
Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State of a Conversation

With the Japanese Ambassador
Information from the Japanese Ambassador that Matsu-
daira will be in Paris for conferences during the Council session;
that the position of the Wakatsuki Cabinet in Tokyo is very
dangerous; that unless General Ma's forces attack the Japanese
contingent at the Nonni River bridge, there is no danger of
further Japanese advance.
From the Minister in China (tel.)

From Harbin: Information from Secretary Chao of tele-
grams from General Ma (texts printed) stating Japanese
intentions of occupying Taoang Railway to main Tsitsihar
Station, and describing an encounter near Sanchienfang.

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THE FAR EASTERN CRISIS OCCUPATION OF MANCHURIA BY JAPAN, BEGINNING OF JAPANESE MILITARY

AGGRESSION, AND EFFORTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND OTHER POWERS TO PRESERVE PEACE—Continued

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Nov. 15 From the Chargé in France (tel.)
(741) From Dawes: Conversation with Sze concerning the possi-

bility of settling the questions of evacuation and of protection
of Japanese nationals without bringing up the Japanese fifth

point.
Nov. 15 From the Consul General at Tientsin (tel.)

Report that situation is not so good, as normal measures for

settlement of trouble are not being employed.
Nov, 15 From the Chargé in France (tel.)
(742) From Dawes: Conversation with Matsudaira, who ex-

pressed the fear that with the increasingly dangerous state of
Japanese public opinion, his Government might not favor his

recommendations to moderate the Japanese position.
Nov, 16 From the Minister in China (tel.)
(944) General report of the situation, with the observation that

there is no evidence of Japanese intentions to withdraw, and
that if the League can do nothing, the people will take matters

into their own hands.
Nov. 16 From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
(219) Report that judgment of foreign diplomats in Tokyo recom-

mends against further pressure on Japan at Geneva. Nov. 16 Memorandum of Trans-Atlantic Telephone Conversation

Between the Secretary and Dawes: Authorization by the
Secretary for Dawes to sit on future sessions of the Council, and
Dawes' opinion that it will not now be necessary; Dawes' in-
formation that speeches in the Council will be avoided until

Japanese domestic situation is settled.
Nov. 16 To the Chargé in France (tel.)
(551) For Dawes: Instructions to make no comment whatever in

case Japanese bring up protocols attached to the Sino-Japanese

treaty relating to Manchuria. Nov. 16 the Chargé in France (tel.)

was China and Japan, not the other powers, who chose the

neutral observers.
Nov. 16 From the Chargé in France (tel.)
(744) From Dawes: Drummond's indication that it is the general

feeling of the Council that disputants should agree on two com-
mittees, one to consider Japanese safety and evacuation of

Japanese troops, and the other the five points of Japan.
Nov. 16 From the Minister in China (tel.)
(946) From Harbin: Report by Captain Tenney that there were

no signs of Soviet activities near Manchouli and Hailar. Nov. 16 From the Minister in China (tel.)

Rumors in Nanking that the United States, by not sending an observer to the Paris meeting, is making a concession to Japan. Intimation by Wellington Koo that Chinese are prepared to start direct discussions under League auspices or with observers appointed by the League.

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05236 To be Sare reminder that in the Shantung negotiations it

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AGGRESSION, AND EFFORTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND OTHER POWERS TO PRESERVE PEACE_Continued

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From the Chargé in France (tel.)

From Dawes: Conversation with Simon, who submitted a
memorandum of personal and tentative suggestions to meet
Japan's demands concerning treaty rights and railways;
Dawes' reminder that China protested the 1915 treaties and
that the United States went on record against the recognition
of any treaties impairing open-door rights and the integrity
of China. Request for observations on the Simon memoran-
dum.
From the Chargé in France (tel.)

From Dawes: Receipt from Drummond of communication
from the Chinese (text printed) outlining situation at Nonni
Bridge and stating that Japanese intend to occupy Tsitsihar,
From the Minister in China (tel.)

From Harbin: Report that Japanese have been informed
that the withdrawal of Chinese troops from Tsitsihar as de-
manded in their ultimatum rests with the Heilungkiang Prov-
ince authorities.
To the Consul General at Nanking (tel.)

Information for the Minister that Department has brought
up the method of the Shantung negotiations several times,
but does not wish the suggestion to emanate from the United
States; that no sort of rapprochement has been created
between the United States and Japan.
From the Minister in China (tel.)

From Harbin: Report of General Ma's determination to
resist and of Japanese reverses at Nonni River.
To the Consul General at Nanking (tel.)

Advice for the Minister that the Department prefers not
to make any further statement regarding an investigation at
Tsitsihar, and is awaiting telegraphic report from Tientsin
before replying to Chiang Kai-shek's request for investiga-
tion there.
To the Chargé in France (tel.)

For Dawes: Information that Department did not make
certain commitments printed in the New York Herald-Tribune.
From the Chargé in France (tel.)

From Dawes: Information of private meeting of the Council
at which it was decided that Briand should approach the
Japanese on the precise importance of their fifth point and
which treaties they consider pertinent.
From the Chargé in France (tel.)

From Dawes: Résumé of conversations with Sze, Drum-
mond, and Matsudaira; memorandum of a 3-point proposal
presented by_Matsudaira (text printed). Opinion that the
role of Nine-Power Treaty in the settlement looms larger.
From the Chargé in France (tel.)

From Dawes: Receipt of résumé by Simon (text printed) of Manchurian situation as he sees it, suggesting that Japan might agree to withdraw upon China's agreement to adjust the railway trouble and to assure the League of protection to Japanese interests.

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THE FAR EASTERN CRISIS OCCUPATION OF MANCHURIA BY JAPAN, BEGINNING OF JAPANESE MILITARY

AGGRESSION, AND EFFORTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND OTHER POWERS TO PRESERVE Peace-Continued

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Nov. 17 To the Chargé in France (tel.)
(560) For Dawes: Advice that Department objects to Simon's sug-

gestion in that it yields to Japan permission to extort by force
a ratification of treaty rights, and that the United States is not

weakening in its position.
Nov. 18 From the Minister in China (tel.)
(953) Inquiry concerning Reuter report of New York Herald-

Tribune story on U. Š. attitude toward Japan.
Nov. 18 From the Minister in China (tel.)
(954) Mandate issued by National Government (text printed) de-

claring null and void all agreements pertaining to property
made with foreigners without the authorization of the Central

Government.
Nov. 18 From the Minister in China (tel.)
(955) Acceptance by National Government of General Wan Fu-lin's

resignation as Chairman of Heilungkiang, and appointment

of General Ma. Nov. 18 From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.) (222) Report that General Staff is considering dispatch of an addi

tional division to Manchuria, and that three more air squad

rons have been sent. Nov. 18 From the Minister in China (tel.) (956) Japanese attack on General Ma's forces with six bombing

planes. Nov, 18 To the Chargé in France (tel.) (565) For Dawes: Opinion that if China and Japan could agree as

to what treaties are valid, Simon's suggestion would be helpful. Nov. 18 From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)

(223) Tense situation in Tokyo and possibility of a Cabinet change. Nov. 18 From the Minister in China (tel.)

(959) From Mukden: Report of Japanese offensive on Nonni front.
Nov. 18 To the Minister in China (tel.)
(425) Advice that the Consulate General at Mukden should not

undertake to furnish Japanese with information concerning the
operation of the radio station, but that if Radio Corporation
considers it desirable to furnish such information to the Japa-
nese, it should first contact the organization with which it con-

cluded the traffic agreement.
Nov. 18 From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)
(224) Information from the Foreign Minister that General Ma was

understood to have agreed to Japanese proposal that he with-
draw so as not to impede railroad operation, but that he had
attacked instead. Foreign Minister's denial that Japanese ex-

pect to make Pu-yi emperor of Manchuria. Nov. 18 Memorandum by the Under Secretary of State

Under Secretary's denial, upon inquiry by British Am. bassador, of press reports that United States had assured Japan that it would not take part in League sanctions against

Japan. 587122-46-VOL, III

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THE FAR EASTERN CRISIS OccupatiON OF MANCHURIA BY JAPAN, BEGINNING OF JAPANESE MILITARY

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To the Chargé in France (tel.)

For Dawes: Opinion that Matsudaira's proposal should be
rejected, and reasons therefor; fear that the only hope for
settlement is to make public the whole case against Japan.
From the Chargé in France (tel.)

From Dawes: Report that he has made clear to the Jap-
anese the position of the United States, that Japanese delega-
tion have not heard from Tokyo on their 3-point proposal but
are now asking for authority to withdraw point 1 and to sub-
mit only point 2 to the League. Matsudaira's statement
concerning alarming internal situation in Japan.
To the Chargé in France (tel.)

For Dawes: Transmittal of statement to the press (text
printed) denying current press reports and declaring U. S.
position as unchanged.
From the Chargé in France (tel.)

From Dawes: Report of presentation at private Council
meeting of informal suggestions made by Yoshizawa.
From the Chargé in France (tel.)

From Dawes: Private Council meeting at which Yoshizawa
was questioned at length, and his assertions that Japan must
have an agreement before withdrawal, and a new treaty re-
affirming old treaties.
From the Chargé in France (tel.)

From Dawes: Simon's inquiry whether the United States
would participate in a commission sent under article 15 of the
League Covenant to report on the situation.
Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs

of a Conversation Between the Secretary of State and the

Chinese Chargé
Inquiry by Dr. Yen concerning the attitude of the United
States toward the invoking of the Nine-Power Treaty, and
Secretary's reply that at the moment U. S. attention should
be concentrated on the efforts at Paris.
From the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs at Nanking to the

Chinese Legation
Japanese offensive against General Ma's troops and Japanese
determination to seize Tsitsihar.
From the Minister in China (tel.)

Receipt of manifesto from Ministry of Foreign Affairs (text
printed) reiterating China's intention not to recognize any
institutions established under Japanese occupation.
From the Minister in China (tel.)

From Harbin: Report of attack on General Ma at Tsitsihar;
information that Kirin Government has been set up at
Pinhsien, subordinate to Central Government.

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