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Counties.
Schley..
Scriven...
Spalding
Stewart
Sumter..
Talbot....
Taliafei ro...
Tattnal....
Taylor
Terrell
Tulfair..
Thomas..
Towns
Troup.
Twiggs
Unjon
Upson
Walker..
Walton...
Ware
Warren
Warbirgton.
Wayne
Webster.
White.
Wilcox
Wilkes
Wilkinson.
Whitfield
Worth...

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Whites.

2,209 3,563 5,214 6,857 6,141 5,280 1,841 2,324 3,473 3,062 1,873 5,072 2,93 6,935 2,750 3,955 5,133 9,333 6,355 1,749 4,229 6,506 1,635 2,534 2,831 1,532 3,362 5,340 8,047 1,720

Frco colored.

12 11 68

1 6 26 71 2 1 3 2 47

2 49 80 5

Slaves.

2,334 4,310 3,554 7,869 6,021 8,467 2,897 1,1185 2,314 2,501

848 6,690

103 7.898 5,139

124 5,055 1,383 4,514

422 5,255 5,941

721 2,049

254

887 7,120 3,718 1,701

532

Deaf In IQTotal. & dunib. sane. ivtic 4,055 2

2
7,884

1
8,836
13,730
12,168 3
18,816

3 4
4,809 4
3,411

1 2
5,788

6

4 5.566 1

4 2,723

1 11,809 3

2
2,398

1 4
14,882 2 11 6
7,869 1 1
4,084
10,172

3
10.726 2
10,882 3
2,173 1
9.676
11,516 3 6 8

2,384
4,588
3,090 3
1,921
10,510
9,070

2
9,748 9

16 2,262 1

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10 13

2 92 69 29 15

2 28 12

10

Total...

571,534 439,592

3,292

1,014,418 299

400 442

EMIGRATION AND PAUPERISM.
The effect of emigration in reducing pauperism in England is striking in the
following tables. The hope may be entertained that the people are no longer
paupers when they arrive here. It appears that during the last seventeen years
3,596,500 emigrants have quitted the United Kingdom, or, on an average,
211,564 annually. The maximum emigration in any one year was reached in
1852, and the minimum in 1843; the totals being 368,764 and 57,212 respec-
tively. Last year's return embraces a total of 120,432 emigrants, a pumber
considerably below the average, but slightly in excess of 1858. The great bulk
of the emigration has been to the United States, as will be seen by the follow-
ing table, which illustrates the destination of every 100 emigrants :
Aus- Mis-

Aug. Mis
British United tra- cella-

British United tra cella-
Year.
America. States. lia. Deous.

Year.

America. States. lia. nevas, 1843..

41
49
7 3
1852.....

9
66

1
1844..
32 62

3 3
1853.

10 70 19 1
1845.... 34 62
1 3 1854..

60 25 1 1846.... 34 63

1
1855..

10 59 29 2 1847.....

42
65
2 1 1856..

9 63

26

2 1848.... 13 76

2 1857..

10 60 29 1 1849.. 14 11 2 1858..

8 52 35
1850.....
12 79

6 3
1859.....

58

27 10 1851.....

80

6 1 Political and family ties, and the comparative cheapness of land, have no doubt induced the extraordinary tendency in favor of the United States ; but it

13

cannot but be a matter of regret to see Canada at such a low ebb in the emi. grant market. Australia (which the foregoing analysis includes also New Zealand) has, it will be observed, succeeded in holding its own since the gold dis. coveries in 1852. It will be interesting to note the effects of the exodus between 3,000,000 and 4,000,000 persons on the home labor market; and, judging from the amount of pauperism, the results have been in the highest degree beneficial. The great bulk of the emigrants have been Irish, and pauperism has almost vanished from the Emerald Isle. Thus, the total number of paupers of all classes in receipt of relief in each year has been as follows, (in England and Ireland the returns are made in January, and in Scotland in May) :Year. England. Scotland.

England. Scotland. Ireland. 1849. 934,110 82,3.7 620,747 1855.

851,369 79,887 1850... 920,513 79,031 307,970 1856.

877,467 79,973 73,033 1851.. 850,893 76,906 209,180 1857.

843,806 79,217 56,094 1852.. 831,424 75,111 171,418 | 1858.

908,186 79,199 50,582 1833.... 798.822 75,437 141,822 1869.

860,170 78,501 44,866 1854....... 818,337 78,929 106,802 | 1860.

851,020

44,929 The totai for the three kingdoms, which thus stood at 1,637,223 in 1849, had been reduced in 1859 to 983,537 -a fact certainly of some social significance.

Ireland. | Year.

86.819

STATISTICS OF MARRIAGE. According to the official returns of the last census of England and Wales, there appeared to be a determinate inequality in the relative proportion of the sexes—the total number of females of all ages, as compared with that of males, being as 53 to 47. This excess of females is not due to a primary inequality of births, but to the number of males constantly resident in or emigrating to foreign lands, and to the greater general mortality among them, resulting from casualties incident to their pursuits, to travel, and to war, from which women are in a great measure exempt. On investigation, however, of the distribution of the sexes, according to those proportions, into married and single, a remarkable diversity appears in the respective results, not so easily or satisfactorily accounted for, since the number of spinsters exceeds that of bachelors much more than might have been inferred from the respective proportions of the sexes. Between the ages of 20 and 40, the married women of England and Wales are to the spinsters and widows as 57 to 43, or, in round numbers, as 4 to 3 ; while the married men of corresponging ages are to the bachelors and widowers as 70 to 30! This surprising disproportion indicates an unaccountable diversity in the liabilities or disposition to celibacy in the two sexes.

In the present advanced state of science, it has been determined that no event is fortuitous, but may be referred to some definite antecedents, and be subjected to valuation. Every possible contingency of life is susceptible of calculation, so that the probabilities for or against its occurrence may be represented in arithmetical numbers, or estimated in current coin of the realm. Though no exact data exist for determining the absolute chances of marriage for each person, yet they may be approximately indicated, and we have the pleasure of presenting to our fair readers a table showing the probabilities in favor of marriage at different ages, for the various conditions of life, calculated on the same scientific principles as ordinary tables for life assurance, from the returns of the reg. istrar general, the distinguished professional gentleman, in whose accuracy every confidence may be reposed :

20..

19

10

30. 35. 40.

45.

1 to

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PROBABILITIES OF MARRIAGES AT GIVEN AGES FOR ALL CONDITIONS OF LIFE, COMPUTED

FROM THE BEGISTRAR GENERAL'S REPORT FOR 1857.
Age.

Bachelors. Spinsters. Widowers. Widows.
10 to

10 to 18 10 to 387 10 to 194
25.
1 to 3 1 to 5

1 to

9 1 to 6 1 to

1 to 15 1 to 7 1 to 1 to 27 1 to 35 1 to 6 1 to

6 1 to 64 1 to 73 1 to 6 1 to 6

1 to 155 1 to 169 1 to 8 1 to 9 50.

1 to 346 1 to 442 1 to 10 1 to 14 55. 1 to 826 1 to 1292 1 to 15

28 60.

1 to 2820 1 to 4283 1 to 22 1 to 47 From this it will be observed that at twenty the probabilities of marriage for & spinsters, while slightly exceeding those of a bachelor of the same age, are infinitely greater than those of the widowed of either sex ; or in other words, that the proportion of widowed at that age is much less than that of the upmarried. After 20 the probabilities both of spinster and bachelor continuously decrease ; those of the bachelor, however, being always greater at all after ages, while those of the widowed of both sexes as rapidly increased up to 35—the widowers always retaining the advance. At 35 the chances of marriage for the widow, as compared with those of the spinster, are as 7 to 1 ; that is, that 7 may be wagered to 1 on the widow marrying first--a rather remarkable fact, though not opposed to experience; but whether that number represents the greater attractivness of widows at that age, or their greater desire of marriage, we will not rashly venture to decide. At 60, the probabilities are for the widower 128 times better than that of the old bachelor ; and those of the widow 95 times greater than of the spinster, though only half the probabilities of the widower. The numbers below the ages of 20 and above 60 have been rejected as too insignificant to be estimated. Seeing from this table, how rapid the chances of celibacy increase after 20, and how quickly the unwise habit becomes confirmed, let those who are discreet “gather their roses while they may !"

POPULATION OF TURKEY, A contemporary, in speaking of the proposed interference of Russia in behalf of the Christian population of Turkey, says that “the Christians are thinly scattered among a warlike people,” (the Turks,) who have not forgotten their old Tartar instincts of plunder and oppression. Now, so far from the Christians being “ thinly scattered,” they far outnumber the Mohammedans. The last reliable census of the Ottoman Empire gives Turkey in Europe 6,004,921 Mussulmen and 10,435,079 Christians-nearly two to one of the former. As this question is doubtless one to come again prominently before the world, we have thought it best to give a table containing the population of European Turkey, which may be useful for future reference. We will also state that the whole Ottoman Empire (if we include Egypt, Nubia, Sennaar, Tripoli, Barka, Fez, and Tunis, all of which are claimed to be under the sway of the Sultan) cortaivs about 36,000,000 of inhabitants. The African possessions are little more than nominal dependencies, and so it may be said in regard to some of the Sultan's provinces in Arabia, which, singularly enough, include a portion of Western Africa ; but in matters of religion and war Islam knows but one head and one heart. The descendant of Osman, Abdul-Medjid Khan, of Stamboul,

is the earthly leader of every true follower of Mobammed. The total population of European Turkey is 16,440,000, and in the annexed statistics we can see wbat great interests nominal Christians have there, and why Russia feels so deeply in regard to Turkey in a politico-religious point of view :Mohammedans. Christians.

Mohammedans, Christians. Bosnia.....

953,676 896,824 Roumelia...... 647,004 761,996 Servia...

Yania....

253,328 674.672 Wallachia.... 3,000 4,070,000 Salonica.

474,464 483,536 Moldavia..

Crete.

93,112 118.886 Widdin. 503,645 596,355 Stamboul.

629,520 330.480 Silistria

1,018,680 181,320 Archipelago..... 114,360 305,640 Adrianople.... 453,732 996,268 Nisch 477,172 676,828

6,004,921 10,435,079 356,228 342,772 Total........

16,410,000 The total population of Asiatic Turkey is about 16,050,000, of which doubtless more than 10,000,000 are nominal Christians.

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MERCANTILE MISCELLANIES.

DIMENSIONS AND CAPACITY OF THE GREAT EASTERN. The priucipal dimensions, caliber of the machinery, and general accommodations of this truly colossal specimen of genius, enterprise, and industry, are as follows:-Length between the perpendiculars..

680 feet Length on the upper deck....

692 feet Breadıb from side to side of hull.

83 feet Breadth across the paddle boxes.

120 feet Depth from deck to keel......

53 feet Length of forecastle....

140 feet Height of forecastle..

8 feet Total length of principal saloons.

400 feet Height of saloons on lower deck

13 ft. 8 in. Number of saloons...

6 Height of saloons on upper deck..

12 feet Number of saloons...

6 Length of upper saloons..

70 feet Length of lower saloons..

60 feet Number of decks .

4 Number of main traverse bulkheads or watertight compartments... .

12 Do. partial...... Longitudinal bulkheads ruoning fore and aft at a distance of 35 feet apart for a length of 350 feet

7 Width of space between the two skins of ship..

2 feet 10 in. Thickness of iron plates in keel.

1 inch Do. inner and outer skins.

1 inch Bulkheads.... Iron decks

inch Plates of iron used in the construction of the hull

30,000 Number rivets used in fastening the plates....

8,000,000 Weight of iron used in the construction, about.

10,000 tons Tonnage....:

22,600 tons To carry

18,000 tons Quantity of coal which can be carried for voyages.

11,379 tons Weight of ship, engines, &c., as at its launcbing..

2,000 tons Immersion of this weight....

15 ft. 6 in. Draught of water, laden.

30 feet light

20 feet

1 inch

coal and cargo...

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ARCTIC EXPEDITION. On Saturday, July 7th, the Arctic expedition of Dr. Hayes sailed from the port of Boston. The event excited a great deal of interest, and drew together quite a large crowd on the wharf, while the decks of the vessel were crowded with a large number of distinguished individuals, among whom was Gorernor N. P BANKS, who has evinced a readiness at all times to advance the progress of the expedition. The vessel and all its outfit were formally presented to Dr. Hayes, and he was assured by the Bystou committee of their entire confidence in his integrity, ability, and honesty. Dr. Hayes, in accepting the gift of the vessel, and the honor and trust conferred upon him, made an eloquent speech, during which he was frequently interrupted by expressions of kindly sentiments on the part of gentleman prezent; and the doctor took this occasion to introduce the officers and crew to those present, and complimented them on their courage in joing him in his journey.

The following is a list of the officers and crew :-Commander, Dr. Isaac J. HAYES ; astronomer and second in command, August Sontag ; sailing master, S. P. McCormick; mate, H. W. Dodge; captain's clerk, G. F. Knoor; assistant astronomer, Henry G. Radcliff ; carpenter, Gibson Caruthers ; cabin boy, Colex C. Starr; steward, FRANK L Ilarris; cook, Joun WILLIAMS; crew, CHARLES McCORMICK, WILLIAM MILLER, HARVEY S. Heywood, THOMAS F. Browne, John McDonald, and Thomas Bowman. The expedition carries no surgeon other than the commander. There will be neither an artist nor a photographist on board, although the vessel has a splendid set of photographic instruments, which will undoubtedly be used by Mr. Sontag, who is a very good artist.

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