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VALUATION AND TAXATION IN CINCINNATI. The Cincinnati Gazelle of a recent date has the following statement in reference to the valuation of property and tax levy in Cincinnati and Hamilton :

We give first the taxable basis or grand levy of the city, applicable as an estimate for the year 1860, for the official action of the council, and the revenue derived therefrom:-

VALUATION OF THE CITY.

Value of lots with improvements in seventeen wards......
Value of personal property in the same..
Value of personal property in railroads, insurance companies, and other

corporations, with additions by Board of Equalization...

$61,428,917 26,483,458

4,049,602

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Total amount levied in city.....

$1,666,145 25 The last item mentioned in the above is the special levy on each lineal foot of the frontage on the lines of water pipe, as provided for by the act of 1856.

We give next the taxable basis or grand levy of the county, applicable as an estimate for the year 1860, for the official action of the three County Commissioners, and the distribution for general county expenses :

VALUATION OF THE COUNTY. Value of lands....

$17,049,369 00 Value of lots...

64,970,382 00 Value of personal property..

33,415,039 00 Total........

$115,434,790 00 Taxable value of couoty other than city

25,651,165 00 Taxable value city

87,780,625 00

DISTRIBUTION-FOR GENERAL COUNTY PURPOSES.

8 mills on the dollar, on $2,000,000 taxable value, produce....

$6,000 00 2 mills on the dollar, on $4,000,000 taxable value, produce..

8,000 00 1.50 mills on the dollar, on $6,000,000 taxable value, produce...

9,000 00 1.25 mills on the dollar, on $10,000,000 taxable value, produce.... 50,000 00 1 mill on the dollar, on $63,434,796 taxable value, produce....

63,434 79 Taxable basis $115,434,790, producing......

$136,434 79 There is an additional levy of 1.1819 of one mill for public buildings or payment of debts.

TAXABLE VALUATION OF MISSISSIPPI. The Auditor's report of the State of Mississippi gives the following statement of the taxable value for 1859:Land..... acres 20,085,173 $139,887,168 Slaves and cattle sold..... $288,704 Money at interest

8,573,445 res .....No. 13, 2,123 08 Stocks...

650,125 Watches...

15,732 958,612 Merchandise brought into the

Clocks.

17,349 162,937 State....

12,355,646 Merchandise sold at auction 44,421

Total

$165,146,910 Liquors sold at auction

202,161

FAILURES IN LONDON IN 1858-59. The pressure of the Italian War for an idea, produced the following financial results in London :LIST OF FAILURES IN LONDON, ETC., FROM NOVEMBER 1, 1858, to OCTOBER 31, 1859. NOVEMBER, 1958.

Lutteroth & Co., Trieste, merchants,

Cresswell & Sons, Birmingham, ironmasters. Plowes. Son & Co., Rio Janeiro, merchants. W.J. Grey & Son, Newcastle, coalfitters.

A. Sevastopulo & Sons, London, Mediteranean

trade. Cowan & Bigg, London and Newcastle, ship and insurance brokers.

Frommel & Co., Augsburg, bankers. Pickworth & Walker, Sheffield, builders.

The Bank of Thuringia. James Hyde & Co., Honduras, merchants.

JUNE, James Davies & Sun, London, boot and shoe Stevens Brothers, Liverpool, East India agents manufacturers.

and merchants. DECEMBER

Robert Brandt & Co., London, merchants. Hicks & Gadsden, London, American merchants.

JULY. Metcalf & Co., West Ham, distillers.

Calnta Brothers, London, Greek trade. Forcheimer & Co., Prague, worsted spinners.

Carter & Martin, Belfast, flax trade.
M. P. Poppe, Antwerp, vil and seed merchant.

James Kennedy & Son, Belfast, flax trade.
JANUARY, 1859.

Hull Brothers, Belfast, fax trade.
M. Demetriadi, Manchester, Greek trade. McConnell & Kennedy, Beltast, flax trade.
John Syinons & Co., Manchester, commission

AUGI'ST.
agents.
Bryant & Davies, London, commis'n merchants.

A. di Demetrio & Sons, London, Greek merch'ts.

E & A. Prior, London, coal merchants.
Prior, Turner & Co., London, Naples, and Paler-
mno, Neapolitan trade.

SEPTEMBER
FEBRUARY

Mazurra & Co., Ilavana, Spanish trade.

W. II. Duncker, Hamburg, general merchant. Bodin, Lichtenstein & Co., Marseilles, merchants. J. B. Kempe, St. Petersburg, tallow trade. MARCII.

Kovrigni & Co., St. Petersburg, tallow trade. Gutteman, Brothers & Co., Genoa, merchants.

CC. Ingate & Son, London, Mediterranean

trade. APRIL.

OCTOBER Aquarone, Fils, Porro & Co., Marseilles, merch'ts.

J. & W. Pattison, Melbourne, contractors and MAY

general dealers. Wolf & Co., Berlin, bankers.

Fairfax & Co., Sydney, merchants. Lloyd, Beilby Co., London, Anstralian trade. Alexeieff & Co., Moscow, general merchants. Arnstein & Eskeles, Vienna, bankers.

M. Gutschkoff, Moscow, manufacturer.

STATISTICS OF POVERTY.
The New York News, speaking of pawnbroking establishments, says :-

We learn that there are fifty-eight licensed pawnbrokers in the city. There are, beside, numerous places where a similar business is done by persons under the description of loan offices. It is somewhat counter to our usual notions on this subject that, when times are flush, the pawnbrokers do the most business, turning their capital over frequently, while in hard times, when employment is difficult, the pledge remains long, or perhaps is left unredeemed.

The following is the result of the business of the pawnbrokers on the eastern side of the city :No.

No. No. Amount. pledges. No.

Amount. pledges. 1.. $250,000 46,000 17...

$5,200 12,600 75,000 75,000 18..

10,000 28,500 3.. 30.000 40,000 19..

15,000 22,500 4.. 40,000 60,000 20..

5,000 10,000 5.. 12,000 20,000 21.

23,400 30,403 6.. 9,300 27,000 22.

39.000 32,519 7.. 75.000 110,000 23..

18,500 40,000 8.. 35,000 55,000 24..

10,000 25,000 9.. 41,400 70,000 / 25..

20,000 80,000 10..

11,500
11,500 26..

10,000 40,000 11. 250,000 90.000 27..

12,500 20,000 13.... 130,000 70,000 28.

30,000 40,000 14..

36,700 624,000 15...

25,000 44,000 Total....... $1,237,000 1,754,222 16...

15,000 23,000 On the west side it is assumed that there is about an equal amount of business,

2..

raising the number of pledges to 3,250,000, and the amount loaned to over $2,000.000 One singular fact is mentioned, that on the average not more than from 10 to 15 per cent of the pledges remained unredeemed, showing that the pawnbroker exerts an influence that is ratber conducive to the comfort of the poor than to their ruin. The articles they receive form a fund to provide against an emergency somewhat like the deposit in a savings bank, and the hope of re. gaining them unquestionably acts as powerful stimulus to exertion.

DEBT OF RUSSIA.
The following shows the consolidated debt of Russia at this time:-
Foreign debt....

.silver roubles 367,000,000 or £57.343,000 luternal debt..

152,000,000 or 23,750,000

Total consolidated debt....

519,000,000 or £81,093,000

FLOATING DEBT.

Treasury bills falling due at fixed dates..sil. roub. 102,000,000 or £15,937,000 Bills of the government credit establishments payable on presentation

1,013,000,000 or 153,281,000 Paper money.

735,000,000 or 114,843,000 Total floating debt...

1,850,000,000 or 289,061,000 Grand total.......

2,369,000,000 or 370,154,000 The above sum does not include the last loan of £12,000,000, contracted by Messrs. Tuouson, Bonar & Co., in 1859.

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BANK PROFITS, An examination of the quarterly returns of the banks of this city, shows that the profits of one are 219 per cent above par, two above forty per cent, and one above thirty-five per cent of the whole the following is the general result as to the fifty-five banks, on the 30th June, 1860 :Above Above

Above 219 per cent...

1
15 per cent...

2 7
per cent.....

8 40 2 14 2 6

1 35 1 13 2

5 28 2 12

7 4 22 1 11 2 3

3 21 1 10 S

2 19 1 9

5 16

8 The average exceed eleven-and-a-half per cent, or $3,055,000 pet profits against a capital of $69,758,000.

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JULY DIVIDENDS, We publish, says the Charleston Mercury, the following statement of July dividends payable in Charleston, which, in accordance with our well-established custom, we have obtained from reliable sources :South Carolina Railroad Company, 34 per cent....

$203,683 Bank of Charleston, 3 per cent.

110,628 People's Baok, 5 per cent

50,000 Charlestoa Insurance and Trust Company, $5 per share.

50,000 Charleston Gas Light Company, $1 25 per share

38,286 State Baok, 87. cents per share.

35,000 Union Bank, $1 75 per share..

35,000 Plantera' and Mechanica' Bank, 87, cepts per sbare..

35,000 Bank of South Carolina, $150 per share...

33,333 Southwestern Railroad Bank, 75 cents per share..

26,174 South Carolina Insurance Company, $2 60 per share..

25,000

Total..

$642,104

STATISTICS OF TRADE AND COMMERCE.

WOOL TRADE. The following from Messrs. Bond & Co.'s wool circular, of Boston, shows the imports of wool into Boston for the first half of the years—

1855. 1856. 1857. 189 1819. 1860. England..... 122,245 37,517 27,316 134,752 1,647,852 312,312 Buenos Ayres..

440,558 1,364,748 789,614 1,000,814 2,797,241 2.073,123 France..

9,767 33,691 343,997 19,180 833,905 329,757 Turkey.. 1,332,537 1,390,430 1,812,187 1,272,671 1.744,344 990).909 Cape G. Hope. 117,683 183,427 371,864 799,310 1,952,457 3,197,937 Malta. 76.500 191,660

97.009 Chili and Peru. 1,526,568 1,647,082 1,756,961 2,523,459 2,199,190 1,5014,145 Russia...

291,(154

12,939 East Indies.

213 258,362 231,599 Sundries. 3,660

2,810 68,105 78,592 1:23,595

Total....... 3,553,018 4,735,395 5,592,493 5,882,804 11,620,461 8,767,977

CLASSIFIED TABLE OF WOOLS IMPORTED INTO BOSTON FOR THE THREE YEARS PRECEDING

AND THE THREE YEARS SUCCEEDING THE TARIFF OF 1857.
Carpet. Common. Fine.

Carpet. Common. Fine. 1854.. 9,149,000 2,635,000 1,609,000 1857.. 9,281,000 4,443,000 4,217,000 1855.. 5,775,000 1,207,000 264,000 1853.. 6,291,000 1,369,000 2,990,000 1856.. 6,656,000 835,000 931,000 1859.. 7,724,000 3,597,000 6,856,000

Total. 21,580,000 4,677,000 2,804,000 | Total. 23,295,000 9,409,000 13,963,000

47 41

VALUE OF 0010 FLEECE WOOL IN OCTOBER OF EACH YEAR FROM 1810 TO 1859. Fine. Medium. Coarse.

Fine. Medium. Coarse. 1840..

45
36 31 1850..

12 1841..

50
45 40 1851..

38
1842..
price all round 335 a 35 1852..

49 45 40 1843.. 41 35 30 1853..

55 5) 43 1844.. 42 37 32} 1854..

41 36 321 1845..

361
30 26 1855..

50 42 31 1846. 34 30 26j 1856..

50 47 37 1847. 33+ 29 25 1857..

56 49 41 1818..

32 38
1858..

53 46 36 1849..

41 37 32
1859..

58 49 35

34

For 1857 we give the price in August, there having been no sales in October.

This shows a falling off this year from last of about 3,000,000 lbs. First, in common clothing wools from France and England, these having advanced in Europe while they have barely held their own here. Secondly in coarse carpet wools from Buenos Ayres, Chili, and Turkey. On the other hand, the importation of fine wools from the Cape of Good Hope bas increased over fifty per cent. Another table shows the actual prices ob:ained in this market for Ohio fleece wools for 20 years. By this it appears that in October, 1859, fine wools sold for 13c. per lb. more than the average price of the whole 20 years, and that the average price for the three years since July, 1857, during which wool costing 20c. and under has been admitted free, was 6c. per pound above the average of the three preceding years and 12c. above the average of the eleven years of the tariff of 1846. The proportionate value of medium wool does not very mate

rially from this. The third table shows that during the three years of free wool under 20c. the importation of common clothing wool has been 100 per cent, and of fine 400 per cent. larger than in the three years immediately preceding, while the increase in the importation of carpet wools bas hardly been enough to notice. The second table shows an increase in the value of common wools. This we think is in

great measure owing to the fact that in consequence of large accumulations of this grade in France and England, made prior to 1857, and which is but just now reduced, European manufacturers have been able to supply our markets with goods made therefrom on better terms than the manufacturers of this country, as will be seen by the following extract from the export returns of the British government for the past three years :

EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES.

1867. 1858. 1859. Cloths of all kinds, duffies and kerseymeres. .pcs. 258,356 129,873 140,714 Mixed stuffs, finnnels, blankets, and carpets..yds. 33,613,353 38,442,180 55,607,019

The first class of goods are mostly made of fine wool, and the second of low clothing and carpet wools. Now, allowing that it requires but one pouud of raw wool, in average marketable condition, to make each yard of these goods, it appears that during the three years, we have imported from Great Britain alone 127,693,587 lbs. of wool in manufactured goods, while the entire importation of raw wool for the same time into Boston, of common clothing and carpet grades has been 32,700,000 lbs., and into the United States probably not exceeding 60,000,000 lbs. The advance before noticed in these wools in Europe already begins to manisest itself in a decline in this class of goods from Great Britain to this country, while the same returns show a slight increase in esports of fine woolens bither during the current year. The severity of the past winter in England was fatal 10 a large portion of the flock in some sections, creating a scarcity of low combing wools, and creating a demand for the clip of Canada, which beretofore has been mostly consumed in this country.

SUGAR AND COFFEE IN HAYTI. In 1776 the unrefined sugar of St. Domingo was estimated at 92,000,000 lbs., and the white sugar at 65,000,000 lbs. These two articles, without counting 18,000,000 lbs. syrup, brought in a revenue of from twenty-five to thirty million francs. This was the highest point of cultivation it reached since the importation of the sugar cane from Spain, in 1643. There was no change in the amount produced from '76 to '89, when it commenced declining, and continued the downward road until about 1815. In 1806, during the European blockade, a pound of white sugar was worth its weight in gold. It was then that the French chemists, stimulated by Napoleon, endeavored to find a substitute. Premiums were offered to those who should succeed in extracting sugar from native vegetables. The discovery of Mangraff, a Berlin chemist, was remembered. He it was wbo, in 1745, found that beet root contained sugar similar to that of the cane, and in as great proportion. The project was revived, and the manufacture of beet root sugar established, which has since regularly progressed. Under the first empire the amount produced reached very nearly 17,000,000 kilogrammes, and to-day it exceeds the enormous figure of 130,000,000 kilogrammes.

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