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LAKE VESSELS ON THE OCEAN. To see a vessel hailing from Detroit and other ports on the lakes is becoming a frequent occurrence. Within three years past ten barks, five brigs, forty.one schooners, one propeller, and eight tug boats have left the lake waters and are now employed in salt water service. These vessels, with the exception of the tugs, represent 18,035 tons. Two of the barks and one schooner are Canadian vessels. These lake vessels are readily distinguished by any one conversant with ships, by having a very short bowsprit, straight stem, and appliances for “ tricing up" the jibboom and head gear so that they may be enabled to pass through the locks on the canals. Only three of this fleet have been lost. The first was the Colonel Cook, which was lost in the Gulf of St. Lawrence in 1858. The Republican, of Huron, Ohio, was lost off the Coast of Florida last spring, and the last was the bark Magenta, of Green Bay, Michigan, which left Boston for London, July 7. She was abandoned at sea July 22d, and her crew arrived at Liverpool early this month. The trade between Liverpool and the lake ports is not unfrequently made direct. The J. F. Warner cleared from Liverpool, July 29, for Cleveland, Ohio, and the Canada bark F. F. Park sailed from the same port direct for Montreal and Detroit. As the times on the lakes seem to have a better look for the fall trade, several of these vessels are ordered back. The Sophia Smith, J. W. Holt, and Fashion have already received their orders to return. Had this state of things been predicted six years ago, the most far-sighted of the lakemen would not have believed it. But a variety of circumstances have tended to bring the lake vessels into our coasting trade, as well as to induce them to go across the Atlantic. From their flat build they make excellent cotton traders, and large numbers of them are engaged in that branch of our coasting trade. The schooper G. D. Dorisman was reported Aug. 1st bauling out of Royal Albert dry dock, at Passage West, Cork, after undergoing repairs. The schooner Forest City, Capt. Lovell, cleared from Boston, a few days ago for Albany and Troy.

COMMERCE OF NEW ORLEANS. In its very valuable annual tables, the New Orleans Prices Current remarks:

In our last annual review, we had occasion to notice the disturbing influence upon commerce and finance of the war in Italy, and its depressing effect on cotton, notwithstanding which the season's operations in that great staple had appeared very satisfactory to the planting interest, having embraced the disposition of the largest crop thus far ever produced, while prices had been maintained above the average of the smaller crop of the previous year. The production of cotton for the year now under review has shown a further large increase in amount and value, and with the return of peace in Europe, and prosperous manufacturing interests at home and abroad, the crop has been disposed of at an average range of remunerative prices. The increase of the crop for the year

year before.

just closed, over that of the year immediately preceding, amounts to fully 800,000 bales, and exceeds that of the previous year over 1,500,000 bales, and the increase in value for the total crop, delivered at all the ports, compared with last year, amounts to fully $20,000,000, and over $50,000,000 compared with the

The value of our products received from the interior during the past season, according to our annual valuation table, amounts to the large total of $185,211,254, against $172.952,664, showing an increase over last year of $12.258,590, and over 1857-58 of $18,055,708. To refer back ten years, we find an increase over 1849-50 of $88,313,381, equal to fully 90 per cent. This is certainly a very fair exhibit of the progress of trade in our city, and a corresponding advance is promised for the future in the internal improvements which have been carried forward during the year in our own and adjoining States. The New Orleans, Jackson, and Great Northern Railroad has established connections with other great thoroughfares which place us in direct communication with the richest portions of our Southern interior, and with nearly all parts of the country-West, North, and East; and the New Orleans, Opelousas, and Great Western Road begios to open to our commerce the richest producing regions of the South and West, heretofore so difficult of access, and promises at no distant day to bring us a largely increased share of the productions of Texas.

According to the Custom-house records the total value of exports to foreign countries, of produce and merchandise of the growth and manufacture of the United States, and of foreign merchandise, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1860, was $108,393,567, against $101,634,952 last year; showing an increase of $6,758,615. Of the value of exports coastwise the Custom-house has kept no record since 1857, but an estimate which we have made from our own tables enables us to state that the amount is about $30,000,000; thus makivg the total value of our exports foreign and coastwise $138,393,567. The value of foreign merchandise and specie imported in the same period was $22,920,849, against $18,349,516 last year; showing an increase of $4,571,333. There is no record of the value of the numerous cargoes of domestic and foreign merchandise and produce received coastwise, but its amount would count by tens of millions. TABLE SHOWING THE RECEIPTS OF THE PRINCIPAL ARTICLES FROM THE INTERIOR DUR

ING THE YEARS ENDING 31st AUGUST 1859 AND 1860, WITH THEIR ESTIMATED AVERAGE AND TOTAL VALUE.

-1859.

-1860. Articles.

Amount. Av. price. Value. Amount. Av. price. Value. Apples

.bbls. 43,320 $8 00 $346,560 67,416 $5 00 $337,080 Bacon..bhds, & csks. 35,491 90 00 3,194,190 45,015 90 00 4,051,350 Bacon.... .bxs. 3,815 40 00 152,600 5,987 15 00 89,805 Bacon hams.hhds. &c. 37,829 70 00 2,648,030 37,814 55 00 2,079,770 Bacon in bulk... lbs. 10.000 8

39,000 8

3,120 Bagging. ... pieces 34,706 14 00 485,884 21,427 15 00 321,405

...coils 127,321 900 1,145,889 125,429 9 00 1,128,861 Beans.... ...bbls. 7,771 5 00

38,855 8,889 4 50 40,000 Butter.. kegs & firks. 25,113 10 00 251,130 38,345 10 00 383,450 Butter..

547 35 00 19,145 1,506 35 00 52,710 Beeswax....

9 50 00

430 Bran. sacks

216,677 1 25 270,846 Beef.

..bbls. 50,671 13 00 658,723 35,318 12 00 423,816 Beef..

..trcs. 3,883 20 00 77,660 9,616 18 00 173,088 Beef, dried.. lbs. 27,700 10 2,770 93,726

9,372 ..bales 1,774,298 53 00 92,037,794 2,255,448 48 50 109,389,228 Corn meal.....bbls.

72 5 00

360

538 3 00 1,614 Corn in ear...

5,000 1 00 5,000 36,092 1 00 36,092 Corn, shelled..sacks 759,438 2 00 1,518,876 1,722,039 1 75 3,013,568 Cheese..... .boxes 60,533 3 50 211,865 35,596 3 50 124,586 Candles...

86,434 8 00 691,472 110,405 7 00 772,835 Cider.........bbls.

21 8 00

168 Coal, western ...... 2,145,000 45 965,250 2,900,000 40 1,160,000 Dried apples & p'ch's 468 12 00 5,616 1,121 12 00 13,452

800

Bale rope

......bbls.

10

Cotton ..:

Hides...

...bales

85

-1859.

-1860. Articles,

Amount. Av. price. Value. Amount. Av. price. Value. Feathers ......bags 1,373 50 00 68,650

936 22 00 20,592 Flaxseed .trcs.

292 12 00 3,504 375 12 00 4,500 Flour..... .bbls. 1,084,978 6 00 6,509,868 965,860 6 25 6,036,625 Furs hhds., bdls., &c. 229

85,000 151 15 00 2,265 Glassware... ...pkgs. 61,029 5 00

305,145

68,879 5 00 344,395 Hemp ..bales 11,220 20 00

224,400
4,883 21 00

102,543 ....No. 109,232 3 00 327,696 163,568 3 00 490,704 Нау.

107,141 3 75 401,778 152,659 4 70 717,497 Iron, pig........tons 488 30 00 14,640 643 30 00 19,290 Lard....bbls. & trcs. 78,564 30 00 2,356,920 65,784 30 00 1,973,520 Lard ......kegs 63,592 6 00 381,552 90,699 6 00 544,194 Leather .......bdls. 6,985 30 00 209,550 6,115 30 00 183.450 Lime, western .bbls. 27,182 1 10 29,900 33,143 1 65 54,685 Lead...........pigs 75,023 6 00 450,138 80,964 5 00 404,820 Lead, bar.kegs & bxs. 410 22 00 9,020 1,658 17 50 29,015 Lead, white...., kegs 978 2 00 1,956 1,842 3 00 5,526 Molasses.(crop,).gals. 24,887,760 26 6,470,817 17,858,100

6,250,335 Oats....bbls. & sacks 249,736 1 50 374,604 659,550 2 00 1,319,100 Opions

.bbls. 22,196 5 00 110,980 26,401 6 00 158,406 Oil, linseed...

598 30 00 17,940 1,020 30 00 30,600 Oil, castor.

1,213 50 00 60,650 571 44 00 25,124 Oil, lard 20,377 36 00 733,572 9,333 34 00

317,329 Potatoes..

123,5C2 4 00 494,008 207,698 2 75 571,169 Pork ...trcs. & bbls. 266,580 17 00 4,531,860 216,523 17 00 3,680,891 Pork.... ....boxes 175 40 00 7,000

71 40 00 2,840 Pork....

2,828 70 00 197,960 1,874 70 00 131,180 Pork in bulk.... lbs. 1,969,550

7 417,868 3,803,500 7 266,245 Porter & ale....bbls. 11,466 10 00 114,660 20,940 10 00

209,400 Packing yarn... reels 1,673 5 00 8,365 3,748 6 00 22,488 Rum...

61 20 00 1,220 475 20 00 9,500 Skins, deer ... packs

2,184 20 00

43,680 1,542 20 00 30,840 Shingles.. .M. 6,000 3 50 21,000 7,000 4 00 28,000 Shot

.kegs 2,375 20 40 48,450 4,001 20 40 31,620 Soap ..boxes 13,983 4 00 55,932 12,202 7 00 85,414 Staves

13,706 70 00 959,420 10,178 50 00 508,900 Sugar, (erop,). .bhds. 362,296 69 00 24,998,424 221,840 82 00 18,190,880 Spanish moss.. bales 4,307 16 00 68,912 8,604 14 00 120,456 Tallow........bbls. 855 30 00 25,650 1,025 30 00 30,750 Tobacco, leaf...bhds. 62,925 110 00 6,921,750 67,883 95 00 6,448,885 Tobacco, strips.

11,000 200 00 2,200,000 10,908 185 00 2,017,980 Tobacco, stems... 2,000 20 00 40,000 2,164 15 00 32,460 Tobacco, chew'g.bxs. 9,208 22 00 202,576 14,544 15 00 218,160 Twine ..bdls. & bxs. 4,233 9 00 38,097 3,508 9 00 31,572 Vinegar

1,416 4 00 5,664 1,206 4 00 4,824 Wool..........bags

3,753 35 00

131,355 Whisky .......bbls. 152,915 9 00 1,376,235 185,042 9 00

1,665,378 Wheat.bbls. & sacks 29,585 2 25 66,566 13,116 2 25 29,511 Other various articles, estimated at...... 6,500,000

7,750,000

...hhds.

.......bbls

...M.

.......bbls.

Total value ....

.$172,932,664

$185,211,254

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF VALUE OF IMPORTS TIIROUGI THE CUSTOM-HOUSE, NEW ORLEANS, FOR THE FISCAL YEARS ENDING ON THE 30T1 OF JUNE, FOR SIX YEARS.

1855. 1856. 1857. 1858. 1859. 1860. Dutiable.. 6,939,002 8,990,583 16,417,035 10,247,093 9,952,646 15,196,518 Free..... 4,297,170 6,417,596 6,637,076 4,818,069 6,725,446 5,437,875 Specie.... 4,687,436 1,775,48 1,927,039 4,520,851 1,671,424 2,286,456

Total .... 12,923,608 17,183,327 24,981,150 19,586,013 18,349,516 22,920,840 Exports.. 55,688,552 80,547,963 91,514,186 88,382,438 101,634,952 108,393,567

COMMERCE OF MOBILE. The imports and exports of the port of Mobile liave been for the past eighteen months as follows:Imports. Exports. I

Imports. Exports. 1859...

$982,140 $30,079,711 | 1860, 6 mos.. $617,280 $25,908,820 1858..... 634,626 28,553,736 | 1859, 6 mos.. 549,110 17,287,103

The exports for the first six months of 1860 have exceeded those of the previous year $8.681,717. The exports of cotton for the year ending August 31, were as follows:EXPORTS OF COTTON FROM THE PORT OF MOBILE TO FOREIGN PORTS, WITH THE WEIGHT AND VALUE ATTACHED, FOR THE YEAR ENDING AUGUST 31st, 1860.

Bales.
Pounds.

Value. - Great Britain, in American vessels.... 239,566 154,718,053 $16,921,794 British

146,097 75,760,927 9,021,438

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TRADE OF THE SANDWICH ISLANDS. The official report gives the following biennial returns of the trade of the Islands :-

IMPORTS FOR THE TWO YEARS ENDING DEC. 31st, 1859. In 1858...

$1,089,660 60 In 1859.

1,555,558 74

$2,645,219 34

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Showing excess of imports for this biennial term to be......

$926,807 99

Year.

Total.

From 1853 the imports and exports were as follows :

-Exports.

Excess of
Imports.
Foreigs.
Domestic.

imports. 1853.. $1,281,951 18 $191,597 66 $281,599 17 $472,996 83 $808,954 35 1854.. 1,396,786 24 311,092 97 274,029 70 585,122 67 811,663 57 1855.. 1,306,355 89 297,859 82 274,792 67 572,652 49 733,703 40 1856.. 1,152,412 99 204,545 88 378,998 34 583,554 22 568,868 77 1857.. 1,130,165 41 222,222 19

422,303 91 645,526 10 484,639 31 1858..

1,089,660 60 257,115 97 529,966 11 787,082 08 302,578 52 1859.. 1,555,558 74 302,754 06 628,575 21 931,329 27 624,229 47

This statement shows a gratifying increase in our domestic exports, and a gradual decrease in the excess of imports until the last year, when the excess suddenly run up from $302,578 32 to $624,229 47. This is doubtless to be attributed to the caution of those engaged in commerce, in laying in large stocks of merchandise in anticipation of the change in the tariff, now near at hand.

Since the last report from this department, another market has been opened near us, which promises to be a large consumer of our domestic productions, without calling on us to take anything of foreign manufacture in exchange. I allude to British Columbia, which, from the discovery of gold within its borders, began at once to afford a market for our cattle and the products of our soil.

It is to the agricultural and planting interests that we must chiefly look for gettiog rid of this excess of imports. No policy should therefore be adopted to fetter them; on the contrary, they should receive every encouragement within the limits of legislative discretion.

The new tariff established by the civil code will go fully into effect on the 25th of June pext. But little addition will for some time be made to the revenue from the increased rate of duties which it provides, owing to the large importations which bave lately been made, doubtless, as already intimated, with reference to the change. The last quarters of the fiscal year will however be likely to demonstrate its probable bearings upon the trade of the country.

SPAIN-ITS TRADE AND AGRICULTURE. According to the official returns of Spain for the year 1857, the percentage of upcultivated land was 45.8 ; land under tillage, 26.6 ; grass lands, 14.0 ; woods, copse, garden, etc., 9.0; vinyards, 2.8; olive-grounds, 1.8. The total superfices of ground cultivated as vinyards in 1857 was 3.500,524 Eoglish acres ; the corresponding acreage under vine cultivation in France was in the same year 5,387,230 acres. The value of wine exported from Spain in 1857 was about $23,000,000 ; that of wine exported from France in the same year about $30,000,000.

The total imports in 1850 were $33,600,000; in 1857, $77,770,000 ; being an increase in seven years of 131 per cent. The total exports in 1850 were $24,435,000 ; in 1857, $58,430.000 ; increase in seven years 139 per cent. Of the imports for 1857 Europe supplied $54,904,000 ; Asia, $1,250,000 ; Africa, $1,210,000 ; America, $20,402,000, including $7,857,000 from the United States. Of the exports for 1857 Europe received $38,015,000 ; Asia, $565,000; Africa, $1,210,000 ; America, $18,660.000, including $3,396,500 sent to the United States.

Our Spanish cousins in 1858 possessed 13,749,959 sheep, 2,733,966 goats, 1,380,861 cattle, 1,018,388 swine, 491,690 asses, 415,978 mules, and 268,248 borses.

The number of schools of first instruction in Spain in 1855 was 20,753, affording instruction to 684,657 boys and 320,317 girls. Of these schools 16,709 were public, 3,624 private, and 420 under the care of religious congregations

VOL. XLIII-NO, IV.

31

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