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following table will show at a glance how this aggregate of our mercantile marine is made up, and we add a like account of vessels registered in the colonies also at the end of the year 1859:

Sailing vessels.

Steam vessels. United Kingdom.

Vessels.

Tons. Vessels. Tons. Not over 50 tons

9,690 297,197 761 17,313 Above 50 tons.

16,004 3,829,148 1,157 419,523

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8,952 767,628 278 30,051 Comparing ports with reference to the vessels registered bere, of sailing vessels not above 50 tons 678 (23,216 tons) belong to the port of London, and 276 (9,804 tops) to Liverpool ; but of those above 50 tons only 1,825 (687,407 tons) belong to London, and 1,928 (950,531 tons) to Liverpool. Of the steamers 516 (188,220 tons) belong to London, and only 204 (58,786 tons) to Liverpool. London is ahead in number of vessels, Liverpool in amount of tonnage.

MILK TRADE. In addition to the supply from domestic swill fed manufacture, the city of New York receives, by railroad, 180,000 quarts of milk per day; paying for the same, at seven cents per quart, a yearly aggregate of nearly $5,000,000. This supply is divided among the different roads as follows :New Jersey Central carries, daily..

.quarts 5,000 New York and New Haven..

4,000 Long Island...

10,000 Hudson River..

18,000 Erie....

66,000 Harlem......

80,000 The Harlem Railroad derives an annual revenue of $250,000 from this source.

IMPORTS OF HAMBURG. The following is the total value in mark banco of the trade of Hamburg for the undermentioned years :1845 .... .mark banco 291,881,390 | 1852 .mark banco 392,028,820 1846 281,665,730 1853

443,879,530 1847 301,740,770 | 1854

530,668,030 1848 245,141,950 1855

528,658,190 1849 293,826,640 | 1856

654,772,080 1850 353,136,070 1857

688,849,300 1851 373,277,940 | 1858

502,206,800 The decrease of 1858 shows the effect of the crisis of 1857.

GUTTA PERCHA, Gutta percha differs from caoutchouc in its external characters, being very solid and unyielding at common temperatures, having something of the character of horn, but being quite plastic at two hundred and twelve degrees, at which temperature it can be pressed and moulded into any required form. from the sim. plest form of a tumbler or plate to the richest carving of a picture frame, and The minute lines of a medal.

TRADE IN BREADSTUFFS OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK, MONTHLY TABLE OF EXPORTS TO ALL FOREIGN PORTS, FROM SEPT. 1 TO AUG. 31, FOR

THE FOLLOWING YEARS.

FLOUR-BARRELS.

1859–60. 1858–59. 1857–58. 1856–57. 1855–56. 1854-55. September.. 79,422 92,851 80,776 103,202 111,471 24,302 October

141,157 140,238 169,506 193,896 193,961 34,687 November... 126,641 75,906 171,376 244,639 221,373 19,757 December 139,589 58,266 104,584 205,808 207,052 56,188 January..

49,138 30,930 125,720 110,546 180,839 72,794 February

34,635 36,120 108,982 94,305 126,048 30,244 March

69,193 49,140 73,553 119,655 89,411 22,474 April.

83,445 71,168 124,790 80,128 74,375 40,930 May

103,810 65,492 111,604 78,685 1.24,952 37,608 June..

177,377 56,300 162,877 53,188 329,348 20,834 July

221,607 11,342 173,308 59,919 293,185 33,087 August. ... 239,236 75,006 140,708 68,869 217,754 36,240

Total..... 1,465,250 762,759 1,547,794 1,402,850 2,169,769 459,145 Export, from Sept. 1 to Aug. 31, in 1847-48...

515,222 1846-47.....

2,154,16 i 1845-46......

883,350

...bbls.

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NAUTICAL INTELLIGENCE.

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SALES OF SHIPS. The Ship Owners' Circular gives the following sales of vessels in the past month. Speculative operations in ship property bave been less than during the previous month, consequently the values have been more regular. At the close, there is less disposition to pay the increased rates for tonnage:An a 1 N. York built ship, 1,200 tons register; 10 years old, in order for sea $45,000 11 Maine 1,100 7

38,500 2 Maine

900
10

29,000
1} Massach'st
620

23,000 1 N. York 1,050 9

23,000 24 Massacb'ts

550
24

9,000
440
19

9,000 14 Long Isl'd built bark, 406

4

17,000 1} Massacl'ts 360

14,500 2 Maine 440

10,000 2 Massach'te

340
12

10,000 2 Massach'ts

338
7

8,000 24 Maine

270
12

4,500 2 $ Long Island

330
11

8,000 27 Massach'ts

345
30

3,750
1} N. York
210

10,000 2 Obio built brig 200

9

4,000 2 Philadel.

200
12

4,000 2 Maine

200
10

4,000
23 Nova Scotia
194

1,400 2 Maryland 120

1,800 21 Lake built schooner, 304

8,000 2 Long Island 270

7,750 2 Connecticut “ 190

8

5,000 2 Maine

170
8

4,200 2 New York

200
15

4,000
NEW VESSELS.
A first-class Connecticut built bark, 700 tons register, for $34,000.
A first-class Massachusetts built schooner, 200 tons ; $50 per ton complete.

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THE SHIPPING INTEREST. The shipping of the United States in 1840, according to official reports, amounted to 2,180,764; ip 1845 it was only 2,417,002, an increase of only 236,238 tons, showing an average annual gain of only 47,247 tons. In 1850 the aggregate had increased to 3,535,454, showing a gain in five years of active employment of 1,118,452 ; an annual average of 133,690 tons. Here it will be seen that the annual gain during these five years was nearly equal to the total gain for the previous five years. This was owing to the increase of the carrying trade which had grown out of the war, the heavy exports to Great Britain du. ring the season of crop failures, and the rush to the Pacific in consequence of the gold discovery. This was followed by the advantage given to our ships under the neutral flag during the Crimean war, which commenced actively in 1854, and terminated towards the close of 1856. At the latter date the tonnage of the United States stood at its highest point, the total being 5,212,001 tons, a gain for five years of 1,676,546, even on the large total of 1850, showing an appual average increase of 335,309 tons. In 1856 began the period of de

pression, which has been one of the most disastrous the trade has ever known. The finest ships owned in the country were unprofitably employed at sea, or rotted idly at our wharves. Many shipowners, who had large investments in this floating property, were compelled to suspend, and some were involved in financial ruin. The ship-yards were deserted, and all along our seaboard, from the far Eastern line to the Gulf, ship-building was mostly suspended, and the grass grew rank and green over the mouldering chips. There was no remedy for this, in any description of legislation. The supply of ships, stimulated by the causes we have mentioned, had run ahead of the ordinary uses for this class of property, and the reaction was inevitable. The financial revulsion of 1857 was partly owing to this want of employment for our ships, and it also in turn contributed very much to complete the depression. The tonnage stricken off from the list the next year, part of it from previous losses not supplied by subsequent production, left the official total at 4,871,652 ; and during the five years which have since elapsed, the building in all the United States, instead of showing a gain of over one-and-a-balf millions, as during the previous five years, had not, at latest official accounts, brought us up to the standard of 1855. The revival of the carrying trade in breadstuffs to Great Britain finds the list of available ships greatly reduced—the losses of the sea and the natural decay baviug more than counterbalanced the supply; and now the tide of prosperity has once more set in toward the flood. How long the profitable employment will continue, it is, of course, impossible to determine; but the prospect is certainly encouraging, and we may hope that the years of plenty will at least be as many as the years of famine.

NEW YORK SHIPPING. The arrivals and clearances at New York for the quarter ending September 30th have been as follows:

Arrivals.

-Clearances.
Tons.
Crews.

Tons.

Crows. American 417,824 12,122

343,0544 10,513 Foreigo.... 164,689 7,006

190,8881 7,392

No. 772 373

No. 609 386

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582,513 19,128 995
502,3557 17,095 866
658,5764 18,088 733
515,4533 17,016 763
564,8407 18,641 889
394,3007 12,456 720
532,9374 17,173 837
505,4547 17,147 952
528,0661 17,843 873
489,8274 16,684 792
COASTWISE TRADE.

-Arrivals.
No.

Tons.
374 116,848
427 125,229
396 110,388
436

118,796 403 112,073 511 143,342 425 147,545 408 112,053 413

105,841 898

102,631

1860 1859 1858 1857 1856 1855 1854 1853 1852 1851

-Clearances.
No.

Tons. 1,139 424,584 1,240 450,890 1,172 419,368 1,198 384,184 1,318 370,321 1,182 365,901 1,171 868.793 1,285 838,810 1,167 313,591 1,258 283,564

NAVAL CHANGE. Commodore Pendergast relieved Flag-officer Jarvis, and assumed command of the Gulf squadron on the 20th October, at Aspinwall. As the organization of the fleet has been altogether changed within a few weeks, we subjoin a correct exhibit of its strength under the new arrangement :

Tons. Men. Gans. Flag-ship Cumberland. 1,726 300 24 Stm gupboat Wyandot. 420 100 Stm frigate Powbatan. 2,415 320 10 | Sailing frigate Sabine . 1,726 500 50 Stm corvette Brooklyn. 2,000 300 20 Sail'g corvette St. Louis 700 240 20 Stm gunboat Mohawk.. 450 100 4 Corvette Germantown. 930 300 22 Stm gunboat Crusader. 400 100 5 Stm gunb't Pocabontas. 350 90 4 Total......

11,126 2,350 163

Tons. Men.Guns.

COMMERCIAL REGULATIONS.

RIVER AND FREIGHTS. The Cincinnati Price Current gives the rates of freights to New Orleans as follows:-

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