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Night Soils for Manure..
Note Book, Scrups from..
Norton, John P.
Nurseries, Hovey & Co.'s..

234

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Oats, for Cultivation, Choice of..

68

Safes, Fire-Proof....

37

" 'Mammoth.

Sall, a Preventive of the Potato Disease.

381

« Weight of

«' for Manure

37, 142, 381

Orchards, how to increase Fruitfulness of.
340 Sansage Stuffer...........

334

Treatment of..

.62, 178, 340 Schools, Country .,

66, 128

Oxen, Working..
17 Schonbein's Gun Cotton .....

381
Scraps from my Note Book.

56, 80, 211
Seed and Grain Planter, Pennock's..

255

P.

Seeds, Change of...

Germination of..

.324

Paint, how to remove Smell of....

128

Mode of packing for Voyages...

..324

Para petticoat, Described....

289
Sowing Machine....

..276
Parsnips, Planting of...

74
Steoping of......

100, 151
Paulownia Imperialis, Notice of..

.32, 381 Shad, Salling of....

Peach and Nectarine Trees, on Plum Stocks.

91 Sheep, at the South..

115

Peach Trees, Best time to prune.

269

West..

.31

Leaves of, Poisonons to Sheep.

191

Cheviot...

294

Yellows in..

Cockrill's.

..211

Pears, French Modes of Drying.

233

Destroyed by Dogs.

.178

Pear Trees, Blight in....

121

Husbandry.

.118, 155, 165, 241

Pigs, Poisoned by Berries....

191

Merino.

.15, 46, 278

Pigsties, Plan of Constructing.

365

Merino, Randall's...

475, 278

Pine Leaves, for Manure..

211

On the Prairies..........

Plantations and Farms, Overseers of..

24

Saxon..

344

Plants, Diseased, in Jainaica...

324

Importation of..

.198, 202

how to dry....

Taintors

198

how to transport by Sea.

324

Shearing of...

........ 185

66

Tender, Protection of, in Winter,

Shipping of...

23

Plaster, Application of....

269

Spanish..

..100, 266

Plow, Cotion.

186

Rocky Mountain ...

..149

Cutter, Coulter, and Lock-Coulter..

108 Short-Horn Heifer, Cast of...

6

Eagle..

79 Silk-Culture, Progress of' in U. 8..

Paring...

1-10 | Smithfield, Śhow of fat Cattle.

68

Side-Hill

172 Smut in Wheat....

.272

Plowing, Early.

73

Soap, for Manure..............

Lessons on..

Plum Stocks, for Peach and Nectarine..

.41, 55, 172

91 Soils, Advantage of Mixing.

129

Polenta....
219 Soot, for Manure.....

228
Potato Crop, Failure of...

36
Sperm, How to remove from Cloth

..353
Disease......
..36, 100, 157, 164, 196, 291, 323, 351, 354, 381 Spring Work.....

163

Remedy

. 191, 196, 381, 382

Spurry..

.218

4 Sweet, Large...
197 Squash-Bngs, how to destroy.

234
Washer...
15 Squash, Large..

.355

Potatoos, Culture of..

..61, 150 Suble, The..

..11, 43, 74, 170

Diseased, for Food.

100 Stains in Cloth, how to remove.

.274

for Seed.....

323 Stocking Yarn, making of....

34

from Seeds..

96,

277 Stall Feeding ..

how to preserve

.41, 55, 172

. 129, 165, 191, 337 Stock in New South Wales, Increase of..

1.100

Introduction from South America..

Mixed food for..

12

Irish Mode of Boiling....

339 Strawberry, Culture of...

204

New Varieties, how to produce.

277
Duke of Kent's Vindicated..

947

should not be Mixed.,

233

Illustration of Sexes of..

313

Versns Wheat....

53
Plants, pronf of Sexuality.

201
Unnatural Sprouting of.

291, 324
Question, The...

371

Popular Errors..

294 338 Strawberries, Large..

.229

Postmasters, Hints to.......

Superior English Pine.

312

Poultry, Account of...

99 | Subscribers, Gints to...

and Game, how to preserve Fresh

....9, 37, 41, 69, 361, 371

32 Succotash, how to make..

278

Diseases of.

..142, 241 Suger Crop in New Orleans..

197

Feeding of

35 Sumach, Culture of...

.61

House..

25 Sun Flower

109

Produce, American, Change of Duties on..

100 Stump Machine..

.91

Importation of, into England....

.323, 354 | Swamps and Marshes, Clearing of.

10

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CONTENTS OF VOLUME V.

vii

316

Page. Washington's Department of Agriculture

79 Water, how to make Cool....
281

Ram.....

.62, 218, 283 Watering out of Doors.

333 Weather, Rules..

338 Weeds, Destruction of, in Paved Yards..

303 Weevil, Wheat...

282 Wheat Crop of 1845.

382

Culinre of..
269

Fly, how to kill...
195, 258

Important Fact in Measuring.
329

Row Culture of.....

Seed, Selection of...
..315 Wheel, Carriage, Scripture's...
.224, 366 Wheelbarrow, Ladies'.

27 Whitewash, Superior...
324 Wine, American...

from the Isabella Grape..

Manufacture of.....

Ohio,.......

. 100, 104 Rhubarb, how to make.
321, 380 Woodlands, Sandy, Advice to Owners of.

323 Wool Growing
184

on Western New York Lands ..

305 " Rocky Mountain...

68

“ Sorting of..

Worm, Boll.

Cotton..

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CORRESPONDENTS.

Page. Fielil, Henry A.

Affleck, Thomas.

116, 341 Friend to Health and Honesty.

Agricola..

19 G...

A. A1..

316 G.A..

Allen, R. L...

... 47, 362 Gardener, An Amateur..
Allen, Samuel..

27 Gaston..

A. R. D..

•30, 284 Grazier, An Old...

A. $....

.. 50, 93, 315 G. W.J.

B..

277 H....

Bacon ,w..

365 Hall, Charles Henry
Bartlett, Edwin...

61 Hamilton, Robert..

Beatty, A......

250 Hitchcock, L. W.

Bellows, Wm.

61 Homespun, Dolly..

Bement, C, N

142, 273 Hood, Andrew,

Bingham, L. G...

.79, 112, 225 Horstord, E. N.

Blakeslee, Jacob N...

241 Houston, Samuel.

B. N. H...

93 Huntsman, G. W.

Bowers, J. W...

152 Jarvis, Wm..
Boyle, James.

219 Jayne, Arch'd..

Brown, John.

118 J. B. M.

Browne, D'Jay.

.187, 214, 252, 250, 304, 314 Jenne, Joseph H....

Burguyn, T. Pollok..

158 J. H. ('.

Canadian Naturalist...

218 J. M. C..

Canfield, Henry J.

20 Jones, Wm., and J. & H. C. Smith.

Capell, E. J..

191 Knight, Franklin..

Chandler. Adoniram

304 | L..

Clift, L. D..

124 Leavenworth, Wm..

Cleveland, Wm. P.

113 | Lert

Coke..

..48, 81 Lewis, John.

Collins, David C.

188 Lloyd, H. T

Collins, E K..

346 Longworth, N.

Colman, Henry.

309 L. T. T...

Coli, R.'L..

53 Lyman, J. H..

Darrach, J.

317 Mc Donald, Alexander

Dent, John H.

191 M. G.

D. K. Y..

124 Miller. John B....

Doolittle, John..

34 Mills, Wm. Wickham..

Downing, A. J.

248 Miner, T. B...

Edwards, Henry W.

237 Moit, T. S. W.........

F. L.....

..257, 289 Murdock, Win,..

E. M. C.......

.266, 380 Muspratt, James.

E. S...

.33, 98, 197, 194 M. W. P...

Farmer, A Young.

126 N.....

Farmer, an Old Pennsylvanian.

283 Norton, John P
Father, A....

67 | Oddie, Wm. B.

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Old Lady, An.

.65, 97, 161, 353 Churn, Cylindrical...

Parsons, . B..

.9, 27, 117 Copper Button, Blithewood..
Partridge, Wm.

Corn-Planter ..

Peacocke, James S..

...273 Corn-Sheller, Burrall's..

Persicus...

81 Cottage, Plan of, 8. Robinson's.

Peters, T.C..

Cotton Gin, Eagle..

Philips, M. W.

.84, 143, 183, 210, 285, 319, 339 Crib-Biter....

Phillips, Philetus

G0, 86 Cultivator.

Prince, Wm. R..

.32, 91, 371 Dogs, Drovers..

Q. E. D.......

160 Drill Cultivator..

Quirk...

32 Drill Marker...

Randle, Geo. H..

53 Entrance Gate to Villa..

Resident, A Summer, of East Jersey

315 Farm-Houses, Downing's..
Reviewer...

..159, 179, 219, 343, 374 Fence, Stevens'.
RH..

95 Fountain, Poultry-Feeding.
R. L. A,

114 | Fowl, Rumpless.

R. L. C..

193 Fowl, Silky..

Robinson, Solon

-56, 57, 83, 90, 211, 282 Gate, Balance, Hood's..

.23, 241 Gate, Lodge, Donaldson's.
Ruff, J. A. & Co...

350 Gardener, House of Donaldson's..
Sawyer, Nath.

149 | Glove, Garden...

Schermerhorn, Wm. H.

2 Grindstone, with Friction Rollers...

Scripture, E. S

113 Hammer, Anderson's.

S. H.R..

66 Halier Ring..
Solus.

162 Hay-Press, Economical...

Spalding, Thomas....

54 Hay-Rake, Revolving.

Stickney, Wm.....

187 Hydraulic Ram..
Stone, Andrew.

..18, 155 Indigo Vats...
Subscriber, A...

111, 151, 252 | Lactometer, Scotch.

S. Y....

.87, 181 Locust-Tree Borer..

T..

93, 144, 147, 151, 154, 163 Machine, Grain, and Seed Planter..

Talbot, L. T .......58, 122, 145, 176, 209, 246, 287, 310, 339, 372 Machine, Seed Sowing...
Terrell, Wm..

279 Machine for Clearing Gravel Walks..

T. H. N.

15 Merino Buck....

Tomkins, Calvin & Co...

24 Merino Ewe..

Traveller, A..

.120, 277, 346 Pigsties, Plan of.

Traveller, an Old.

209 Plow, Coulter....

Vail, George..

283 | Plow, Cutter....

.227, 290 Plow, Eagle.
Waite, Henry M.

184 Plow, Lock Coulter ........
Walthamstow..

288 Plow, Paring.
Watson, Henry.

92 Plow, Side-Hill............

W.D...

21 Potato Washer..

Western...

218 Poultry-House, View of...

Winthrop, Jas.

22 Rake, Revolving...

213 Rain, Hydraulic.

Ring Halter...................

Sausage Stuffer..

Seed and Grain Planter..

ILLUSTRATIONS.

Seed-Sowing Machine..

Sheep Saxon..

Alpacas...

216, 217 Stall for a Biter..

Apple-Moth..

65 Stall for a Kicker..

Apple-Tree Borer...

98 Strawberry, British Queen...

Balance-Gate, Hood's..

126 Strawberry, Deptford Pine.

Barn, Massachusetts.

120 Strawberry, Flowers of....

Barn, Southern..

81 Strawberry, Prince Albert...

Bee-Feeder........

60 Strawberry, Princess Alice Maude.

Boxer and Rose...

280 Strawberry, Sexes of.......

Bridge, Ravine, Blithewood.

89 trawberry, Swainstone

..

Carriage Wheel, Scripture's.

113 Tench...

Cattle Handler...

24 Water Ram..

Carp.....

281 / Wheelbarrow, Ladies'

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Agriculture is the most healthful, the most useful, and the most noble employment of man. - WASHINGTON.
VOL. V.
NEW YORK, JANUARY, 1846.

NO. I. A. B. ALLEN, Editor.

SAXTON & Miles, Publishers, 205 Broadway. TO SUBSCRIBERS.

TO EXCHANGE PAPERS. WE send this number of our paper to all sub- Our exchanges will please do us the favor of scribers to the last volume, hoping that they may noticing the commencement of a new volume, with find it agreeable to renew their subscriptions, and its character and terms; and also, if convenient, continue with us another year. Such as do not copy these as they appear on the last page. We wish the Agriculturist continued, will please return shall be obliged if edítors and post-masters genethis number immediately, and unmutilated, with the rally, will act as agents, or get some responsible name and Post-office address on the wrapper (not person to do so. Our paper does not conflict at all on the paper), when it will be stopped. Recol with theirs, and by exerting their influence in our lect that the subscription is cash in advance, and we behalf, they may greatly subserve the best interests wish expressly that none be forwarded by Post- of the country, and assist in ameliorating the con. office drafts, it is so troublesome to collect them. dition of the farmer. By lightening his toil, and The money may, in all cases, be enclosed in a let-teaching him how to grow a larger product per ter, and sent direct to the publishers, at their risk. acre, with the same capital and labor bestowed, The terms remain unaltered. Single copies, One millions are added to the productive wealth of the Dollar; three copies for Two Dollars ; eight copies country, society is advanced, and comfort and hapfor Five Dollars. Agricultural Societies, Clubs, piness frequently produced, where none now exist. and agents, supplied on the most liberal terms. We trust that none will be found slack in their The work being stereotyped, back volumes, hand- efforts, and that renewed exertions will be made somely and uniformly bound, can at all times be by the friends of agriculture to carry this journal to had. These now form one of the best Encyclo- every farmer's door in the land. pædias on American agriculture to be found, and ought to be in every library. No money can be

TO THE LEGISLATURE. better spent than in devoting it to the purchase of At the last session of the Legislature, a bill was this excellent work. The farmer who does not introduced and attempted to be passed in the House, possess it is without his best friend. Many refuse directing every County Superintendent of Common to take an agricultural paper on the ground that Schools in the State, to subscribe for as many they cannot afford it, when, at the same time, they copies of the Albany Cultivator as there were annually spend dollars in the most useless or School Districts in their counties—the subscription worthless things imaginable. We have often heard and postage to be paid by the State, out of the it said, that a single article in our paper has saved School fund. This bill would have given upwards the reader five or ten times its subscription price of $12,000 to a single agricultural paper! at the How beneficial, then, must it be in the aggregate to same time that there were FOUR others in the the farmers of the country! England and other State equally meritorious equally valuable to the foreign countries are making rapid strides in the farming community-and equally deserving publi, arts of the husbandman, and they owe the advan- patronage. We are of opinion that the Legislature tages of their progress mainly to their agricultural could not pass a wiser and more beneficial act thaj periodicals

such as should disseminate agricultural journa.

10

THE ALPACA.--CISTERNS. CLEARING SWAMPS AND MARSHES.

among the Common Schools of the State ; but we ready a company is on the tapis to bring over ten
hope if anything of the kind is attempted at the thousand of those animals for the national good.
present Session, for ONE particular journal, it may As the race is nearly extinct in Peru, it is desirable
meet with the marked rebuff of last year. We are to bring them to our isles; their wool approaching
opposed to exclusive privileges—they are contrary silk, and their flesh being improved by English air
to the genius of our Republic. We advocate the and pasture. Our Sovereign and Prince Albert are
principle that all who are deserving shall share now wearing royal robes manufactured from the
equally the bounty of the State; and we trust that wool of these animals, bred in the Royal Park, at
this principle will be kept in view by the highly in- Windsor. In ten years these animals will add £20,-
telligent and honorable body composing the Legis- 000,000 per annum to the national wealth.
lature this Session.

CISTERNS.
THE ALPACA. I

Many farmers might conveniently, and with We wish we possessed one-tenth the wealth of great advantage, furnish themselves economically many a man we could name in this country, for one with an extensive and permanent supply of water, of the first things we would do with a very small por- when otherwise deficient, by constructing cisterns. tion of it, would be to import a few Alpacas, and Where they have compact clay land, no further naturalize them here for the benefit of the agricul- preparation is necessary for ordinary use for stock, tural community. We wrote a little article on this than to excavate to a sufficient size; and to keep up subject in our April number, last year, and we in- the banks on every side, place two frames of single tend to continue inserting others till we can influ- joice around it near the top and bottom, between ence some one, who has sufficient patriotism, to which and the banks, heavy boards or plank may make an importation of these most beautiful and be set in an upright position, reaching from top 10 valuable animals. It pains us, absolutely, to look bottom. The earth keeps them in place on one around and see the worthless objects on which so side, and the joice prevents them falling in. They much money is spent in every quarter of the United require to be only tight enough to prevent the clay States; and yet one might solicit for years, and it from washing in. No appreciable quantity of wais doubtful whether so small a sum as one thousand ter wili escape from the sides or bottom. We have dollars could be raised for the worthy purpose of had such an one for years without repairs or any importing what might ultimately benefit the country material wasting of water. This should be made untold millions. This does not arise from a want near the buildings; and the rains, carefully conof liberality on the part of our citizens, but unfor- ducted by the eaves-troughs and pipes from an extunately from improper education. Yes; we mean tensive range, will afford an ample supply. For education in its enlarged sense—an education which household purposes, one should be made with more teaches people to do with their abundant means care and expense, and so constructed as to afford what is for the advantage of their fellow citizens pure filtered water at all times. These may be aye, and for the world, instead of spending them formed in various ways, and of different materials, so exclusively for the gratification of their own im- stone, brick, or even wood; though the two former inediate vaniiy, pride, and luxury. Is there not a are preferable. They should be permanently merchant among the millionaires of this great city, divided into two apartments, one to receive the who will stand up as Mr. W. Dawson didhon- water, and another to be used as a reservoir to conored be his name at the late meeting of the British tain such as is ready for use. Alternate layers of Association for the advancement of science, and say: gravel, sand, and charcoal at the bottom of the first,

“It is now six years since I first joined this society and sand and gravel in the last, are sufficient; the for a little recreation or relaxation from the trials of water being allowed to escape from the bottom of 30 years close application to commercial life; and the former into the latter, through the several layers at Birmingham I brought a subject before its notice, mentioned, will be rendered perfectly free from all which received its countenance in a special manner. impurities, and furnishes the purest water in the I there declared the object of that paper, which was world. Some who are particularly choice in preto induce our various manufacturers to exercise paring their water, make use of filtering stones, but their ingenuity in discovering means to consume a this is not essential to securing a choice article. wool of a silken texture (as can be seen retailing) Occasional cleaning may be necessary, and the in a manufactured state, and also to prepare our substitution of new materials will at all times landed gentry and farmers to naturalize the animal keep them sweet. called the “ Alpaca”-a species of sheep that eat what the cow, the horse, the common sheep, &c., CLEARING SWAMPS AND MARSHES.—The winter reject. The manufactures have succeeded beyond is decidedly the best time to clear the brush and my most sanguine expectation, and the naturaliza. timber from the swamps and marshes, in order to tion also : the former has created a national wealth | let the sun in to dry up the water, and prepare the of £3,000,000 to £5,000,000 per annum; the latter way for ditching, much of which may also be done is progressing rapidly; I have proved these moun- now to advantage. Labor is cheap and plenty at tain-rangers can be domiciled in our own country, this season of the year, and it is the duty of every though brought from beyond the Andes Mountains one, who is able, to give employment to the needy, in Peru. (How much more easily then would they and get rid of those unsightly rookeries which are do this in the United States—a climate similar to of no other use than to harbor the blackbirds that their own!] I have tried the experiment in my pull up the corn. These swamps are usually the own lands, on the west coast of Ireland, in the richest land on the farm, and will pay the greatest wildest districts of the county of Kerry; and al-'interest of any when drained and croppeu.

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