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1790, the number of academies was 3; in 1791, it was 5; in 1792, it was ?; and in 1793 and 1794 it was 10 at the date of reports, but some of these had but just been incorporated, and no statement of attendance was given.

The report of 1795 was much more extended than those of previous years,

and had it been sustained in this manner, we might date from this period the beginning of very satisfactory returns. The statement of attendance was however fragmentary and defective for some years after, but enables us to present the following tables, in which the years are those to which the reports refer, and preceding those in which the reports to the Legislature were made.

Several changes have been made in the headings of the classifica tion of attendance, which will render it proper to divide the whole series into periods, having common resemblance, as follows:

(I) Period during which the Apportionment was based upun

the Total number attending.

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* Probably the number attending during the year. The other returns are generally those of students attending in the term in which the report is made, but of this there is uncertainty.

(II) Period during which the Apportionment was made upon the

number of Students pursuing Classical or Higher English Studies throughout the State.

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(III.) Period during which the Apportionment was made upon

the number of students pursuing Classical or Higher English Studies by Senatorial Districts.

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(IV.) Period during which the Apportionment was made upon

the number of Students pursuing Classical or Higher English Studies throughout the State, as shown by the Reports made by Trustees of Academies.

1846. 1817 1518. 1849 1850 1851... 1852 1853..... 1854.

1,405
14,232
15, 115
16,553
17,933
19,638
20.977
22,675
22, 824
18,318
21,384
22,028
20,812
21, 301
22,567
23, 111
21,834
22, 179
23, 035
21.998
14,992
11,96
9, 9:56
9,135
8,145

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(V.) Attendance at academies since the adoption of the Regent's

Preliminary Examinations in writing, as prescribed by the Regents.

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1R27 1428 1829 1830), 1831 1832. 1833. 1834 1835. 1836 1x37 1838. 1839. 1810.. 1811 1842. 1813. 1511 1815... 1916. 1817. 1918. 1919 184). 1801.. 1852 1833 1831.. 135

571

1857
1859...
1839..
1860).....
1861.
1862...
1863...
1864.
1865.
1866.
1807.
1668.....
1869.
1870..
1871...
1872...
1873...
1874
1875.
1876.
1477.
1875.
1879.
IRO.
1881.
1982
1893....

182 479 481 521 518 516 512 019 479 501 471 450 437 443 461 462 459 495 501 499 484 464 480

63 63 69 73 105 118 127 131 141 119 116 153 153 156 153 1.50 165 167 169

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1,049
1,019
1, 116
1,128
1,121
1, ON
1,051
1.
1,061
1.140
1,183
1,038
1, 151
1,153
1, 116
1,078
1.041
1,057
1, 102
1,188
1,315
1,325

649 620 610 631 593 618 679 721 609 656 651 017 594 577 577 538 638 769 789

189 194 200 226 202 206 223 207 265 273 273 260 253

576 533 569 610 614 659 667 095 739 775 825

951 914 237

916

536
536

1.116 1.313 1,150

172 163 176

6.96 850

COLLEGES OR OTHER INSTITUTIONS AT WHICH THE PRINCIPALS OF NEW

YORK ACADEMIES WERE EDUCATED. The Regent's Report of 1863 (referring to 1862), introduced a statement of the Colleges or other institutions at which the Principals of Academies were educated, and this has been continued down to the present time. A summary of these returns for the whole period would have interest if they could be made complete ; but from the large number of names returned without mentioning the place of graduation, in former years, we have deemed it sufficient to present a summary for the last five years ; still incomplete but instructive so

far as it goes.

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METHODS OF TEACUING. In 1817, Jonathan Ware, of Albany, addressed a memorial to the Senate, relating to an improved mode of teaching the languages, which was referred to the Regents for examination. Their comniittee, after making inquiries, and observing the result in different examinations in French classes, reported, that in their opinion, “the systein of teaching practiced by liim is superior to the ordinary course pursued in the generality of schools in this State. The method adopted by Mr. Ware resembles that of Dufief: it consists in teaching the proper names of things, and short familiar sentences in the first instances, and leaves grammatical instruction until the pupil is proficient in the art of speaking and understanding the language. This is the natural course, and its advantages are illustrated by the examinations referred to."

They had however no pecuniary patronage to bestow for rewarding individuals for discovering new and successful modes of instruction, however meritorions, and therefore simply reported as above.

Upon the 11th of April 1817, the Senate committee reported to the effect, that it appeared that Mr. Ware's method was a new and valuable improvement in the education of youth, and they recominended him as deserving of encouragement and patronage.'

About the year 1834, as the question of instruction of common School Teachers by Academies came up for discussion, we find Regent's Reports beginning to embrace articles and extracts from returns made by academies, in which " Methods of Teaching " form an important part. This information does not admit of condensation or classification, and our limits do not allow of its admission in these pages. But to the student of educational history we would commend the Regents’ Reports for many years following the date above mentioned, as well worthy of his careful examination, and feel confident in assuring him that he will be well rewarded by the study.

Average Attendance in the several Terms of the Year.

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Students pursuing Classical Studies, preparing for College, and

entering College.

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1,659
1,28
1,772
1,775
1,883

6,525
6,511
7,219

1879...
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TRRI..
1R 2.
1283.

1.725 1.88 2,168 2,113 2,32

173
176
1877
187

395
30
307

6,133

7,096

I Senate Journal, 1817, p. 324.

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