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DELIVERED DURING THE YEARLY MEETING OF FRIENDS, IN THE CITY

OF NEW YORK, JUNE, 1826:

TOGETHER WITH

A SERMON BY ELIZABETH ROBSON,

AND A PRAYER,

BY ANNA BRAITHWAITE:

ALSO,

SERMONS

DELIVERED IN PHILADELPHIA, AND WILMINGTON, (DEL.)

BY

THOMAS WETHERALD,

ON HIS WAY TO, AND FROM THE IEARLY MEETING.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND, BY MARCUS T. C. GOULD,

Stenographer.

Philadelphia:
PUBLISHED BY THE REPORTER.

c 8348.768.15

HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY

GIFT OF FRIENDS MOTORICAL LIBRARY SI KATIWORE COLLEGE

JAN 16 1935

E

REPORTER'S NOTE.

That the motives and circumstances attending the production of this volume, may be rightly understood and duly appreciated, the reporter considers a brief explanation both necessary and proper. This necessity is the more obvious, to persons acquainted with the unpleasant excitement now existing in the Society of Friends, and with the fact, that the present reporter is identified with various other productions, emanating from a similar source, for which he has received censure which he deems unjust and unwarranted. He, therefore, takes the liberty to state, that, for any fault of which he may be adjudged guilty, in discharge of the duties above alluded to, he holds himself personally responsible; and only asks to be released from the imputation of partiality, in his selections for publication, other than that suggested by the probability of pecuniary emolument, in the sale of his reports.

The reporter wishes it understood, that the want of patronage alone, prevents the publication of discourses, which would probably be more satisfactory to the disaffected; but which, from the limited sale of some already published, must be delayed, till the merit of their authors and the liberality of their admirers, shall be found equal to the expense of publication. With the exception of one volume by Elias Hicks, the reporter has always acted for himself, without the control of friends or enemies; and has endeavoured to

discharge, in that and all other cases, the duties of his profession with integrity and honour.

As the principal part of this work is the production of one man, it may be satisfactory to some, who have not read his former discourses, to learn his views on the propriety of such publications; and, at the same time, to gather from his own words, the probability of accuracy and integrity on the part of the stenographer. For this purpose, it is thought proper to introduce the subjoined communications, since the publication of which, a volume by the same speaker has been published, without his inspection or revision. Having, then, already presented the public with three editions from the same speaker, without any other objection than that contained in his very appropriate and modest reply to the request of a stranger, the reporter submits most of the volume, with perfect confidence in the continued liberality of its author.

To other individuals, who will occupy a portion of this work, the reporter wouid remark: that, having learned from good authority, the improbability of their revising his manuscript if submitted for that purpose, he must therefore commit it to the press, with the same fidelity, that has hitherto received the approbation of other speakers, under similar circumstances-claiming their indulgence for unavoidable inaccuracies, should any be discovered in the publication.

It was the original intention, that this volume should contain the sermons of Thomas Wetherald and Elias Hicks only, but by special request, it is made to con

tain a sermon by Elizabeth Robson, and a prayer by Anna Braithwaite, in addition to the former design; which addition it is hoped will be satisfactory, as it appears necessary to the right understanding of the discourses which immediately followed, and to the more clear elucidation of certain facts, which are considered an important link in the chain of this report.

Letter from M. T. C. Gould, to Thomas Wetherald.

WasuingTON City, MARCH 29th, 1825. FRIEND WETHERALD-I send you, herewith, a manuscript copy of two discourses lately delivered by you, at the Friends' meeting, in this city. Will you have the goodness to correct such errors, as you may discover in the same? I am aware of the delicate situation in which a public speaker may be placed, by the unexpected publication of his extemporaneous discourses; and I consider it my duty, to make some apology for the liberty which I have taken. Your discourses were recorded by me, in short hand, for my own edification, and the gratification of my stenographic pupils in this place; but having been warmly solicited to give them publicity, and believing that they may be useful to many who were not present, and who may never have an opportunity to hear you, personally, I hope you will consent to their publication: and, notwithstanding, I conceive that language, thus delivered, is the common property of all who hear it; and that it is not for the speaker to determine, whether it shall be remembered or forgotten, treasured in the head or pocket, or republished by the tongue or the press, still, as far as I am concerned, I shall pay great deference to the individual whose language I may rescue, in its rapid flight to the ocean of oblivion ; and if, through the medium of my humble art, aided by the press, its benign influence shall be felt beyond the confined limits by which it was otherwise circumscribed, I hope I shall have done no injury, by the exercise of la. bour, on which myself and family are dependent for sup

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