A Digest of International Law: As Embodied in Diplomatic Discussions, Treaties and Other International Agreements, International Awards, the Decisions of Municipal Courts, and the Writings of Jurists ...

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1906

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Netherlands 865
20
ALIENS
25
Nature and functions 492
41
Rights and duties
60
CHAPTER III
67
Recognition of belligerencyContinued
69
Acts of insurgents
73
Acts and implications
77
3 Chile 297
92
Prosecution
101
Ottoman Porte
110
Conquest 1156
128
Spain 46
133
4 Dismissal 640
149
Venezuela 52
152
Chile 56
163
Prisoners of
166
Vessels
174
Rights and duties of ministers
182
Extraterritorial crime
200
Of belligerency 74
205
Treatment of the wounded 1134
207
Involuntary entrance as ground of exemption
208
Claim of impressment
216
International cooperation
228
Penalty 1263
231
Laws of various countries
242
Recognition by whom determinable 75
245
CHAPTER IV
255
Continuity
264
NATIONALITY
273
Coast warfare
279
France
281
Real estate protocol 1874 868
286
International American conferences 969
292
Jurisprudence
294
Judicial decisions
295
Effects of change of sovereignty
303
Declaration of intention insufficient 980
304
To whom issued
309
Nationality of vessels
321
Fourteen Diamond Rings
329
Report by Mr Dainese 1852
333
ClaytonBulwer treaty
351
Sources of nationality
372
Grounds of intervention
376
Peace negotiations with Spain
390
Naturalization not retroactive
401
China
406
Nationality of married women
408
Treaty relations 821
422
Question of expatriation
431
Privateers
441
Annexation of Texas
446
Care of indigent citizens
486
Cutting of cables 1176
502
Applications
503
Germany 823
514
Foreign residence of naturalized citizens
517
Duration of passports
523
Disabilities
541
Military service
548
Guano Islands
555
Conditions of validity
558
Breach of blockade
574
Extradition a national act
579
Treaties
589
H Doc 551 III
593
Political offenses
604
Exchange of ratifications
609
CHAPTER V
612
Convention of 1818 164Continued
613
Habeas corpus
614
Expenses
620
Cases of Enterprise and Hermosa
622
Egress 1277
639
INTEROCEANIC COMMUNICATIONS
652
Straits
658
Jurisdictional immunities
660
Danish Sound dues
664
Police regulations
669
Ceremonial
681
Limited 1102
692
Classes and titles
696
Marginal
700
Freedom of the seas
708
Powers and duties
717
Shipping and seamen
725
2 Provisions for individual election 380
730
Salary and fees
732
Declarations of maritime
733
Negotiation and conclusion
739
Agreements not submitted to the Senate
752
1 Province of the courts
760
IV Northeastern Fisheries
767
Termination
770
Nonpecuniary redress
775
Treaty of 17823 163
778
Argentine Republic 781
781
AustriaHungary
782
Barbary powers 1 Early relations
783
Algiers 784
784
Morocco
785
Tripoli
786
Tunis
787
Belgium 788
788
Bolivia
789
Treaties of 1858
798
Treaty of 1868
799
Immigration and other treaties 18801894
800
Taxes
801
Industries
802
Travel
803
Missionary privileges and protection
804
Purchase of land
805
Treaty ports and foreign settlements
806
Leases to European powers
807
Boxer movement 1 Siege and relief of legations 80s 2 Negotiations for settlement
809
Practice of protection
810
Open door policy 1 The Hay agreement
811
2 AngloGerman agreement
812
Territorial integrity neutrality
813
Colombia
814
Congo
815
Corea
816
Denmark
817
Dominican Republic 818
818
Ecuador 819
819
1 Negotiations
824
2 Effect of stipulations 825
825
Jay treaty 1794
826
2 Particular stipulations 827
827
MonroePinkney and cognate negotiations
828
Treaty of Ghent 829
829
Treaty of 1815
830
Naval forces on Great Lakes 1817
831
Fisheries convention 1818
832
Indemnity for slaves 1822
833
WebsterAshburton treaty
834
Oregon treaty
835
ClaytonBulwer treaty
836
Reciprocity treaty of 1854
837
Treaty of Washington 1871
839
Canadian relations
840
The Queens jubilee
841
American naturalization
842
Hayti
843
Italy
844
Japan 1 Early attempts to negotiate
845
Perrys successful mission
846
Harris treaties and Japanese embassy
847
Domestic disturbances
848
Affair of Shimonoseki
849
Convention of 1866 and treaty revision
850
Emancipation of Japan
851
Liberia 1 Declarations of American policy
852
Treaty of 1862 Art VIII
853
Relations with Great Britain
854
Relations with France
855
Madagascar
856
Mexico 1 Relations 18251848
857
Treaty of GuadalupeHidalgo
858
Mesilla and later treaties
859
Domestic disturbances intervention
860
Later relations
861
Zona Libra or Free Zone
862
Crossing of border by cattle
863
H Doc 551 v
865
Extradition treaty
869
Educational eleemosynary and religious institutions
870
Schools
871
Sale of books
872
Freedom of worship
873
Armenian difficulties
874
Various topics
875
Paraguay
876
Persia
877
Peru
878
Portugal
879
Russia
880
Samoan Islands
881
Siam
882
Treaty of October 27 1795
883
Treaty of February 22 1819
884
Convention of February 17 1834
885
Reciprocity agreement 1891
886
Treaty of December 10 1898
887
Caroline Islands
888
Sweden and Norway
889
Switzerland
890
Tahiti
891
Tonga
892
Uruguay
893
Venezuela
894
Zanzibar
895
Multipartite treaties
896
Political intervention 1 General principles
897
Policy of nonintervention 1 Declarations of policy
898
2 The French revolution
899
3 Spain and her colonies
900
4 Greek independence
901
5 Hungarian revolution
902
6 ChilePeruvian war
903
7 Sympathy with liberal political struggles
904
8 Hospitality to political refugees
905
Questions of asyium
916
1 By contract 918
918
Evidence
919
Early expressions of American policy
927
2 Regulation of procedure 187
930
Monroes message December 2 1823
936
Definitions
938
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Էջ 582 - Article. XI. Canada acceding to this Confederation, and joining in the measures of the United States, shall be admitted into and entitled to all the advantages of this union; but no other colony shall be admitted into the same, unless such admission be agreed to by nine States/
Էջ 624 - The navigation of the river Mississippi, from its source to the ocean, shall forever remain free and open to the subjects of Great Britain and the citizens of the United States." In 1790 the diplomatic representative of the United States at Madrid was instructed to urge upon the Spanish Government the immediate opening of the river.
Էջ 621 - navigable in fact when they are used, or are susceptible of being used, in their ordinary condition, as highways for commerce, over which trade and travel are or may be conducted in the customary modes of travel on water." And again (p. 442) : " It is not. however, as Chief Justice Shaw said, '21
Էջ 528 - II. Spain will cede to the United States the island of Porto Rico and other islands now under Spanish sovereignty in the West Indies, and also an island in the Ladrones to be selected by the United States. ARTICLE III. The United States will occupy and hold the city, bay and
Էջ 31 - denominated domestic dependent nations. They occupy a territory to which we assert a title independent of their will, which must take effect in point of possession when their right of possession ceases. Meanwhile they are in a state of pupilage. * * * They and their country are considered by foreign nations, as well as by ourselves, as
Էջ 35 - The rights of the original inhabitants were in no instance entirely disregarded, but were necessarily, to a considerable extent, impaired. They were admitted to be the rightful occupants of the soil, with a legal as well as just claim to retain possession of it, and to use it according to their own discretion; but,
Էջ 289 - The Government of Spain hereby relinquishes all claim of sovereignty over and title to Cuba. "The Government of Spain hereby cedes to the United States the Island of Porto Rico and other islands now under Spanish sovereignty in the West Indies, and also the Island of Guam, in the
Էջ 784 - to take fish on the coast of Newfoundland and on the coasts, bays, and creeks of all other of His Britannic Majesty's dominions in America, and also the " liberty " to dry and cure fish, subject to the conditions stated in the article. When the plenipotentiaries of the United
Էջ 418 - and felt by the whole civilized world would be outraged if private property should be generally confiscated, and private rights annulled. The people change their allegiance; their relation to their ancient sovereign is dissolved: but their relations to each other, and their rights of property remain undisturbed. "This
Էջ 783 - the following article was agreed on: "ARTICLE "III. It is agreed that the people of the United States shall continue to enjoy unmolested the right to take fish of every kind on the Grand Bank, and on all the other banks of Newfoundland; also in the Gulph of St. Lawrence, and at all other places in the sea, where the inhabitants of

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