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Indians may ments shall make it improper, the Cherokee hunters shall be at liberty hunt on lands

to hunt and take game upon the lands relinquished and ceded by this relinquished. treaty.

ARTICLE VIII. Notice of time Due notice shall be given to the principal towns of the Cherokees, for delivering of the time proposed for delivering the annual stipends; and sufficient annuities, &c.

supplies of provisions shall be furnished, by and at the expense of the United States, to subsist such reasonable number that may be sent, or shall attend to receive them during a reasonable time.

ARTICLE IX. Horses stolen

It is mutually agreed between the parties, that horses stolen and not to be paid for. returned within ninety days, shall be paid for at the rate of sixty dollars

each; if stolen by a white man, citizen of the United States, the Indian proprietor shall be paid in cash; and if stolen by an Indian from a citizen, to be deducted as expressed in the fourth article of the treaty of Philadelphia.—This article shall have retrospect to the commencement of

the first conferences at this place in the present year, and no further. Oblivion of

And all animosities, aggressions, thefts and plunderings, prior to that past aggres- day shall cease, and be no longer remembered or demanded on either sions. side.

ARTICLE X. The Cherokee

The Cherokee nation agree, that the agent who shall be appointed to agent to have a reside among them from time to time, shall have a sufficient piece of piece of ground. ground allotted for his temporary use.

And lastly, This treaty, and the several articles it contains, shall be considered as additional to, and forming a part of, treaties already subsisting between the United States and the Cherokee nation, and shall ! be carried into effect on both sides, with all good faith as soon as the same shall be approved and ratified by the President of the United States, and the Senate thereof. IN WITNESS of all and every thing herein determined between the

United States of America, and the whole Cherokee nation, the parties hereunto set their hands and seals, in the Council-House, near Tellico, on Cherokee ground, and within the United States, this second day of October, in the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety-eight, and in the twenty-third year of the Independence and Sovereignty of the United States.

THOS. BUTLER,

GEO. WALTON.
Ne-ne-tu-ah, or Bloody Fellow,

Kettegiskie
Ostaiah,

Tauquotihee, or the Glass
Jaunne, or John,

Chuquilatague
Oortlokecteh,

Salleekookoo-olah
Chokonnistaller, or Stallion,

Tallo luskee
Nool-hoietah,

Chellokee
Kunnateetah, or Rising Fawn,

Tuskeegatee, or Long Fellow
Utturah, or Skin Worm,

Neeka-anneah, or Woman Holder
Wee-lee, or Will,

Kulsateehee
Oolasoteh,

Keetakeuskah, or Prince
Tlorene,

Charley
Jonnurteekee, or Little John,

Akooh
Oonatakoteehee,

Sawanookeh
Kanowsurkee, or Broom,

Yonah Equah, or Big Bear
Yonah Oolah, Bear at Home,

Keenabkunnah
Tunksalenee, or Thick Legs,

Ka-wee-soola-skee
Oorkullaukee

Teekakalohenah
Kumamah, or Butterfly

Ookousetech, or John Taylor
Chattakuteehee

Chochu Chee
Kanitta, or Little Turkey

WITNESSES :-Elisha I. Hall, Sec. of the Commission. Silas Dinsmoor, I. agent to the Cherokees. John W. Hooker, U. S. Factor. Edw. Butler, Capt. commanding at Tellico. Robt. Purdy, Lieut. 4th U. S. Regt. Ludwell Grymes. Jno. M.Donald. Daniel Ross. Mattw. Wallace, Esquire. Saml. Hanly. Michael M.Kinsey. Chs. Hicks, interpreter. James Cazey, interpreter. John Thompson.

To the Indian names aro subjoined a mark and seal.

A TREATY,

Of reciprocal advantages and mutual convenience between the Oct. 24, 1801. United States of America and the Chickasaus.

Proclamation,

May 4, 1802. The President of the United States of America, by James Wilkinson Consent of brigadier general in the service of the United States, Benjamin Hawkins Senate; May of North Carolina, and Andrew Pickens of South Carolina, commissioners of the United States, who are vested with full powers, and the Mingco, principal men and warriors of the Chickasaw nation, representing the said nation, have agreed to the following articles.

.

Art. I. The Mingco, principal men and warriors of the Chickasaw Right to mako nation of Indians, give leave and permission to the President of the a road, &c.

granted to U.S. United States of America, to lay out, open and make a convenient waggon road through their land between the settlements of Mero District in the state of Tennessee, and those of Natchez in the Mississippi Territory, in such way and manner as he may

deem
proper;

and the same shall be a high way for the citizens of the United States, and the Chickasaws. The Chickasaws shall appoint two discreet men to serve as assistants, guides or pilots, during the time of laying out and opening the road, under the direction of the officer charged with that duty, who shall have a reasonable compensation for their service: Provided always, that the necessary ferries over the water courses crossed by the said road shall be held and deemed to be the property of the Chickasaw nation.

Art. II. The commissioners of the United States give to the Mingco Present of of the Chickasaws, and the deputation of that nation, goods to the value goods to Inof seven hundred dollars, to compensate him and them and their attend- dians. ants for the expense and inconvenience they may have sustained by their respectful and friendly attention to the President of the United States of America, and to the request made to them in his name to permit the opening of the road. And as the persons, towns, villages, lands, hunting grounds, and other rights and property of the Chickasaws, as set forth in the treaties or stipulations heretofore entered into between the contracting parties, more especially in and by a certificate of the President of the United States of America, under their seal of the first of July 1794, are in the peace and under the protection of the United States, the commissioners of the United States do hereby further agree, that the President of the United States of America, shall take such measures from time to time, as he may deem proper, to assist the Chickasaws to preserve entire all their rights against the encroachments of unjust neighbours, of which he shall be the judge, and also to preserve and perpetuate friendship and brotherhood between the white people and the Chickasaws. VOL VII. 9

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Treaty, when to take effeci.

Art. III. The commissioners of the United States may, if they deem it advisable, proceed immediately to carry the first article into operation; and the treaty shall take effect and be obligatory on the contracting parties, as soon as the same shall have been ratified by the President of the United States of America, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate of the United States. IN TESTIMONY whereof we, the plenipotentiaries, have hereunto sub

scribed our names and affixed our seals at Chickasaw Bluffs, the twenty-fourth of October, 1801.

JA. WILKINSON, Brig. Genl.,
BENJAMIN HAWKINS,
ANDW. PICKENS.

Chinmimbe Mingco,

William Glover,
Immuttauhaw,

Thomas Brown,
Chummaube,

William Colbert, W. C.
George Colbert,

Mooklushopoie,
William M.Gillivray,

Opoieolaubtau,
Opiehoomub,

Teschoolauhtau,
Olohtohopoie,

Teschoolauhtau,
Minkemattauhau,

James Underwood.
Tushkoopoie,
WITNESSES:—Samuel Mitchell, Agent to the Chickasaws. Malcom McGee, In-
terpreter to the Chickasaws. William R. Bootes, Capt. of 30 Reg. and aid-de-camp.
J. B. Walbach, Lieut. and aid-de-camp. J. Wilson, Lieut. 3d Regiment.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

A TREATY OF FRIENDSHIP, LIMITS AND ACCOMMO

DATION

Dec. 17, 1801. Between the United States of America and the Chactaw nation

of Indians.
Proclamation,
May 4, 1802.
Ratified April

Thomas Jefferson, President of the United States of America, by 30, 1802. James Wilkinson, of the state of Maryland, Brigadier-General in the

army of the United States, Benjamin Hawkins, of North Carolina, and Andrew Pickens, of South Carolina, commissioners plenipotentiary of the United States on the one part, and the Mingos, principal men and warriors of the Chactaw nation, representing the said nation in council assembled, on the other part, have entered into the following articles

and conditions, viz. Peace and

Art. I. Whereas the United States in Congress assembled, did by friendship. their commissioners Plenipotentiary, Benjamin Hawkins, Andrew Pick

ens, and Joseph Martin, at a treaty held with the chiefs and head men of the Chactaw nation at Hopewell, on the Keowe, the third day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-six, give peace to t je said nation, and receive it into the favor and protection of the United States of America; it is agreed by the parties to these presents respectively, that the Chactaw nation, or such part of it as may reside within the limits of the United States, shall be and continue under the care and protection of the said States; and that

a

the mutual confidence and friendship which are hereby acknowledged to subsist between the contracting parties shall be maintained and perpetuated.

Art. 11. The Mingos principal men and warriors of the Chactaw A wagon way nation of Indians, do hereby give their free consent, that a convenient to be made and durable waggon way may be explored, marked, opened and made

through Indian

lands. under the orders and instructions of the President of the United States, through their lands to commence at the northern extremity of the settlements of the Mississippi Territory, and to be extended from thence, by such route as may be selected and surveyed under the authority of the President of the United States, until it shall strike the lands claimed by the Chickasaw nation; and the same shall be and continue for ever, a high-way for the citizens of the United States and the Chactaws; and the said Chactaws shall nominate two discreet men from their nation, who may be employed as assistants, guides or pilots, during the time of laying out and opening the said high-way, or so long as may be deemed expedient, under the direction of the officer charged with this duty, who shall receive a reasonable compensation for their services.

Art. III. The two contracting parties covenant and agree that the Boundary. old line of demarkation heretofore established by and between the officers of his Britannic Majesty and the Chactaw nation, which runs in a parallel direction with the Mississippi river and eastward thereof, shall be retraced and plainly marked, in such way and manner as the President may direct, in the presence of two persons to be appointed by the said nation; and that the said line shall be the boundary between the settlements of the Mississippi Territory and the Chactaw nation. And the said nation does by these presents relinquish to the United States and quit claim for ever, all their right, title and pretension to the land lying between the said line and the Mississippi river, bounded south by the thirty-first degree of north latitude, and north by the Yazoo river, where the said line shall strike the same; and on the part of the commissioners it is agreed, that all persons who may be settled beyond this line, shall be removed within it, on the side towards the Mississippi, together with their slaves, household furniture, tools, materials and stock, and that the cabbins or houses erected by such persons shall be demolished.

Art. IV. The President of the United States may, at his discretion, Indians to be proceed to execute the second article of this treaty; and the third arti- notified of the cle shall be carried into effect as soon as may be convenient to the go- time, &c. of re

survey. vernment of the United States, and without unnecessary delay on the one part or the other, of which the President shall be the judge; the Chactaws to be seasonably advised, by order of the President of the United States, of the time when, and the place where, the re-survey and re-marking of the old line referred to in the preceding article, will be commenced.

Art. V. The commissioners of the United States, for and in consi- 82000 deliver deration of the foregoing concessions on the part of the Chactaw nation, ed to the Inand in full satisfaction for the same, do give and deliver to the Mingos,

dians, &c. chiefs and warriors of the said nation, at the signing of these presents, the value of two thousand dollars in goods and merchandise, nett cost of Philadelphia, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, and they further engage to give three sets of blacksmith's tools to the said nation.

Art. VI. This treaty shall take effect and be obligatory on the con- Treaty, when tracting parties, so soon as the same shall be ratified by the President to take effect.

of the United States of America, by and with the advice and consent
of the Senate thereof.
IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, the Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the

United States, and the Mingos, principal men and warriors of the
Chactaw nation, have hereto subscribed their names and asfixed
their seals, at Fort Adams, on the Mississippi, this seventeenth day
of December, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred
and one, and of the independence of the United States the twenty-
sixth.

JA. WILKINSON,
BENJAMIN HAWKINS,
ANDW. PICKENS.

Tuskona Hopoia,

Il,la talla, Homo,
Toota Homo,

Hoché Homo,
Mingo Homo Massatubby,

Tuspêna Chaabè,
Oak Chumme,

Muclusha Hopoia,
Mingo Poos,coos,

Cappulanne Thlucco,
Buckshun Nubby,

Robert M.Clure,
Shappa Homo,

Poosha Homo,
Hi,u,pa Homo,

Ba ka Lub,bè.
WITNESSES PRESENT:-Alexander Macomb, jun. secretary to the commission ;
John M.Kee, deputy superintendant and agent to the Chaclaws; Henry Gaither, lieu.
tenant colonel commandant; John H. Brull, major second regiment infantry; Bn.
Shaumburgh, captain second regiment infantry; Fran. Jones, assistant quarter mas.
ter general; Benjamin Wilkinson, lieutenant and paymaster third United States regi-
ment; J. B. Walbach, aid de camp to the commanding general; J. Wilson, lieutenant
third reginent infantry; Samuel Jeton, lieutenant second regiment of artillery and
engineers; John F. Carmichael, surgeon third regiment United States army.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

A TREATY OF LIMITS

June 16, 1802. Between the United States of America and the Creek Nation of Proclamation,

Indians. Jan. 11, 1803.

Thomas Jefferson, President of the United States of America, by James Wilkinson, of the state of Maryland, Brigadier General in the army of the United States, Benjamin Hawkins, of North-Carolina, and Andrew Pickens of South-Carolina, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States, on the one part, and the Kings, Chiefs, Head Men and Warriors of the Creek Nation, in council assembled, on the other

part, have entered into the following articles and conditions, viz. Cession of ter.

Article I. The Kings, Chiefs, Head men and Warriors of the Creek itory to U.S. nation, in behalf of the said nation, do by these presents cede to the

United States of America, all that tract and tracts of land, situate, lying and being within and between the following bounds, and the lines and limits of the extinguished claims of the said nation, heretofore ascertained and established by treaty. That is to say—beginning at the upper extremity of the high shoals of the Appalachee river, the same being a branch of the Oconee river, and on the southern bank of the same-running thence a direct course to a noted ford of the south branch of Little river, called by the Indians Chat-to-chuc-co hat-cheethence a direct line to the main branch of Commissioners' creek, where the same is intersected by the path leading from the rock-landing to the

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