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CHAPTER 56, AN ACT to change the name of Clara Elizabeth Dolph and George

Osman Dolph, to Clara Elizabeth Dolph Stiles and George
Osman Dolph Stiles

207
57.
to change the name of John William Hobbs

207
58.

defining the powers and duties of certain State Officers 208
fixing and regulating the fees of County Officers, Justices
of the Peace and Constables

218
60.

to provide for the appointment of Commissioners to lo-
cate a State Penitentiary, and to define their duties and
fix their compensation

228
61.
to provide for the State Printing

229
62.

relating to all Rail Road Companies whose Charters have
not been declared forfeited

237
63.

to change the name of the Leavenworth, Pawnee and
Western Railroad Company

238
64.

to provide for the removal of the Records and Papers of
the Courts of the late Territory of Kansas to the Courts
established by the Constitution

238
65.

to provide for the redemption of Real Estate sold under
Execution, Order of Sale, or other final Process

241
66.

to abolish the office of Register of Deeds of the City of
Lawrence

244
67.

to abolish the office of Register of Deeds of the City of
Eudora, and provide for disposing of the same

245
68.

to declare Madison Puett Register of Deeds for Anderson
County

245
69.
to provide Revenue for the year 1861

246
70.
to establish certain State Roads

246
71.

to declare the Road from Atchison to Clifton, on the Re-
publican Fork, a State Road

252
72.
to declare a certain Survey a State Road

252
73.
to establish a State Road from Paola to Moneka

253
74.

to extend the provisions of an act entitled "An Act de-
fining the mode of laying out and establishing Roads,"
to the county of Doniphan

254
75.

to establish the salaries of State Officers, Justices of the
Supreme Court, Judges of the District Court, and officers
of the Legislature

254

i
76.

for the regulation and support of Common Schools 256
77.
to promote Medical Science

274
78. JOINT RESOLUTION describing State Seal

275
79. AN ACT relating to Settlers upon Land without any legal right
thereto

276
80.

to authorize the formation of County and Town Agricul.
tural and Horticultural Societies

277
81.
to authorize the suspension of Specie Payment

279
82.

to provide for the protection of Stock from Contagious
Diseases

279

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CHAPTER 83. AN ACT to regulate the taking up and posting of Strays

281
84.

to provide for the postponement of the sale of Real and
personal property for Taxes

286
85.

to postpone the time for collection of certain Taxes in
Breckinridge County

287
86.

to legalize the assessment and collection of Taxes in and
for the city of Eudora, in Douglas county, for the year
1860

287
87.

to extend the time of paying Taxes in Leavenworth
county

288
to extend the time for the collection of Taxes in the
county of Lykins

288
89.

entitled "An Act providing for the Taxation of the Wy-
andott Indian Lands in Wyandott County"

289
90.

prescribing the duties and liabilities of the Treasurer of
State

290
91.

to prevent and punish Trespasses on School Lands 292
92.

to authorize the Governor to call into active service cer-
tain Troops, and to provide for the payment of the
expenses of the same

294
93.

to provide for filling vacancies in the Office of County
Assessor

295
94. JOINT RESOLUTION, declaring the office of Probate Judge, in
Johnson county, vacant

296
95. JOINT RESOLUTION declaring the office of County Superinten-

dent of Common Schools, in Johnson County, vacant 296
96. JOINT RESOLUTION declaring the office of County Clerk of At-
chison County, vacant

297
97. AN ACT providing for the protection of Widows and Minor
Children

297
98.
for the relief of Widows

298

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AUTHENTICATION.

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SECRETARY OF STATE'S OFFICE,

TOPEKA, KANSAS, Aug. 20, 1861. I hereby certify that the “Acts and Resolutions” furnished the Printer of this Volume of Laws, are truly copied from the original Enrolled Bills on file in my office.

JOHN W. ROBINSON, Secretary of the State of Kansas.

STATE JOURNAL OFFICE,

LAWRENCE, KANSAS, Aug. 22, 1861. We hereby certify that this volume is made up from the manuscript Acts and Resolutions furnished us by the Secretary of State—the proof sheets having been carefully compared with the same.

TRASK & LOWMAN,

Printers.

DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE.

IN CONGRESS, JULY 4, 1776. THE UNANIMOUS DECLARATION OF THE THIRTEEN UNITED

STATES OF AMERICA. WHEN, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume, among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the laws of nature and nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident :-That all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. That, to secure these rights, governments are instituted among nien, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed ; that, whenever any form of gove ernment becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute a new government, laying its foundation on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate, that governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shown, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves, by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object, evinces a design to reduce them under absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such government, and to provide new guards for their future security. Such has been the patient sufferance of these colonies, and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former systems of government. The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in

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direct object the establishment of an absolute tyranny over these States. To prove this, let facts be submitted to a candid world.

He bas refused his assent to laws the most wholesome and necessary for the public good.

He has forbidden his governers to pass laws of immediate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation, till his assent should be obtained; and, when so suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them. He has refused to pass other laws for the accommodation of large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the right of representation in the legislature--a right inestimable to them, and formidable to tyrants only.

He has called together legislative bodies, at places unusual, uncomfortable and distant from the repository of their public records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into a compliance with his measures.

He las dissolverl Representative Ilouses repeatedly, for opposing, with manly firmness, his invasions on the rights of the people.

He has refused, for a long time after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the legislative powers, incapable of annihilation, have returned to the people at large for their exercise, the State remaining, in the mean time, exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without and conyulsions within.

Ile has endeavored to prevent the population of these States; for that purpose obstructing the laws of naturalization of foreigners ; refusing to pass others to encourage their migration hither, and raising the conditions of new appropriations of lands.

IIe has obstructed the administration of justice, by refusing his assent to laws for establishing judiciary powers.

Ile has made judges dependent on his will alone, for the tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries.

Ile has erected a multitude of new offices, and sent hither swarms of officers, to harrass our people and eat out their substance.

He has kept among us, in times of peace, standing armies, without the consent of our legislatures.

He has affected to render the military independent of and superior to the

civil power.

He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our Constitution, aud unacknowledged by our laws; giving his assent to their acts of pretendel legislation :

For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us ;

For protecting them by a mock trial, from punishment for any murders which they should commit on the inhabitants of these States;

For cutting off our trade with all parts of the would;

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