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RICHARD COUR-DE-LION.

VOL. III.

MR. JAMES'S NEW ROMANCE.

Now Ready, in 3 vols. Post 8vo,
FOR E S T DA Y S.

A ROMANCE OF OLD TIMES.

By G. P. R. JAMES, Esq.,
Author of “ Morley Ernstein,” “The Robber,” &c.

“ Into this host of gallant things--this splendid pageantry of tilt and tournament—this association of knight and ladye--this concentration of all that charms and fascinates us in our retrospection of olden times, has Mr. James here carried us ... Scene after scene of vivid and vigorous interest succeeds each other; while village life is portrayed with such a May-day freshness, that we seem to linger over the sweet odour, almost unwilling to be lured away by even the pomp of chivalry or the grandeur of baronial castle.”—Metropolitan.

HISTORY OF THE LIFE

OF

RICHARD COEUR-DE-LION

KING OF ENGLAND.

BY G. P. R. JAMES, ESQ.

AUTHOR OF “ THE HISTORY OF CHARLEMAGNE,” “ LIFE OF EDWARD THE

BLACK PRINCE," “ LIFE OF LOUIS XIV.” ETC.

VOL. III.

LONDON

SAUNDERS AND OTLEY, CONDUIT STREET.

1843.

2266 a. 145.

MR. JAMES'S NEW ROMANCE.

Now Ready, in 3 vols. Post 8vo, F O R E S T DA Y S.

A ROMANCE OF OLD TIMES.

By G. P. R. JAMES, Esq., Author of “Morley Ernstein,” “The Robber,” &c.

“ Into this host of gallant things—this splendid pageantry of tilt and tournament—this association of knight and ladye-this concentration of all that charms and fascinates us in our retrospection of olden times, has Mr. James here carried us . . . Scene after scene of vivid and

succeeds each other; while village life is portrayed with such a May-day freshness, that we seem to linger over the sweet odour, almost unwilling to be lured away by even the pomp of chivalry or the grandeur of baronial castle."- Metropolitan.

[graphic]

HISTORY OF THE LIFE

OF

RICHARD CŒUR-DE-LION.

The battle of Antioch, though certainly one of the most important events of the crusade, did not produce such immediate benefits as might have been anticipated. The first question for the crusaders, after the magnitude of their victory was ascertained, became, whether the army of the cross should advance to Jerusalem at once, or should pause for a certain time to refresh the wearied and exhausted soldiery. Almost all the lower orders were eager to press forward, and it has been urged, not without reason, that had the march been commenced at once, so great was the panic caused amongst the infidels by the overthrow of Kerboga, all the cities on the road, as well as Jerusalem itself, would have thrown open their

VOL. III.

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