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Assurances,

no

we

on

French jurisdiction, Russia and mains for the country, our France—who are anti-cosmopo- manufacturers, chambers of litan—are attempting to block commerce,

financiers, adventhe way to any extension of the turers of all kinds, to see that general foreign settlement. On this policy is maintained, and this point it is satisfactory to to require that it shall be find that Lord Salisbury is strictly applied. Relying on both clear and firm. “No treaties will not help us against matter under what regula- people banded together to subtions,” he telegraphed on the vert them. 24th December,

cannot matter from what quarter, agree that any British property have been proved for the thoushould be given over to be ad- sandth time to be empty wind. ministered by the French;” and Whatever we have gained in he significantly adds, “In re China will be lost if we neglect fusing this demand we will to utilise and follow it up. support the Chinese materially.” Henceforth it must be clear to Later on he took strong objec- all that what we desire we must tion to any extension of the take with every form of cereFrench concession, the mony that does not bar the further ground that the pro- acquisition. We are not likely posal was at variance with the to copy the violence of other engagement given by the Chin- nations; but our interests are ese Government as to the non greater than theirs, and by all alienation of any territory lying proper means we must defend in the Yangtse region to an them. It is satisfactory to other Power. Her Majesty's observe that the commercial Government therefore absol- representatives of this country utely declined to consent to are becoming alive to the inthe arrangement, and to clench terests which they possess in the whole matter, Lord Salis- China. The Associated Chambury concludes with the very bers of Commerce, at their openshort sentence: “It will be welling meeting, gave forth no unto ask the Admiral to send an certain sound on this important other ship to Shanghai.” question. Mr Keswick, M.P.,

Thus, then, we have at last led off the proceedings with a got on to something like solid resolution expressing satisfacground, just enough for the sole tion with the action taken by of our foot, in China : we are the Government for the protecprepared, as in the old time, to tion of commercial interests in assert our rights and to defend China, and urging them to them. More than that the maintain vigorously the policy people of England have no

of the open door for commerce right to ask ; less than that throughout the Chinese empire, they will no longer tolerate. and the prior British rights in Such plain announcements urbi the Yangtse Valley and its et orbi will smooth the path watershed, and at all ports and of British policy in every settlements where British inpart of the world.

terests and business have been

It re

we

established and have predomin- during a dispute with Russia ated for many years.

about Kuldja in 1880; again, If further proof were needed during her war with France in that the commercial class have 1884, we distinctly warned the been strung up to a sensitive French off the Yangtse Valley, appreciation of their interest in and thus their coercive measures the Far East, it would be af- against China were limited to forded by the amendment to a naval patrol of the. coast. Mr Keswick's resolution, pro- Finally, during the war with posed by Mr Joseph Walton, Japan in 1894, Great Britain M.P. This was to omit the once more asserted her interest words “expressing satisfaction in that region, and intimated with the action taken by the to the invader her readiness to Government,” and it went on to defend the mouth of the river at point out in vigorous terms the all costs. Thus it is no political necessity of upholding our posi- doctrine extemporised for the tion. He denied that England occasion that we should claim could claim even to-day any the integrity of the Yangtse special sphere of influence even Valley, but a principle of policy in the Yangtse Valley, and that resting on a respectable his

were far from receiving torical basis. What remains is equal treatment with our rivals to give full practical effect to in China. So amended, the the claim, of which we trust resolution was passed unani- that Lord Salisbury's dictum mously by that most important about the French concession in and representative congress, Shanghai may be taken as an whose action no doubt will earnest. give a clue to that of all We may sum up the whole local associations throughout matter by insisting on the country.

active, well-considered realisaThe annual report of that tion of all our rights and very active body, the China claims, trusting to no paper Association, comes opportunely titles, no goodwill of any to give emphasis to, and fill Power, or group of Powers, up the gaps in, the with a decent regard to the spondence presented to Parlia- feelings of the Chinese Government. With regard to the ment so long as they are reasonYangtse region in particular, able, but without entering on the Association has done well exhausting controversies with to remind us that protection of that inanimate body, the that important zone of Central Tsungli-Yamên. For we must China is no new idea. It is remember that as yet there is there that our greatest com- only promise, but little in the mercial interests are consoli- way of achievement; and with dated, it is there that our poli- regard to the Yangtse Valley tical influence has been more 'tself, absolutely nothing has than anywhere in the ascendant been done to secure our position for many years.

We had ar

there excepting the declaration ranged to defend it for China of Lord Salisbury with regard

the

corre

to any

we

on

1

French jurisdiction, Russia and mains for the country, our France—who are anti-cosmopo- manufacturers, chambers of litan—are attempting to block commerce, financiers, adventhe

way extension of the turers of all kinds, to see that general foreign settlement. On this policy is maintained, and this point it is satisfactory to to require that it shall be find that Lord Salisbury is strictly applied. Relying on both clear and firm. “No treaties will not help us against matter under what regula- people banded together to subtions," he telegraphed on the vert them. Assurances, no 24th December,

cannot matter from what quarter, agree that any British property have been proved for the thoushould be given over to be ad- sandth time to be empty wind. ministered by the French;" and Whatever we have gained in he significantly adds, “In re China will be lost if we neglect fusing this demand we will to utilise and follow it

up. support the Chinese materially.” Henceforth it must be clear to Later on he took strong objec- all that what we desire we must tion to any extension of the take with every form of cereFrench concession, the mony that does not bar the further ground that the pro- acquisition. We are not likely posal was at variance with the to copy the violence of other engagement given by the Chin- nations; but our interests are ese Government as to the non greater than theirs, and by all alienation of any territory lying proper means we must defend in the Yangtse region to an them. It is satisfactory to other Power. Her Majesty's observe that the commercial Government therefore absol- representatives of this country utely declined to consent to are becoming alive to the inthe arrangement, and to clench terests which they possess in the whole matter, Lord Salis- China. The Associated Chambury concludes with the very bers of Commerce, at their openshort sentence: “It will be well ing meeting, gave forth no unto ask the Admiral to send an certain sound on this important other ship to Shanghai.” question. Mr Keswick, M.P.,

Thus, then, we have at last led off the proceedings with a got on to something like solid resolution expressing satisfacground, just enough for the sole tion with the action taken by of our foot, in China : we are the Government for the protecprepared, as in the old time, to tion of commercial interests in assert our rights and to defend China, and urging them to them. More than that the maintain vigorously the policy people of England have no of the open door for commerce right to ask; less than that throughout the Chinese empire, they will no longer tolerate. and the prior British rights in Such plain announcements urbi the Yangtse Valley, and its et orbi will smooth the path watershed, and at all ports and of British policy in every settlements where British inpart of the world.

terests and business have been

It re

we

established and have predomin- during a dispute with Russia ated for many years.

about Kuldja in 1880; again, If further proof were needed during her war with France in that the commercial class have 1884, we distinctly warned the been strung up to a sensitive French off the Yangtse Valley, appreciation of their interest in and thus their coercive measures the Far East, it would be af- against China were limited to forded by the amendment to a naval patrol of the coast. Mr Keswick’s resolution, pro- Finally, during the war with posed by Mr Joseph Walton, Japan in 1894, Great Britain M.P. This was to omit the once more asserted her interest words “expressing satisfaction in that region, and intimated with the action taken by the to the invader her readiness to Government,” and it went on to defend the mouth of the river at point out in vigorous terms the all costs. Thus it is no political necessity of upholding our posi- doctrine extemporised for the tion. He denied that England occasion that we should claim could claim even to-day any the integrity of the Yangtse special sphere of influence even Valley, but a principle of policy in the Yangtse Valley, and that resting on a respectable his

were far from receiving torical basis. What remains is equal treatment with our rivals to give full practical effect to in China. So amended, the the claim, of which we trust resolution was passed unani- that Lord Salisbury's dictum mously by that most important about the French concession in and representative congress, Shanghai may be taken as an whose action no doubt will earnest. give a clue to that of all We may sum up the whole local associations throughout matter by insisting on the the country.

active, well-considered realisa- () The annual report of that tion of all our rights and very active body, the China claims, trusting to no paper Association, comes opportunely titles, no goodwill of any to give emphasis to, and fill Power, or group of Powers, up the gaps in, the corre- with a decent regard to the spondence presented to Parlia- feelings of the Chinese Government. With regard to the ment so long as they are reasonYangtse region in particular, able, but without entering on the Association has done well exhausting controversies with to remind us that protection of that inanimate body, the that important zone of Central Tsungli-Yamên. For we must China is no new idea. It is remember that as yet there is there that our greatest com- only promise, but little in the mercial interests are consoli- way of achievement; and with dated, it is there that our poli- regard to the Yangtse Valley tical influence has been more 'tself, absolutely nothing has than anywhere in the ascendant been done to secure our position for many years. We had ar- there excepting the declaration ranged to defend it for China of Lord Salisbury with regard

As we

to the French claims in Shang- our rights in China. And it is hai. Since our policy in China especially important to observe has been, by our own self- that Germany is acting on her effacement, formed for us by view to our detriment, while we the action of other Powers, it are not acting on ours. is always well to take notice have said over and over again, of the views held by those it is not by protocols and Powers,

treaties that we shall secure In this connection there is a the enjoyment of our rights, significant despatch in the Blue- but by the only authority book from the Foreign Office which is now universally recogto the Ambassador in Berlin, nised, effective occupation. So dated 13th May. Lord Salis- far we have done little more bury, reporting an interview than turn the vessel's head to with the German Ambassador the current; we have yet to with regard to co-operation make headway against it, and in railway schemes in China, recover by strenuous exertion says: “His Excellency main- the ground we have lost. tained that Germany, by her There is a

pathetic side occupation of Kiao-chau, and to this voluminous blue-book. her agreement with China re When we consider the labour specting Shantung, has of statesmen and diplomatists quired a special position in embodied in these 360

pages, that province, which conse the strain of relations with quently is not unreservedly other Powers, the jarring, fricopen

to British enterprise ; tion, and commotion all round, whereas Great Britain not and reflect that all this is but a having occupied any place in laborious effort to recover some the Yangtse region, that region portion of the ground which is still unreservedly open to was lost through inadvertence, German enterprise :

—we may applaud the effort, quently, my suggestions did but cannot help holding it up not contain any element of as a warning against easy opreciprocity.”

timism and a policy of drift Although Lord Salisbury was in the future. T

in the future. The blue-book “unable to assent" to this prop- is a public confession of failure osition, it is well to know the containing the germ of amendview that Germany takes of ment.

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