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levied on those Italian citizens found to have no longer the status of shirker or deserter, and [who] do military service in American Army. As a result said Italian citizens are able to obtain complete remittal of the tax provided they have certificate from American military authorities to the effect that they are serving in American Army. Full details by mail.

NELSON PAGE

File No. 811.2222/13528h
The Secretary of State to the Chargé in Great Britain (Loughlin)

WASHINGTON, July 3, 1918. Sir: An understanding having been reached that the exchange of ratifications of the two military conventions between the United States and Great Britain signed at Washington on June 3, 1918, one in respect to the compulsory military service of citizens of the United States in Great Britain and British subjects in the United States, and the other in respect to compulsory military service of citizens of the United States in Canada and Canadian citizens in the United States, shall take place at London, I enclose herewith the President's instruments of ratification of the two conventions 1 for exchange for the like ratifications of the King of Great Britain. I also enclose the President's two full powers authorizing you to effect the two exchanges. A separate protocol of exchange should be signed in each case, and I further enclose, for your information, the form of protocol which is used at Washington. As soon as the exchange of ratifications has been effected it is desired that the Department be advised of the fact by cable.

The Senate having given its advice and consent to the ratification of the convention in respect to compulsory military service of citizens of the United States in Great Britain and British subjects in the United States on the condition that the ratifications thereof should not be exchanged until the Government of the United States by the President shall, by a general certificate, in accordance with the provisions of article 3 of the convention, exempt from military service citizens of the United States in Great Britain who are outside the ages of compulsory military service specified from time to time in the laws of the United States, for United States citizens, the President has signed in four originals a general certificate meeting this condition, two originals of which are sent to you herewith, one of which is to be retained in the Embassy, and the other to be transmitted to the British Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs in the manner hereinafter stated. The certificates are undated, and it is desired that they should bear the date of the day on which the

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exchange of ratifications takes place. You are therefore requested to insert that date in the two copies of the certificate enclosed herewith, and after the exchange of ratifications and on the same day, to transmit one of the copies to the British Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs as a formal notification to the Government of Great Britain given through you as provided in article 3 of the convention that all citizens of the United States in Great Britain outside the ages specified from time to time in the laws of the United States prescribing compulsory military service for United States citizens are and shall be exempt from compulsory military service in Great Britain.

For the information of the British Government you may add that the ages for compulsory military service of citizens of the United States specified in the existing laws of this country, are 21 to 30, both inclusive. I am [etc.]

ROBERT LANSING

File No. 811.2222/12898

The Greek Minister (Roussos) to the Secretary of State

[Translation]

AIDE-MÉMOIRE

I have the honor to inform the Department of State that my Government, to which I forwarded the text of the military convention agreed to by the United States of America and Great Britain, is ready to sign a similar convention with the Government of the United States.

However, I beg the Government of the United States kindly to examine the suggestion it makes in this connection which it believes worthy of its benevolent attention considering the grounds from which it springs.

The Royal Government is taking concern at the slowness, caused by the circumstances and the imperative needs of the Allies, with which the equipment and armament needed by the Greek Army are supplied. The mobilization of the Greek Army has been very much retarded, and has been effected in very small part, only because of the lack of needed supplies and equipment.

This condition causes the Government an apprehension that the enemy forces will be increased in the Balkans by German, Austrian, and Turkish forces. The activity lately displayed on the Balkan front, and the successes of the Allied troops will necessarily cause the Germans to aid their allies in every way, and this might create a dangerous situation which the Allies engaged on the western front may not be able to remedy by sending adequate reinforcements.

The United States still maintaining relations with Bulgaria will also be unable to send reinforcements.

In order to meet this difficulty the Royal Government submits to the examination of the Government of the United States the plan of forming with Greeks of military age, regiments, the men of which would be Greek subjects, and the corps of officers and non-commissioned officers exclusively American.

These regiments would form part of the American forces, and fight as American regiments without intervention of any kind on the part of Greece.

The usefulness of such a formation would be apparent only in case of a serious threat on the Balkan front, which would call for reinforcements which the Allies could not send. These troops made up of Greek subjects would only need a change of officers in order to become Greek troops, and be sent to the Balkans where they would strengthen the front without raising any question whatever.

I indulge the hope that this suggestion of the Royal Government, inspired only by the concern taken in the above-stated situation, will be examined with the attention it deserves, and if it is accepted, as I hope it may be, it might be settled through a separate agreement.

Among the Greeks living in America and liable to military service there are a small number of reserve officers and non-commissioned officers. As the Government of the United States cannot commission aliens as officers, the Royal Government begs the Government of the United States kindly to provide for the transportation of these men to a French port, whence they would be sent on to Greece. It involves a contingent of a few hundreds of men, the transportation of whom, even on cargo vessels, could be provided for without causing the least inconvenience.

WASHINGTON, July 17, 1918.

Treaty Series No. 633
Courention between the United States and Great Britain Relating to

Military Service of Citizens of the United States in. Great Britain
and of British Subjects in the United States, Signed at Washing-
ton, June 3, 1918 1
BY TIIE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

1

WHEREAS a Convention between the United States of America and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, providing for the reciprocal military service of citizens of the United States in

1

* Ratification advised by the Senate, June 24, 1918; ratified by the President, June 28, 1918; ratified by Great Britain, July 1, 1918; ratifications exchanged at London, July 30, 1918; proclaimed July 30, 1918.

Great Britain and British subjects in the United States, was concluded and signed by their respective Plenipotentiaries at Washington on the third day of June, one thousand nine hundred and eighteen, the original of which Convention is word for word as follows:

The President of the United States of America, and His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, being convinced that for the better prosecution of the present war it is desirable that citizens of the United States in Great Britain and British Subjects in the United States shall either return to their own country to perform military service in its army or shall serve in the army of the country in which they remain, have resolved to enter into a Convention to that end and have accordingly appointed as their Plenipotentiaries:

The President of the United States of America, Robert Lansing, Secretary of State of the United States; and

His Britannic Majesty, The Earl of Reading, Lord Chief Justice of England, High Commissioner and Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary on Special Mission to the United States,

who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers found to be in proper form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles :

ARTICLE I

All male citizens of the United States in Great Britain and all male British Subjects in the United States shall, unless before the time limited by this Convention they enlist or enroll in the forces of their own country or return to the United States or Great Britain respectively for the purpose of military service, be subject to military service and entitled to exemption or discharge therefrom under the laws and regulations from time to time in force of the country in which they are: Provided that in respect to British Subjects in the United States the ages for military service shall be for the time being twenty to forty-four years, both inclusive;

Provided however that no citizen of the United States in Great Britain and no British Subject in the United States who, before proceeding to Great Britain or the United States respectively, was ordinarily resident in a place in the possessions of the United States or in His Majesty's Dominions respectively, where the law does not impose compulsory military service shall, by virtue of this Convention, be liable to military service under the laws and regulations of Great Britain or the United States, respectively;

Provided further that in the event of compulsory military service being applied to any part of His Majesty's Dominions in which military service at present is not compulsory, British Subjects who, before proceeding to the United States were ordinarily resident in such part of His Majesty's Dominions, shall thereupon be included within the terms of this Convention.

ARTICLE II

Citizens of the United States and British Subjects within the age limits aforesaid who desire to enter the military service of their own country must, after making such application therefor as may be prescribed by the laws or regulations of the country in which they are, enlist or enroll or must leave Great Britain or the United States as the case may be for the purpose of military service in their own country before the expiration of sixty days after the date of the exchange of ratifications of this Convention, if liable to military service in the country in which they are at the said date; or if not so liable, then before the expiration of thirty days after the time when liability shall accrue; or as to those holding certificates of exemption under Article III of this Convention, before the expiration of thirty days after the date on which any such certificate becomes inoperative unless sooner renewed; or as to those who apply for certificates of exemption under Article III and whose applications are refused, then before the expiration of thirty days after the date of such refusal, unless the application be sooner granted.

ARTICLE III

The Government of the United States and His Britannic Majesty's Government may through their respective Diplomatic Representatives issue certificates of exemption from military service to citizens of the United States in Great Britain and British Subjects in the United States respectively, upon application or otherwise, within sixty days from the date of the exchange of ratifications of this Convention, or within thirty days from the date when such citizens or subjects become liable to military service in accordance with Article I, provided that the applications be made or the certificates be granted prior to their entry into the military service of either country.

Such certificates may be special or general, temporary or conditional, and may be modified, renewed, or revoked in the discretion of the Government granting them. Persons holding such certificates shall, so long as the certificates are in force, not be liable to military service in the country in which they are.

ARTICLE IV This Convention shall not apply to British Subjects in the United States (a) who were born or naturalized in Canada, and who, before

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