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staff rank, submorial of officers mittee on Militar

The bill was read, and passed to the second reading.
Ordered, That the report be printed.

Mr. Fairfield, from the Committee on Naval Affairs, to whom was referred the memorial of Elizabeth Sevier, submitted an adverse report: which was ordered to be printed.

Mr. Benton, from the Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred a memorial of officers of the United States army on brevet and staff rank, submitted a report: which was ordered to be printed.

Mr. Johnson, of Louisiana, from the Committee on Pensions, to whom was referred the bill (S. 39) granting a pension to Noah Conner, reported it without amendment, and submitted an adverse report on the subject: which was ordered to be printed.

Mr. Johnson, of Louisiana, from the Committee on Pensions, to whom was referred the petition of Eli Hinds, submitted an adverse report: which was ordered to be printed.

Mr. Johnson, of Louisiana, from the Committee on Pensions, to whom was referred the petition of Jemima Flood, submitted an adverse report: which was ordered to be printed.

Mr. Johnson, of Louisiana, from the Committee on Pensions, to whom was referred the petition of Elizabeth Gassaway, submitted an adverse report: which was ordered to be printed.

On motion by Mr. Johnson, of Louisiana, Ordered, That the Committee on Pensions be discharged from the consideration of the petition of Samuel R. Read, and from the further consideration of the petition of George Guier, and that the petitions be referred to the Committee on Naval Affairs.

Mr. Johnson, of Louisiana, from the Committee on Pensions, to whom was referred the bill (S. 46) explanatory of the fourth section of an act "making appropriations for the civil and diplomatic expenses of the gov: ernment for the year ending 30th June, 1846, and for other purposes," approved March 3d, 1845, reported it without amendment.

The Senate resumed, as in Committee of the Whole, the consideration of the resolution (S. R. 1) advising the President of the United States to give notice to the government of Great Britain that the government of the United States will, in virtue of the second article of the convention of the 6th of August, A. D. 1827, between the two governments, relative to the Oregon Territory, annul and abrogate that convention; and,

After debate, and the consideration, by unanimous consent, of Executive business,

The Senate adjourned.

THURSDAY, March 19, 1946.

· Mr. Bagby presented the memorial of Abraham P. Housman, administrator of Jacob Housman, deceased, praying indemnity for the destruction of his property by the Seminole Indians during the Florida war: which was referred to the Committee of Claims.

Mr. Dix presented the petition of Edward Hardy, praying the reim. bursement of the duties alleged to have been unlawfully exacted of him by the collector of the port of New York: which was referred to the Committee on Finance.

Mr. Dickinson presented the petition of the heirs and legal representatives of Cornelius Oakley, deceased, praying a pension for his services in the revolutionary war: which was referred to the Committee on Pensions.

Mr. Semple presented a petition of citizens of Union county, Illinois, praying the establishment of a national armory at Fort Massac, on the Ohio river, in that State: which was referred to the Committee on Military Affairs.

Mr. Dix presented a memorial of citizens of Cayuga county, remonstrating against the renewal of a patent heretofore granted to Jethro Wood for an improvement in the construction of a plough.

Ordered, That it lie on the table.

Mr. Dix presented the petition of George Trull, praying the reimbursement of the duties alleged to have been unlawfully exacted of him by the collector of the port of New York: which was referred to the Committee on Finance.

Mr. Sturgeon, from the Committee on Patents, to whom was referred the petition of Oliver C. Harris, reported a bill (S. 125) for his relief: which was read, and passed to the second reading.

On motion hy Mr. Dix, Ordered, That the Committee on Commerce be discharged from the further consideration of the petition of citizens of Philadelphia that steel may be admitted free of duty, and that it be referred to the Committee on Finance.

Mr. Dix, from the Committee on Commerce, to whom the subject was referred, reported the following resolution; which was read:

Resolved, That the Secretary of War be requested to communicate to the Senate all the information in the bureaus connected with the Department of War in relation to the relative capacities of the harbors between Erie and Buffalo, on lake Erie, of being made ports of refuge for vessels compelled to seek a harbor by stress of weather, with the plans of improvement which have been made, together with the estimates of expenditure necessary to execute such plans, the sums of money heretofore expended, the condition of the work already performed, and any other data by which an accurate opinion may be formed as to the most prompt and economical method of securing a port of refuge on that part of lake Erie above referred to.

On motion by Mr. Mangum, Ordered, That when the Senate adjourn, it be to Monday next. Mr. Dickinson, from the Committee on Naval Affairs, to whom was referred the petition of J. Melville Gilliss, reported a resolution:

“ That the prayer of the petitioner ought not to be granted.”

Mr. Breese, from the Committee on Public Lands, reported a resolution (S. R. 20) to provide for the publication of a code of land laws and instructions: which was read, and passed to the second reading.

Mr. Bright reported from the committee that they had examined and found duly enrolled the bill (H. R. 260) to repeal the act requiring one of the judges of the circuit court for the District of Columbia hereafter to reside in Alexandria.

The Senate resumed, as in Committee of the Whole, the consideration of the resolution (S. R. 1) advising the President of the United States to give notice to the government of Great Britain that the government of the United States will, in virtue of the second article of the convention of the

6th of August A. D. 1827, between the two governments, relative to the Oregon Territory, annul and abrogate that convention: and

After debate, and the consideration, by unanimous consent, of Executive business, The Senate adjourned.

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 1846.

The following message was received from the President of the United States, by Mr. Walker, his secretary: To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States :

I transmit, for your consideration, a correspondence between the minister of her Britannic majesty in Washington and the Secretary of State, containing an arrangement for the adjustment and payment of the claims of the respective governments upon each other, arising from the collection of certain import duties in violation of the second article of the commercial convention of 3d of July, 1815, between the two countries; and I respectfully submit to Congress the propriety of making provision to carry this arrangement into effect.

The second article of this convention provides that “no higher or other duties shall be imposed on the importation into the United States of any articles the growth, produce, or manufacture of his Britannic majesty's territories in Europe, and no higher or other duties shall be imposed on the importation into the territories of his Britannic majesty in Europe of any articles the growth, produce, or manufacture of the United States, than are or shall be payable on the like articles, being the growth, produce, or manufacture of any other foreign country.”

Previous to the act of Parliament of the 13th of August, 1836, the duty on foreign rough rice imported into Great Britain was two shillings and sixpence sterling per bushel. By this act the duty was reduced to one penny per quarter of eight bushels) on the rough rice “imported from the west coast of Africa.”.

Upon the earnest and repeated remonstrances of our ministers at London, in opposition to this discrimination against American and in favor of African rice, as a violation of the subsisting convention, Parliament, by the act of 9th July, 1842, again equalized the duty on all foreign rough rice by fixing it at seven shillings per quarter. In the intervening period, however, of nearly six years, large importations had been made into Great Britain of American rough rice, which was subjected to a duty of two shillings and sixpence per bushel; but the importers, knowing their rights under the convention, claimed that it should be admitted at the rate of one penny per quarter, the duty imposed on African rice. This claim was resisted by the British government, and the excess of duty was paid, at the first, under protest, and afterwards, in consequence of an arrangement with the board of customs, by the deposite of exchequer bills.

It seems to have been a clear violation both of the letter and spirit of the convention to admit rough rice, “the growth” of Africa, at one penny per quarter, whilst the very same article, - the growth” of the United States, was charged with a duty of two shillings and sixpence per bushel.

The claim of Great Britain, under the same article of the convention, is founded on the tariff act of 30th August, 1842. Its 25th section provides “that nothing in this act contained shall apply to goods shipped in a ves. sel bound to any port of the United States actually having left her last port of lading eastward of the Cape of Good Hope, or beyond Cape Horn, prior to the first day of September, 1842; and all legal provisions and regulations existing immediately before the 30th day of June, 1842, shall be applied to importations which may be made in vessels which have left such last port of lading eastward of the Cape of Good Hope, or beyond Cape Horn, prior to said first day of September, 1842.” :

The British government contends that it was a violation of the second article of the convention for this act to require that “ articles, the growth, produce, or manufacture of Great Britain, when imported into the United States in vessels which had left their last port of lading in Great Britain prior to the first day of September, 1842, should pay any “higher or other duties” than were imposed on “like articles," the growth, produce, or manufacture” of countries beyond the Cape of Good Hope and Cape Horn.

Upon a careful consideration of the subject, I arrived at the conclusion that this claim on the part of the British government was well founded. I deem it unnecessary to state my reasons at length for adopting this opinion, the whole subject being fully explained in the letter of the Secretary of the Treasury and the accompanying papers. '

The amount necessary to satisfy the British claim cannot at present be ascertained with any degree of accuracy, no individual having yet presented his case to the government of the United States. It is not apprehended that the amount will be large. After such examination of the subject as it has been in his power to make, the Secretary of the Treasury believes that it will not exceed $100,000.

On the other hand, the claims of the importers of rough rice into Great Britain have been already ascertained, as the duties were paid either under protest, or in exchequer bills. Their amount is stated by Mr. Everett, our late minister at London, in a despatch dated June 1, 1843, to be £88,886 16s. 10d. sterling, of which £60,006 Os. 4d. belong to citizens of the United States.

As it may be long before the amount of the British claim can be ascertained, and it would be unreasonable to postpone payment to the American claimants until this can be adjusted, it has been proposed to the British government immediately to refund the excess of duties collected by it on American rough rice. I should entertain a confident hope that this proposal would be accepted, should the arrangement concluded be sanctioned by an act of Congress making provision for the return of the duties in question. The claimants might then be paid as they present their demands, properly authenticated, to the Secretary of the Treasury.

JAMES K. POLK. WASHINGTON, March 23, 1846.

The message was read.
Ordered, That it be referred to the Committee on Finance and printed.

The Vice President laid before the Senate a report of the Secretary of the Treasury, made in compliance with a resolution of the Senate, showing the condition of the building intended for a marine hospital at New Orleans, and the cost of completing it; the sum paid monthly for the rent of the building now used, and the monthly expenses of the establishment. The report was read, and ordered to be printed.

Mr. Bright presented a petition of citizens of Indiana, praying the construction of a wire suspension bridge across the Ohio river: which was referred to the Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads.

Mr. Sturgeon presented the memorial of members of the bar of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, praying that the unexpended appropriation for the salary of the associate justice of the supreme court for the third judicial circuit may be divided among the several district judges in that circuit.

Ordered, That it lie on the table. Mr.' Cameron presented seven petitions of citizens of Pennsylvania, praying the adoption of measures for abolishing slavery in the United States.

A motion was made that the petitions be received: and being objected to,

Ordered, That the motion lie on the table. Mr. Dix presented two petitions of citizens of New York, praying the abrogation of the treaties of December, 1838, and May, 1842, with the Seneca Indians: which were referred to the Committee on Indian Affairs.

Mr. Atchison presented a petition of citizens of Missouri, praying the adoption of measures for terminating the convention between the United States and Great Britain, relative to the Oregon Territory, and the extension of the laws of the United States over said Territory.

Ordered, That it lie on the table. Mr. Westcott presented the memorial of Daniel Simmons, praying in. demnity for the destruction of his property by the Seminole Indians in the Florida war: which was referred to the Committee of Claims. "

Mr. Westcott presented the petition of the heirs of Jonathan Johnson, deceased, an officer in the revolutionary army, praying to be allowed commutation pay: which was referred to the Committee on Revolutionary Claims.

Mr. Breese presented the petition of Martha Moore, widow of a deceased revolutionary soldier, praying a pension: which was referred to the Committee on Pensions.

Mr. Breese presented the petition of Priscilla Green, widow of a de. ceased revolutionary soldier, praying a pension: which was referred to the Committee on Pensions.

Mr. Breese presented a petition of citizens of Carroll parish, Louisiana, praying the establishment of a national armory and foundery at Fort Mas. sac, on the Ohio river: which was referred to the Committee on Military Affairs.

Mr. Speight presented a memorial of the legislature of the State of Mississippi, praying that certain settlers on the public lands in that State may be confirmed in their pre-emption rights: which was referred to the Committee on Public Lands.

Mr. Woodbridge presented a petition of citizens of Milwaukie, Wiscon. sin Territory, praying the establishment of a daily mail on the route between Milwaukie and Detroit: which was referred to the Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads.

Mr. Fairfield presented the petition of Michael Bowden, a revolutionary soldier, praying a pension: which was referred to the Committee on Pen sions.

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