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To the Senate of the United States :

I communicate, herewith, a report from the Secretary of State, in answer o the resolution of the Senate of the 18th of June, 1846, calling for certain nformation in relation to the Oregon Territory,

JAMES K. POLK. WASHINGTON, July 21, 1846.

The messages were read.

On motion by Mr. Allen, Ordered, That the message relating to the Puget's Sound Agricultural Company and the Hudson's Bay Company, and the report of the Secreary of State communicated therewith, be printed in confidence for the use of the Senate.

On motion by Mr. Allen, Ordered, That the message communicating certain correspondence relaive to the Territory of Oregon be printed in confidence for the use of the Senate.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 1846.

On motion by Mr. Breese, That the Senate proceed to consider the resolution submitted by Mr. Allen on the 19th June, to remove the injunction of secrecy from the treaty, documents, and proceedings relating to Oregon:

s Yeas, . .

. . . 22 It was determined in the negative,

" Nays, . . . . . . . . *30 On motion by Mr. Allen, The yeas and nays being desired by one-fifth of the Senators present, Those who voted in the affirmative are, Messrs. Allen, Atchison, Atherton, Barrow, Breese, Bright, Cameron, Cass, Chalmers, John M. Clayton, Crittenden, Dickinson, Fairfield, Hannegan, Jarnagin, Mangum, Rusk, Semple, Simmons, Sturgeon, Turney, Westcott.

Those who voted in the negative are, Messrs. Archer, Ashley, Bagby, Benton, Berrien, Calhoun, Cilley, Corvin, Dayton, Dix, Evans, Greene, Haywood, Houston, Huntington, Johnson, of Maryland, Johnson, of Louisiana, Lewis, Miller, Morehead, Niles, Pearce, Pennybacker, Phelps, Sevier, Speight, Upham, Webster, Woodvridge, Yulee

THURSDAY, AUGUST 6, 1846.

On motion by Mr. Hannegan, The Senate proceeded to consider the resolution submitted by him on he 10th July last, to remove the injunction of secrecy from the treaty with Great Britain relative to the Oregon Territory, and the correspondence vhich accompanied it, and all the proceedings thereon, including the peeches and remarks of Senators, and agreed thereto.

FRIDAY, August 7, 1846. Mr. Hannegan submitted the following resolution; which was considred, by unanimous consent, and agreed to:

Resolved, That the injunction of secrecy be removed from all the correspondence heretofore communicated to the Senate in executive session relative to the Oregon Territory.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 1846.

Mr. Hannegan submitted the following resolution; which was consid. ered, by unanimous consent, and agreed to:

Resolved, That two thousand copies of the journal, correspondence, and documents connected with the Oregon treaty, be printed for the use of the Senate.

Proceedings of the Senate on the message of the President relating to

affairs with the republic of Mexico, from which the injunction of secrecy has been removed.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, 1846.

The following message was received from the President of the United States, by Mr: Walker, his secretary: To the Senate of the United States :

I herewith communicate to the Senate the copy of a letter, under date of the 27th ultimo, from the Secretary of State of the United States to the Minister of Foreign Relations of the Mexican republic, again propo sing to open negotiations and conclude a treaty of peace, which shall ad. just all the questions in dispute between the two republics. Considering the relative power of the two countries, the glorious events which have already signalized our arms, and the distracted condition of Mexico, I did not conceive that any point of national honor could exist which ought to prevent me from making this overture. Equally anxious to terminate, by a peace honorable for both parties, as I was originally to avoid the existing war, I have deemed it my duty again to extend the olive branch to Mexico. Should the government of that republic accept the offer in the same friendly spirit by which it was dictated, negotiations will speedily commence for the conclusion of a treaty.

The chief difficulty to be anticipated in the negotiation is the adjustment of the boundary between the parties, by a line which shall at once be satisfactory and convenient to both, and such as neither will hereafter be inclined to disturb. This is the best mode of securing perpetual peace and good neighborhood between the two republics. Should the Mexican government, in order to accomplish these objects, be willing to cede any portion of their territory to the United States, we ought to pay them a fair equivalent; a just and honorable peace, and not conquest, being our purpose in the prosecution of the war.

Under these circumstances, and considering the exhausted and distracted condition of the Mexican republic, it might become necessary, in order to restore peace, that I should have it in my power to advance a portion of the consideration money for any cession of territory which may be made, The Mexican government might not be willing to wait for the payment of

the whole until the treaty could be ratified by the Senate, and an appropriation to carry it into effect be made by Congress; and the necessity for such a delay might defeat the object altogether. I would, therefore, suggest whether it might not be wise for Congress to appropriate a sum such as hey might consider adequate for this purpose, to be paid, if necessary, immediately upon the ratification of the treaty by Mexico. This disbursement would of course be accounted for at the treasury, not as secret service money, but like other expenditures.

Two precedents for such a proceeding exist in our past history, during he administration of Mr. Jefferson, to which I would call your attention. On the 26th of February, 1803, Congress passed an act appropriating two millions of dollars “ for the purpose of defraying any extraordinary expenses which may be incurred in the intercourse between the United States and foreign nations,” “ to be applied under the direction of the President of the United States, who shall cause an account of the expenditure thereof to be laid before Congress as soon as may be;" and, on the 13th of February, 1806, an appropriation was made of the same amount, and in the same terms. The object, in the first case, was to enable the Presiaent to obtain the cession of Louisiana; and, in the second, that of the Floridas. In neither case was the money actually drawn from the treasury; and I should hope that the result might be similar, in this respect, on the present occasion, though the appropriation is deemed expedient as a precautionary measure.

I refer the whole subject to the Senate in executive session. If they should concur in opinion with me, then I recommend the passage of a law appropriating such a sum as Congress may deem adequate, to be used by the Executive, if necessary, for the purpose which I have indicated.

In the two cases to which I have referred, the special purpose of the appropriation did not appear on the face of the law, as this might have defeated the object; neither, for the same reason, in my opinion, ought it now to be stated.

I also communicate to the Senate the copy of a letter from the Secretary of State to Commodore Conner of the 27th ultimo, which was transmitted to him on the day it bears date.

JAMES K. POLK. WASHINGTON, August 4, 1846.

The message was read.

On motion by Mr. McDuffie, Ordered, That the message, with the documents communicated therewith, relating to affairs with the republic of Mexico, be referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 5, 1846.

Mr. McDuffie, from the Committee on Foreign Relations, to whom were referred, on the 4th instant, the message and documents relating to affairs with the republic of Mexico, reported the following resolutions:

Resolved, That the course adopted and proposed by the President, as indicated in his message of the 4th instant, for the speedy termination of the war with Mexico, receives the approbation of the Senate.

Resolved, That, in the opinion of the Senate, it is expedient to place

two millions of dollars at the disposal of the President, to be used at his discretion in the event of a treaty of peace with Mexico, satisfactorily ad. justing the boundaries of the two countries; and that the Committee on Foreign Relations be instructed to report to the Senate, in open session, a bill for that purpose, in conformity to the provisions of similar acts passed in 1803 and 1806.

The Senate, by unanimous consent, proceeded to consider the said res. olutions; and,

After debate,

On motion by Mr. McDuffie, the second' resolution was modified to read as follows:

Resolved, That, in the opinion of the Senate, it is expedient to place a sum of money at the disposal of the President, to be used at his discretion in the event of a treaty of peace with Mexico, satisfactorily adjusting the boundaries of the two countries.

Mr. Hannegan submitted the following as an amendment to the said resolutions: To strike out all after the word “Resolved,” in the first resolution, to the end of the second resolution, and insert:

That the Senate heartily unite with the President in his expressed desire for a speedy and honorable peace with Mexico; but, as at present informed, they have no further advice to give in the premises.

On motion by Mr. Crittenden, Ordered, That the resolutions reported by the committee, as modified, be recommitted to the Committee on Foreign Relations.

THURSDAY, August 6, 1846.

Mr. McDuffie, from the Committee on Foreign Relations, to whom were recommitted on the 5th instant the resolutions reported. on that day, reported the following resolutions:

1st. Resolved, That the Senate entertain a strong desire that the existing war with Mexico should be terminated by a treaty of peace, just and honorable to both nations; and that the President be advised to adopt all proper measures for the attainment of that object.

2d. Resolved further, That the Senate deem it advisable that Congress should appropriate a sum of money to enable the President to conclude a treaty of peace, limits, and boundaries with the republic of Mexico, and to be used by him in the event that such treaty should call for the expenditure of the money so appropriated, or any part thereof.

The Senate, by unanimous consent, proceeded to consider the said resolutions: and, On the question to agree to the first resolution:

A tis Yeas, . . . . . . . 45 It was determined in the affirmative,

Nays, . . . . . . . 2 On motion by Mr. Breese, The yeas and nays being desired by one-fifth of the Senators present, Those who voted in the affirmative are,

Messrs. Archer, Ashley, Atherton, Bagby, Barrow, Benton, Berrien, Bright, Calhoun, Cass, Chalmers, Cilley, Thomas Clayton, John M. Clayton, Corwin, Crittenden, Davis, Dickinson, Dix, Evans, Fairfield, Greene, Houston, Huntington, Jarnagin, Johnson, of Maryland, Johnson, of Louisiana, McDuffie, Mangum, Miller, Morehead, Niles, Pearce, Phelps, Se

vier, Simmons, Speight, Sturgeon, Turney, Upham, Westcott, Woodbridge, Yulee.

Those who voted in the negative are,
Messrs. Atchison, Rusk.
So the first resolution was agreed to. :

On motion by Mr. McDuffie, Ordered, That the Secretary of the Senate be directed to retain the bill from the House of Representatives (H. R. 50) “ making appropriations for the civil and diplomatic expenses of the government for the year ending the 30th day of June, 1847, and for other purposes,” which passed the Senate with amendments on the 5th instant, and not communicate the same to the House of Representatives until the further order of the Senate.

On motion by Mr. Sevier, Ordered, That the vote on the adoption of the said order be reconsidered.

On motion by Mr. Atchison, to amend the second resolution by inserting, after the word “Mexico," the following words: and for the purchase of the whole or a part of Upper California:

s Yeas, . . . . . . . 11

"* was determined in the negative, 7 Navs.....

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On motion by Mr. Atchison, The yeas and nays being desired by one-fifth of the Senators present, Those who voted in the affirmative are,

Messrs. Allen, Atchison, Benton, Breese, Bright, Cass, Dix, Pearce, Sevier, Sturgeon, Woodbridge.

Those who voted in the negative are,

Messrs. Archer, Ashley, Atherton, Bagby, Barrow, Berrien, Chalmers, Cilley, Thomas Clayton, Corwin, Crittenden, Davis, Evans, Greene, Hannegan, Houston, Huntington, Jarnagin, Johnson, of Maryland, Johnson, of Louisiana, Lewis, McDuffie, Mangum, Miller, Morehead, Niles, Phelps, Semple, Simmons, Speight, Turney, Upham, Westcott, Yulee.

On motion by Mr. Pearce, to amend the second resolution by adding thereto the following proviso: Provided, That no part of the said sum of money shall be applied to the purchase of any part of California: 1

On motion by Mr. Semple, to amend this proposed amendment by adding thereto the words, until after the conclusion of a peace with Mexico:

It was determined in the negative.
On the question to agree to the amendment proposed by Mr. Pearce:
It was determined in the negative, Yeas, · · · ·,'.· . ?

Nays, . . . . . .

32 On motion by Mr. Sevier, The yeas and nays being desired by one-fifth of the Senators present, Those who voted in the affirmative are,

Messrs. Cilley, Thomas Clayton, Miller, Pearce, Phelps, Semple, Upham. Those who voted in the negative are, in'

it.. Messrs. Allen, Archer, Ashley, Atchison, Atherton, Bagby, Barrow, Benton, Bright, Calhoun, Cameron, Cass, Chalmers, Corwin, Dickinson, Dix, Fairfield, Hannegan, Houston, Johnson, of Louisiana, Lewis, McDuffie, Mangum, Niles, Rusk, Sevier, Speight, Sturgeon, Turney, Westcott, Woodbridge, Yulee.

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