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dry just now, the smoke in the face of mounted men making progress difficult. They rode through the burning veldt, however, to find the Boers awaiting attack in a strong natural position; but the flank turned, they fled once more. Lord Dundonald in pursuit had, during the day, to ride forty miles over a waterless country, most of the time through the smoke.

On the 15th inst. General Buller occupied Dundee, to find that 2500 Boers had just left by train for Laing's Nek, the rest of the 7000 who had held the Biggarsberg retreating during the night, to fight small, delaying actions on the way. Following in pursuit, he reached Glencoe, to find that the enemy, with eleven guns, had left by train at dawn. So General Hildyard was spread along the railway, from Elandslaagte, to repair it; General Lyttelton in rear at Sunday's river; while General Buller with the 2nd division pushed on to Newcastle, which he entered unopposed on the evening of the 17th. Thus the Boer left was turned, and the defenders all along the line driven out in five days with insignificant loss by following a scheme suggested by commonsense. Our left had remained on Sunday's river south of Elandslaagte; the right, as a flying column, striking rapidly at the extreme eastern flank of the enemy's position, to hold him there till the main body came up to Dundee, where it threatened the most sensitive

point in Boer resistance. The roads were bad, mostly deep sand, drifts almost impassable; heavy guns had to be dragged; a large convoy followed; in front and flanks the rugged line of the Biggarsberg, scored with trenches and prepared artillery positions, commanded every inch of advance. Yet a simple move to a flank carried our army round, victoriously, and sent the Boers scattering headlong in confusion. The American attaché's remark after Colenso, "Was there no way round?" was admirably illustrated.

From Newcastle Lord Dundonald with the cavalry pushed on to Laing's Nek, where he found the Boers disposed to stand after their demoralised flight, the 2nd infantry division following as far as the Ingogo. General Buller with the remainder of the column remained in Newcastle to await the arrival of stores delayed by the state of the line. So a short breathing-time was granted to the fugitives, and the army, nothing loath, settled down for a short rest after the steady march of the last nine days through those grim mountains, where two months ago death and starvation stalked supreme, to emerge into the sunlight of the open country in front, Buller, calm and inscrutable, those stern-faced men in khaki streaming after, content to follow a leader whom - in spite of varying fortune-they know and honour, whose place has been with them where the bullets flew thickest.

INDEX TO VOL. CLXVII.

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Auckland, a visit to, 220 et seq.-the
servant question in, 223-the rising
generation of, 225-the gardens of,
226.

Australian cricket in England, last
season's, scores of, 780 et seq.-bowl-
ing analyses of, 785.

BALLAD OF FOULWEATHER JACK, 788.
Beaton, Cardinal, the character of, 613.
Belmont, the battle of, 124 et seq.,
850.

Benighted Lands, an expedition into
the, 383 et seq.

Blackmore, R. D., place of, in literature,
340.
Bloemfontein, preparations necessary

for Lord Roberts' advance on, 293 et
seq.-the march on, 577-importance
of possession of, 579-Lord Roberts
at, 734 et seq., 860-his advance from,
863 et seq.

Boer domination in South Africa, neces-
sity for the overthrow of, 156 et seq.,
588 et seq.

Boer trenches, protection afforded by,
575.

BRITANNIA, FLOREAT, 857.

British ascendancy in South Africa, the
new policy of, 310 et seq.-enthusiasm
aroused by the contest for, 312-neces-
sity for the maintenance of, 322 et
seq., 330 et seq.

British Colonies, the, present unity of
feeling amongst, 492, 584-Disraeli's
utterances regarding, 492 et seq.
BRITISH POLICY IN SOUTH AFRICA, 147.
British railways, insufficiencies of, for
present requirements, 647 et seq.-
congestion of goods traffic on, 649 et
seq.-the railway rates of, 652-rapid-
ity of travel on, 653-deficiencies of
engines on, 655-parliamentary super-
vision of, 657.

British soldiers, capture of, in South
African war, preventible causes of,
297, 852 et seq.

Brown-Bess, shooting powers of the old,
166.

Buchan, eleventh Earl of, early years of,
558-estate of Dryburgh bought by,
559-Society of Antiquaries founded
by, 561- -as a patron of letters, ib.-
intimacy of, with Sir Walter Scott,
562- Anonymous and Fugitive Es-
says' by, 563 et seq.-busts and por-
traits of, 567.

Buller, General, attempts of, to relieve
Ladysmith, 306 et seq., 431 et seq.,
438 et seq., 444, 741 et seq.-the fail-
ures of, as a commander, 747-rout of
the Boers in the Biggarsberg by, 869

et seq.
Bullets, circumstances determining the
flight of, 163 et seq.-velocity and
energy of, 165-range of, in modern
warfare, 176 et seq.

BULLETS, SHOT, SHELL, AND, 163.
BUSH-WHACKING: I., 1-II., 194–III.,

383.

Button's coffee-house, the habitués of,
112.

CABLES, SUBMARINE, 355.

Carlisle, fifth Earl of, letters from George
Selwyn to, 74 et seq.-character of, 82.
Cavalry horses, difficulty of feeding, in
South Africa, 573.

Cavalry, importance of, in South African
war, 298.

Cavalry service, the, recent depreciation
of, 767-recruits for, 768-horses for,
769 et seq.-composition of, 771-im-
portance of, in the South African war,
774-effects of a sea-voyage on the
horses of, 776-firearms for, 779.
CHESTERFIELD, A COMIC, 557.
CHILDREN OF THE HOUSE OF KAJAR,
749.

Cider Cellars, suppers at the, 121.
CITY, THE FAITHFUL, 847.
Coffee-house, the old London, life of the,
113 et seq.

COLD DAY IN MID-CANADA, A, 53.
COLONIES, DISRAELI AND THE, 492.
COMIC CHESTERFIELD, A, 557.
Comyn, slaying of, by Bruce, 605.
CONCERNING OUR CAVALRY, 767.
Congreve, disappearance of the plays of,
from the stage, 832-indebtedness of
Sheridan to, 833.

CONSERVATIVES, A WORD TO, 288.
Continental feeling, expression of, evoked

by the South African war, 316 et seq.,
421 et seq.

COTTON CROP OF 1900, THE LOW NILE
OF 1899 IN RELATION TO THE, 247.
Cricket, leg-play in, suggestion regard-
ing, 786.

Crimea, a visit to the, 45 et seq.
Cronje, Commandant, defeat of, at Mod-

der river, 442-retreat of, 443-sur-
render of, 577.

DEPARTMENT, THE INTELLIGENCE, 725.
DEPARTURE OF A 2ND LIEUTENANT FOR
THE FRONT, THE, 818.

Desertas, the, value of, as a telegraph-
station, 361.

DIARY OF A BOER BEFORE LADYSMITH,
700.

Dick's Tavern, London, some celebrities
of, 119-the Rambler club at, 120.
DISRAELI AND THE COLONIES, 492.
Disraeli, Mr, scenes in Parliament on
the passing of the Reform Bill of, 29
-funeral of, 41-Sir John Mowbray's
reminiscences of, 50.

Donga, a South African, described, 299.
'Drama of Yesterday and To-day, the,'
by Clement Scott, noticed, 99 et seq.
DRAMA, THE VICTORIAN, 98.
Early Married Life of Maria Josepha,
Lady Stanley, with extracts from Sir
John Stanley's "Preterita," edited
by one of their Grandchildren, Jane
H. Adeane, notice of, 250 et seq.

EPISODE OF THE INDIAN MUTINY, AN,
615.

Evans's Tavern, London, the company

at, 121.
EVOLUTION

THE, 363.

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Expedition into the Benighted Lands,
an, 383 et seq.

FAITHFUL CITY, THE, 847.

Fiction, changes in popular taste with
regard to, 363 et seq.

FLAG, TRIBUTE TO THE, 507.
FLOREAT BRITANNIA, 857.

FOULWEATHER JACK, BALLad of, 788.
'Frames of Mind,' by A. B. Walkley,
notice of, 107.

FROM A COUNTRY HOUSE IN NEW
ZEALAND, 220.

FRONT, DEPARTURE OF A 2ND LIEU-
TENANT FOR the, 818.

Froude, Mr J. A., friendly attitude of,
towards the Boers, 329.
FUTURE, THE TORY, 182.

'George Selwyn, his Letters and his
Life,' notice of, 75 et seq.
GEORGE SELWYN'S LETTERS, 74.
'Girlhood of Maria Josepha Holroyd
[Lady Stanley of Alderley], recorded
in Letters of a hundred years ago
from 1776 to 1796,' edited by J. H.
Adeane, notice of, 250 et seq.
Gladstone, Mr, the Reform Bill of, in

Parliament, 26 et seq.-vote of censure
on the Government of, in 1885, 41-in-
troduction of the second Home Rule
Bill of, 44-some reminiscences of, 51
-history of the portrait of, at Oxford,

52.

GOLDWIN SMITH, MR, SCOTLAND AND,
541.

Goods traffic, congestion of, on British
railways, 649 et seq.-utilisation of
canals for, 651.

Government of South Africa, the future,
suggestions for, 333 et seq.-part to
be taken by the Home Government
in, 337 et seq.

Government, Radical attacks on the, in
connection with the war in South
Africa, 289 et seq.

GREAT SOLDIERS, TWO, 700.
HER MAJESTY'S SERVICE, ON, 551.
Historical MSS. Commission, sugges

tions as to the publications of the, 75.
'History of Scotland from the Roman
Occupation, a,' by Andrew Lang, vol.
i., review of, 599 et seq.
Home Rule Bill, introduction of Mr
Gladstone's second, 44.
Howitzer, the, description of, 180-pro-
jectile for, 181.

Hurrah for the Life of a Sailor! Fifty
Years in the Royal Navy,' by Vice-
Admiral Sir William Kennedy, K.C.B.,
review of, 821 et seq.

'Imperial Russian Navy, the; its Past,
Present, and Future,' by Fred. T.
Jane, notice of, 457 et seq.
INDIAN MUTINY, AN EPISODE OF THE,
615.

Indian Mutiny, the: The Outbreak, 615
-We leave Fatehgarh, 616-Back
in Fatehgarh, 619-The 10th mutiny
at last, 621-My adventurous Escape,
622-In the Fort, 625-The Siege, 627
-We take to the Boats, 631-Disas
ter to the Boats, 634-A desperate
Situation, 635 In hiding in the
Cane-fields, 638-Safe again in Fateh-
garh, 641-The Fate of my Compan-
ions, 642.

Indian rivers, value of, for irrigation,

658 for navigation, 659-and for
domestic and other purposes, 660—
suggestion for utilising the water of,
662 et seq.
Intelligence Department, lack of an, in
England, during the Crimean war,
725-deficiencies of the, in the Abys
sinian expedition of 1868, 727-in the
Ashantee expedition of 1873-74, ib.-
and in the Suakim expedition, ib.-
history of the British, 728 et seq.-
suggestions for its improvement, 730
-superiority of the Boer, in the pres
ent war, 732.

----

INTELLIGENCE DEPARTMENT, THE, 725.
JIM, LORD: A SKETCH, Chaps. VIII.,

IX., 60—x., XI., 234—XII., XIII., 406–
XIV.-XVI., 511–xvII.-xx., 666-xxI.-
XXIII., 803.

Johnson, Dr, London taverns patronised
by, 114 et seq.
JOSEPHA, MARIA, 250.

KAJAR, CHILDREN OF THE HOUSE OF,
749.

Kennedy, Admiral Sir William, early
naval experiences of, 822-in the
Crimea, ib. in the China war, 823
et seq.-later services of, 826-his
love of sport, 827 et seq.
Kimberley, Lord Methuen's advance on,
124 et seq.-the relief of, 339, 443 et
seq.

Kitchener, Lord, special duties of, in
the South African war, 861 et seq.
Koorn Spruit, the Boer ambush at, 735,
851.

Kruger, President, attitude of, towards
Great Britain, 150-autocratic rule of,
151, 588-treatment of the Uitlanders
by, 151 et seq.-war forced on by,
153, 315.
LADYSMITH, DIARY OF A Boer before,
700.

Ladysmith, sorties from, 137 et seq.-
Boer attack on, repulsed, 302-Gen-
eral Buller's first attempt to relieve,
306 et seq., 741-his second attempt,
431 et seq., 741-his third attempt,

438 et seq., 742-renewed efforts for
relief of, 444, 743-retreat of the
Boers investing, 444-relief of, accom-
plished, 581, 744-life in, during the
siege, 582 et seq.-failure to follow up
Boer retreat at, 739 et seq.

'Lays of the Deer Forest' by John
Sobieski and Charles Edward Stuart,
merits of, 264-history of the authors
of, ib. et seq.-references to the chase
in, 268 et seq.

LESSONS, THE ADDRESS AND ITS, 445.
LETTERS, GEORGE SELWYN'S, 74.
Liberalism, the history of, 182 et seq.-
refugees from, in the Conservative
ranks, 185-selfish policy of, 188, 191
et seq.

LIFE OF A SAILOR, THE, 821.
LIGHT OF OTHER DAYS, A, 86.
LIGHT OF THESE DAYS, A, 209.
LITERARY DECENCY, THE EVOLUTION
OF, 363.

Local rifle clubs, Lord Salisbury's advice
as to the formation of, 830.
Lockhart, Sir William, early years of,
in India, 717-in the Abyssinian ex-
pedition, 718-with Lord Roberts at
Kabul, 719-assumes command of
24th Punjab Infantry, ib.-with the
Chitral Mission, 720-services of, in
Upper Burma, 722-at head of Tirah
expeditionary force, 723 becomes
Commander-in-Chief in India, 724-
his death, ib.

LORD JIM: A SKETCH, Chaps. VIII.,
Ix., 60—x., xI., 234—XII., XIII., 406–
XIV.-XVI., 511--xvII.-xx., 666-xxI.-
XXIII., 803.

Low NILE OF 1899, THE, IN RELATION

TO THE COTTON CROP OF 1900, 247.
Lowe, Mr, classical quotation by, in
House of Commons, on Mr Gladstone's
Reform Bill, 27.

Lyddite shell, effects of, 179.
Mafeking, the investment of, 135 et seq.,
866-the relief of, 867 et seq.
Magersfontein, the battle of, 132 et seq.,
850-death of General Wauchope at,
133.

Maoris, characteristics of the, 223, 230
et seq.
MARIA JOSEPHA,

250.
Martineau, Dr, philosophical achieve-
ments of, 341.

MEDICAL CORPS, THE ROYAL ARMY,
371.

MID-CANADA, A COLD DAY IN, 53.
Misplaced sentiment, examples of, in the
South African war, 858 et seq.
Mitre Tavern, Johnson and Boswell at
the, 114.
Morality in English literature, revolu-
tion in public sentiment regarding,
363 et seq.-probable cause of change
of taste as to, 368 et seq.

Mounted infantry, special need for, in NEW LIGHT ON Old Cricket, 780.

the South African war, 434.

MR RUSKIN, 340.

-MR SHAW, SHERIDAN AND, 832.

'MSS. of the Earl of Carlisle, preserved
at Castle Howard,' notice of, 74 et seq.
MUSINGS WITHOUT METHOD :-

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February: One Man, one Book, 275
-The Use and Abuse of Diaries, ib.-
Sir Mountstuart Grant Duff's Record
of Trivialities, 276-A Herbarium of
Poets and Statesmen, 277-Another
Whig Official, 278 Sir Algernon
West's Confessions, 279-The Indis-
cretion of Nicknames, ib. - Greville
and Sir Algernon West, 280 - The
Dangers of Dining out, 281-Panto-
mimes New and Old, ib.-Patriotism
behind the Footlights, 282-Journal-
ism and the War, 283-The Exagger-
ation of Correspondents, ib.-G. W.
Steevens, 286.

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March: France's Love of False News,
420 Her Injustice to herself and
to others, 421 - The Uselessness of
Lies, 423 England's Discomfiture
Germany's Triumph, 425-Cambridge
in the Nineteenth Century, 426-The
Art of Amiable Biography, 427-The
University as Gunning knew it, 429-
The Dark Age of Scholarship, 430.

April: The Queen's Visit to her
People of London, 496-A peaceful
Conqueror, ib.-The Mob of Paris and
the Crowd of London, 497-The De-
struction of the Théâtre Français: A
European Disaster, 499-The Tradi-
tional Art of the French Drama, 500
-France's Power of Recovery, 503-
The New Edition of Lavengro,' ib.-
Dr Knapp's Indiscretion, 504.

May: The Attempt of Sipido, 688
-The Character of the Anarchist, ib.
-A sanguine foolish Victim of half-
knowledge, 690-Irresponsible Bio-
graphers, 692 - The Anarchists of
Literature, 693-A modest Coterie,
696-The Cult of Edward Fitzgerald,
ib. Tobias Smollett and his latest
Critic, 697.

June: Mr Pinero and his Critics,
837-A Plea for Freedom of Opinion,
ib.-The Royal Academy, 840-The
Folly of Exhibitions, ib.-The Relief
of Mafeking, 841-Delirious London,
ib.-An Orgie of Union-Jacks, ib.-
The late R. A. M. Stevenson, 843-
An Artist in Masquerade, ib. - The
Prodigality of Talk, 845.
NAMES OF PLACES, 527.

Native races in South Africa, future of
the, 159 et seq.

Navy, popular ignorance regarding the,

829.

NEW HISTORY OF SCOTLAND, the, 599.

NEW TROUT-FISHERIES, 256.

NEW ZEALAND, FROM A COUNTRY-HOUSE
IN, 220.

Night-attacks, risk of, in war, 300.
Nile, the, annual rise of, 247-improved
methods of irrigation by, 248-effects
of a low flood of, 249.
North-West Mounted Police, the, de-
parture of, for South Africa, 475 et
seq.-history of, 483 et seq.-official
duties of, 490.

ODD VOLUMES: III., 263.

Old Cock Tavern, reminiscences of the,
118.

OLD CRICKET, NEW LIGHT on, 780.
'Old London Taverns' by Edward Cal-
low, notice of, 111 et seq.

OLD TAVERN LIFE OF LONDON, THE,
110.

ON HER MAJESTY'S SERVICE, 551.
ONE OF THE OLD SCHOOL, 791.
Orange Republic, establishment of the,
150-friendliness of, towards England,

153.

OTHER DAYS, A LIGHT OF, 86.
OUR CAVALRY, CONCERNING, 767.
Oxford University, Sir John Mowbray
returned as member for, 31-instal-
lation of Lord Salisbury as Chancellor
of, 32-Commemoration Day at, 45-
address from, on her Majesty's Jubilee
of 1897, 47-portrait of Mr Gladstone
at, 52.

'Pamela,' change of taste regarding, 365.
Parliament, an opening of, by the Queen
in person, 26.

Parliamentary session of 1900, the, open-
ing of, 445-speeches of Lord Salisbury
and Mr Balfour at opening of, ib. et seq.
-and of Opposition leaders, 447-
lessons to be learnt from preliminary
debates of, 451 et seq. alarmist
speech of Lord Rosebery at commence-
ment of, 455.

PEACE, THE PROSPECTS OF, 585.
Place-names, origin of, 527 et seq.—sim-
plicity of, 529, 539-permanence of,
530-interesting results of the study
of, 531-part played by superstition
and religion in, 538.
PLACES, NAMES OF, 527.

PLAINS, THE RIDERS of the, 474.
POLITICAL PROSPECTS, SOUTH AFRICAN,
309.

Port Arthur, seizure of, by Russia, 462
et seq.

PROSPECTS OF PEACE, THE, 585.
RAILWAY MANAGEMENT, SOME PROB-
LEMS OF, 647.

Rainbow Tavern, Fleet Street, antiquity
of the, 122.

Reddersburg, the British disaster at,

736.

Reform Bill, Mr Gladstone's, debate on,

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