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SECTION II

EXPOSITIONS, FAIRS, AND CELEBRATIONS IN WHICH

THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA PARTICIPATED

GOLDEN GATE INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION

(San Francisco, California, 1939 and 1940)
United States Golden Gate International Exposition Commission:

The Secretary of Commerce, Chairman;
The Secretary of the Interior;
The Secretary of Agriculture;
The Secretary of Labor;
Clarence L. Lea, of California, Member of the House of Repre-

sentatives;
Franck R. Havenner, of California, Member of the House of Rep-

resentatives; Richard J. Welch, of California, Member of the House of Repre

sentatives; Sheridan Downey, of California, United States Senator; Key Pittman, LL.D., of Nevada, United States Senator; 1

Charles L. McNary, LL.D., of Oregon, United States Senator. United States Commissioner: George Creel, of California.

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Public Resolution 52, approved July 9, 1937 (50 Stat. 488), authorized the establishment of a commission to be known as the United States Golden Gate International Exposition Commission to represent the United States in connection with the holding of a world's fair in the city of San Francisco during the year 1939. The Exposition commemorated the completion of the San Francisco - Oakland Bridge and the Golden Gate Bridge and depicted and exhibited the progress and accomplishments of the Pacific area of the United States in science, industry, business, transportation, and culture. The resolution establishing the commission also authorized an appropriation of $1,500,000, which was to remain available until the termination of the commission, to carry out the purposes of the resolution. Public Act 354, 75th Congress (50 Stat. 755), appropriated the funds authorized

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1 Senator Pittman died on November 10, 1940.

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United States New York World's Fair Commission:

The Secretary of Agriculture, Chairman;
The Secretary of Commerce;
The Secretary of Labor;
Sol Bloom, of New York, Member of the House of Representa-

tives;
Matthew J. Merritt, of New York, Member of the House of Rep-

resentatives;
James W. Wadsworth, Jr., of New York, Member of the House of

Representatives;
James M. Mead, of New York, United States Senator;
Robert F. Wagner, of New York, United States Senator;

Wallace H. White, Jr., of Maine, United States Senator.
United States Commissioner General: Edward J. Flynn, of New

York.

Public Resolution 53, approved July 9, 1937 (50 Stat. 493), authorized the establishment of a commission to be known as the United States New York World's Fair Commission to represent the United States in connection with the holding of a world's fair in New York during the observance, in the year 1939, of the onehundred-and-fiftieth anniversary of the inauguration of the first President of the United States of America and of the establishment of the Federal Government in the city of New York. The resolution establishing the commission also authorized an appropriation of $3,000,000, which was to remain available until the termination of the commission, to carry out the purposes of the resolution. Public Act 354, 75th Congress (50 Stat. 755), appropriated the funds authorized.

Public Resolution 72, approved May 14, 1940 (54 Stat. 215), amended the above acts and authorized the appropriation of

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Public 186, approved July 17, 1939 (53 Stat. 1047), authorized the establishment of the United States Coronado Exposition Commission for the purpose of representing the United States in connection with the holding of an exposition and celebrations during the observances and commemoration of the four-hundredth anniversary of the explorations of Francisco Vasquez de Coronado in the States of Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas.

Under this act there was also authorized to be appropriated the sum of $250,000 for the purpose of carrying out the provisions thereof. Subject to the provisions of this act, the Commission was authorized to make any expenditures or allotments deemed necessary by it to fulfil properly the purposes of the act, including the expenditure of not to exceed $10,000 for the erection of a suitable monument at or near the point on the international boundary between the United States and Mexico where Coronado first entered what is now the United States, and to allocate such additional sums as the Commission might deem necessary and proper in carrying out the pur

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*Mr. Dempsey was appointed Commissioner, United States Maritime Commission, on January 3, 1941.

Mr. Dickens succeeded Mr. Clinton P. Anderson, of New Mexico, who resigned as Managing Director on August 23, 1940. In April 1941, Mr. Dickens resigned as Managing Director.

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poses of this act for (1) the erection of monuments; (2) the erection and enlargement of museum facilities for the housing of historical and anthropological material and material illustrative of the arts and crafts of such States; (3) the preparation and publication of historical pamphlets; and (4) assistance in defraying any other expenses incurred in properly observing and commemorating such anniversary.

Public 361, approved August 9, 1939 (53 Stat. 1307), appropriated the sum of $200,000 for all expenses necessary to carry out the provisions of the above-mentioned act.

Inasmuch as Francisco Vasquez de Coronado and his expedition did not reach the territory which has since become the States of Oklahoma and Kansas until the year following his exploration of the others, those two States made arrangements to celebrate the anniversary in 1941 instead of 1940.

Commissions were set up in the various States to cooperate with the Federal Commission and to stage Coronado shows called the "Entrada”. During the fiscal year 1941 five of these pictorial representations, in pageant form, of the entry of Coronado were held in Kansas.

CENTENNIAL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF EL SALVADOR

(San Salvador, El Salvador, February 16–18, 1941) Representative: Robert Frazer, American Minister to El Salvador.

The Centennial, which was held from February 16 to 18, 1941, commemorated the hundredth anniversary of the Salvadoran University. The following countries were represented by government or university delegates: Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, and United States of America. Mr. Gerhard Gade, Secretary of Legation, San Salvador, was the delegate of Harvard University. The National Legislative Assembly of El Salvador declared these three days national holidays, and a special set of postage stamps was issued to commemorate the event.

During the meetings held on these days, honorary diplomas were awarded, scientific treatises were read by prominent doctors, and busts of the founders of the university were unveiled. The celebrations concluded with an al-fresco show written and acted by students of the university.

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The Cape Spartel Light was built in 1864 by the Moroccan Government on the coast of Morocco, at the southwesterly entrance to the Strait of Gibraltar, where many vessels had been wrecked.

The important position of the light, especially for signaling purposes in time of war, actuated the foreign governments represented at Morocco to arrange for a guaranty as to the permanent neutrality of the lighthouse. The Moroccan Government was willing to accept such an arrangement provided the foreign governments most interested were willing to take charge of and maintain the light.

As a consequence the treaty of May 31, 1865, proclaimed by the President of the United States of America, March 12, 1867, provided for the participation of the United States in the maintenance of this light.

The control of the lighthouse is vested in the International Commission for the Maintenance of the Cape Spartel Light, composed of the diplomatic and consular representatives of the treaty powers in Tangier.

Money for the contribution of the United States toward the upkeep of the lighthouse from 1867 to 1871 was obtained by drawing on the banker of the United States in London. The first congressional

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* Treaty Series 245 ; 14 Stat. 679.

Mr. Childs was assigned as First Secretary and Consul at Tangier on December 23, 1940, and succeeded Mr. John Campbell White as American Member of the International Commission. Mr. White held the position of Diplomatic Agent and Consul General, Tangier, from June 19, 1940 to November 29, 1940.

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