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that watch-tower one of the others live as we will. You want these pointed to a little darkling planet phalansteries, these houses on the hanging upon the skirts of space, hills ! prisons and bondage. What half seen amid the glory of the need ye, beyond what we have ?" greater stars. “That speck,” he The

young man leaned

over,

the said, "is what we called the Earth, great wind playing with him, as if and bragged of as something great it subdued its force not to carry and wonderful in our time. Look away this light and petty scrap at it, contemptible ! dim with of being. And stretching out his smokes and fogs, and the breath hands, he said, “What we wantof toiling men.”

it is God and Love." “ Yet it was our mother,” said This he said, not so much out of the young man,

" and there we his own heart, as because there lived, and there we died." was something of that in him which

“If you call that, the throes of poets have. And being so, he the birth - hour, living: and the knew that it was true. And the journey hither dying-trifling in- spirits round him murmured and cidents of our career. It was the sobbed and repeated, “God and same voice which had first accosted Love." And the others were silent him when he arrived in that world and said no word. which now spoke, and there were He went back afterwards to his many with him, the elder spirits : living place in the wood, which he while with the young man

had come to love because it was many of the new-comers, still sore near the home of those who were and wounded to feel themselves his; and a number of those wandropped out of everything, and derers went with him, talking of humbled to feel that they were but what he had said and of what was voices, and no longer men and in their hearts. “We thought it women as of old. And they turned was here we should have found with the young man as he stretched Him," they said ; we thought out his arms, leaning on the para- that to come hither was all that pet, unto the wide and whirling was wanted. Tell us, thou ! has world of space.

He failed? We were never His “Oh little earth !” he said, “full servants, yet we believed that He of vapour and smoke and the would save us at the end." thoughts of men, rising up to " This is not the end—it is but heaven. At least we were some- the beginning,”the young man said. thing then, not nothing: and dear “And will He save us, will He Love was there, and all the hopes save us—at the end ?” The voices of God.”

all together were like a blast of “Why not now also—why not weeping wind. now ?” said something, that was Then the young man turned but a tremble and a quiver by his upon them and cried, “What are side. Because," said the elder we? what are we? Let us perish spirit, we need not these ancient if He will, but He be all in all !” visions. Free souls are we in This he said because of somethe world of thought, despising all thing that had come into him he that is below, knowing nothing knew not how: he felt it and that is above. What do ye mur- obeyed its impulse, but knew not mur at, ye crew? What would ye why. For still the first thing in have, insatiate souls? The uni- his own heart, as in theirs, was verse is ours to admire and to to be saved—to be once more a enjoy. We go where we will, we man in His image, and no longer a

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wandering ghost unclothed. To be for ever moving in that sublime and to be seen of his fellows, and to circle around the unseen throne; speak with other men—even if it and this world in which he was should bring pain and sorrow; for swaying softly turning toward the sorrow and pain are higher things highest Light. And he said to than to be nothing, though at your himself what one had said thousease and free as the wind.

ands of years ago—a shepherd-boy He sat all that night through under the starry heavens—“What on his favourite mound, thinking is man that Thou art mindful of and pondering within himself; him ?" And it seemed to him and as he thought of all he had that he himself, about whom he seen and the great Universe that had been spending SO many had opened upon him at the height thoughts, murmuring because of of that watch-tower, the wondrous his losses, and convulsing all the circle of the stars, and all the quiet wood with longings after mysteries of being which hung another state-he himself, who had upon His breath who made them, been the centre of the world to he began to understand what he him, was indeed nothing, no more himself had said, and his eyes than a drop of dew or a blade of grew wet as when he had seen the grass in the great Universe of Lord pass and his heart bad fought God. And he cried out, but softly, with him to get free to fling itself to the One that hears all things, in the Master's path. He had “Be Thou ! for ever and ever! and held it back then, but not now. let me be nothing, for nothing I He looked up to the skies above But Thou, be Thou, supreme him, and saw those glorious worlds and all in all !”

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In the glory of the morning the He could not rest where he was young man awoke, for even in the on so happy a morning, but went solemnity of his act, giving up forth and visited all the wood, as everything, even hope if the Lord one visits one's friends when there so willed, he had been surprised is a great rejoicing to see that by that human sweetness of sleep they are rejoicing too. which was not necessary to his

åt last he found himself upon state of being, yet delightful as that pleasant knoll from which he the dew when it came, refreshing could see the whole valley lying the soul. There was never any- in a rapture under the joyful thing but fair weather in that light; and he saw that there world, yet it seemed to him when was much movement in the town he opened his eyes that no day near him, and once

more faces had ever been so fair as this; and at all the windows, and white he asked himself, Was it perhaps figures looking over the parapet Easter or some great holiday, of of the ascent where he had gone which he had lost count in the up, but had not been admitted. passing of the years and the days? They were looking then for some Everything shone and glistened one, some one who would be of and sent forth breathings of de- his kindred ; and it would be an light under the shining of the sun, event for him as well as for them, and the whole world was gay, and and perhaps even he would gain every drop of dew was like another something-a companion, a friend. perfect world of joy and blessing. But he stopped these thoughts while they were in his mind, and Not for him, not for him, was tried to think what it would be to this delight, to meet his brother him if the new-comer was received and fall upon his neck, and ask a where he had not been receivedthousand things of home! To and came as a man in the body look on was all that was permitwhich God gave—to be among the ted to him. Why should he go, others, not banished into nothing- who was nothing, who could not ness. For a long time he was in take his hand, or show his face doubt, for no one came up the as- where those were who were the cending path except those whom he people of the Lord ? He sank knew, whose business it was, and down upon his knoll, and covered he looked in vain for a stranger; his face with his hands, and heard and there began to rise in his heart the tumult of glad voices, and the a half hope half fear that he for welcomes and shouts of joy with whom they were all looking should which the wayfarer was taken in. come as he himself bad done—in- He listened to every word, while visible : : a voice only, and no man. the voices streamed up the steep as

But lo! while he watched there cent and the stranger was brought came forth from the silver line with rejoicing to his father's house. of the great highway a single Was he glad too? Was there a figure, of one who sang as he came pang in his heart, thinking that -not in haste, but almost slowly, these welcomes had been prepared standing still and looking round for him too, till it was discovered him from time to time, as if the what he was ? His voice, which beauty of the world was so sweet was all he had, seemed choked in to him that he could not go on, his throat. He could not speak, then turning his face towards the he could not cry. Vanity of vanitown and proceeding upon his ties, nothing of nothingness! even way. The young man put out his voice went from him, and he his hands, and suddenly clasped was no more than a thought. them together, and gazed in a Thus it was that he did not see, suspense upon which his whole because he could not look : but being seemed to hang.

heard every sound and the foothe, it was be! He had known steps on the stones, and the shouts the outline against the light while from above and the

songs

beit was still but a shadow; he had low. When they died away he recognised every footstep, and the felt in the bitterness of his heart as turn of the head, and every line if he had been again shut out, as and every movement. Ob, how if it had been the day of his first easy to know those who are one's refusal; but, more bitter still, shut own, however far off !—the familiar out, and for ever shut out, and gesture, the little movement that never again to hold converse with is nothing, that a stranger would his kin and rejoice with them.

He sprang up to rush For what should he rejoice? That down the hill and meet him, call- he was shut out, and that the ing his name, and reflecting that open gates were barred against even those at the gate, though they him, and only him? But at least were there to welcome him, could they might have let him share not know him as he did. But his the joy that his brother bad come feet were as rooted to the soil, and and was more happy than he. He he sank down again with a sob in sprang up and turned away, still his bogom, and a strong pang that covering his face, that he might seemed to rend him in twain. not see those walls and towers

It was

never see.

wandering ghost unclothed. To be for ever moving in that sublime and to be seen of his fellows, and to circle around the unseen throne; speak with other men—even if it and this world in which he was should bring pain and sorrow; for swaying softly turning toward the sorrow and pain are higher things highest Light. And he said to than to be nothing, though at your himself what one had said thousease and free as the wind.

ands of years ago—a shepherd-boy He sat all that night through under the starry heavens- -"What on his favourite mound, thinking is man that Thou art mindful of and pondering within himself; him ?” And it seemed to him and as he thought of all he had that he himself, about whom he seen and the great Universe that had been spending so many had opened upon him at the height thoughts, murmuring because of of that watch-tower, the wondrous his losses, and convulsing all the circle of the stars, and all the quiet wood with longings after mysteries of being which hung another state—he himself, who had upon His breath who made them, been the centre of the world to he began to understand what he him, was indeed nothing, no more himself had said, and his eyes than a drop of dew or a blade of grew wet as when he had seen the grass in the great Universe of Lord pass and his heart had fought God. And he cried out, but softly, with him to get free to fling itself to the One that hears all things, in the Master's path. He had “ Be Thou ! for ever and ever! and held it back then, but not now. let me be nothing, for nothing I He looked up to the skies above

But Thou, be Thou, supreme him, and saw those glorious worlds and all in all!”

am.

V.

In the glory of the morning the He could not rest where he was young man awoke, for even in the

on so happy a morning, but went solemnity of his act, giving up forth and visited all the wood, as everything, even hope if the Lord one visits one's friends when there so willed, he had been surprised is a great rejoicing to see that by that human sweetness of sleep they are rejoicing too. which was not necessary to his

At last he found himself upon state of being, yet delightful as that pleasant knoll from which he the dew when it came, refreshing could see the whole valley lying the soul. There was never any in a rapture under the joyful thing but fair weather in that light; and he saw that there world, yet it seemed to him when was much movement in the town he opened his eyes that no day near him, and once

more faces had ever been so fair as this; and at all the windows, and white he asked himself, Was it perhaps figures looking over the parapet Easter or some great holiday, of of the ascent where he had gone which he had lost count in the up, but had not been admitted. passing of the years and the days? They were looking then for some Everything shone and glistened one, some one who would be of and sent forth breathings of de- his kindred; and it would be an light under the shining of the sun, event for him as well as for them, and the whole world was gay, and and perhaps even he would gain every drop of dew was like another something-a companion, a friend. perfect world of joy and blessing. But he stopped these thoughts while they were in bis mind, and Not for him, not for him, was tried to think what it would be to this delight, to meet his brother him if the new-comer was received and fall upon his neck, and ask a where he had not been received, thousand things of home! To and came as a man in the body look on was all that was permitwhich God gave—to be among the ted to him. Why should he go, others, not banished into nothing- who was nothing, who could not ness. For a long time he was in take his hand, or show his face doubt, for no one came up the as- where those were who were the cending path except those whom he people of the Lord ? He sank knew, whose business it was, and down upon his knoll, and covered he looked in vain for a stranger; his face with his hands, and heard and there began to rise in his heart the tumult of glad voices, and the a half hope half fear that he for welcomes and shouts of joy with whom they were all looking should which the wayfarer was taken in. come as he himself bad done—in- He listened to every word, while visible: a voice only, and no man. the voices streamed up the steep as

But lo! while he watched there cent and the stranger was brought came forth from the silver line with rejoicing to his father's house. of the great highway a single Was he glad too? Was there a figure, of one who sang as he came pang in his heart, thinking that —not in haste, but almost slowly, these welcomes had been prepared standing still and looking round for him too, till it was discovered him from time to time, as if the what he was ? His voice, which beauty of the world was so sweet was all he had, seemed choked in to him that he could not go on, his throat. He could not speak, then turning his face towards the he could not cry. Vanity of vanitown and proceeding upon his ties, nothing of nothingness ! even way. The young man put out his voice went from him, and he his hands, and suddenly clasped was no more than a thought. them together, and gazed in a Thus it was that he did not see, suspense upon which his whole because he could not look : but being seemed to hang. It was heard every sound and the foothe, it was he! He had known steps on the stones, and the shouts the outline against the light while from above and the songs

beit was still but a shadow; he had low. When they died away he recognised every footstep, and the felt in the bitterness of his heart as turn of the head, and every line if he had been again shut out, as and every movement. Oh how if it had been the day of his first easy to know those who are one's refusal ; but, more bitter still, shut own, however far off !--the familiar out, and for ever shut out, and gesture, the little movement that never again to hold converse with is nothing, that a stranger would his kin and rejoice with them. never see. He sprang up to rush For what should he rejoice? That down the hill and meet him, call- he was shut out, and that the ing his name, and reflecting that open gates were barred against even those at the gate, though they him, and only him? But at least were there to welcome him, could they might have let him share not know him as he did. But his the joy that his brother had come feet were as rooted to the soil, and and was more bappy than he. He he sank down again with a sob in sprang up and turned away, still his bosom, and a strong pang that covering his face, that he might seemed to rend him in twain. not see those walls and towers

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