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while they were in his mind, and Not for him, not for him, was tried to think what it would be to this delight, to meet his brother bim if the new-comer was received and fall upon his neck, and ask a where he had not been received, thousand things of home! To and came as a man in the body look on was all that was permit which God gave—to be among the ted to him. Why should he go, others, not banished into nothing- who was nothing, who could not ness. For a long time he was in take his hand, or show his face doubt, for no one came up the as- where those were who were the cending path except those whom he people of the Lord ? He sank knew, whose business it was, and down upon his knoll, and covered he looked in vain for a stranger; his face with his hands, and heard and there began to rise in his heart the tumult of glad voices, and the a half hope half fear that he for welcomes and shouts of joy with whom they were all looking sbould which the wayfarer was taken in. come as he himself had done—in- He listened to every word, while visible: a voice only, and no man. the voices streamed up the steep as

But lo! while he watched there cent and the stranger was brought came forth from the silver line with rejoicing to his father's house. of the great highway a single Was he glad too? Was there a figure, of one who sang as he came pang in his heart, thinking that -not in haste, but almost slowly, these welcomes had been prepared standing still and looking round for him too, till it was discovered him from time to time, as if the what he was ? His voice, which beauty of the world was so sweet was all he had, seemed choked in to him that he could not go on, his throat. He could not speak, then turning his face towards the he could not cry. Vanity of vanitown and proceeding upon his ties, nothing of nothingness ! even way. The young man put out his voice went from him, and he his bands, and suddenly clasped was no more than a thought.

, them together, and gazed in a Thus it was that he did not see, suspense upon which his whole because he could not look : but being seemed to hang.

heard every sound and the foothe, it was be! He had known steps on the stones, and the shouts the outline against the light while from above and the songs

beit was still but a shadow ; he had low. When they died away he recognised every footstep, and the felt in the bitterness of his heart as turn of the head, and every line if he had been again shut out, as and every movement. Ob, how if it had been the day of his first easy to know those who are one's refusal; but, more bitter still, shut own, however far off !—the familiar out, and for ever shut out, and gesture, the little movement that never again to hold converse with is nothing, that a stranger would his kin and rejoice with them.

He sprang up to rush For what should he rejoice? That down the hill and meet him, call- he was shut out, and that the ing his name, and reflecting that open gates were barred against even those at the gate, though they him, and only him? But at least were there to welcome him, could they might have let him sbare not know him as he did. But his the joy that his brother bad come feet were as rooted to the soil, and and was more bappy than he. He he sank down again with a sob in sprang up and turned away, still his bosom, and a strong pang that covering his face, that he might seemed to rend him in twain. not see those walls and towers

It was

never see.

wandering ghost unclothed. To be for ever moving in that sublime and to be seen of his fellows, and to circle around the unseen throne; speak with other men—even if it and this world in which he was should bring pain and sorrow; for swaying softly turning toward the sorrow and pain are higher things highest Light. And he said to than to be nothing, though at your himself what one had said thousease and free as the wind.

ands of years ago—a shepherd-boy He sat all that night through under the starry heavens- -"What on his favourite mound, thinking is man that Thou art mindful of and pondering within himself; him ?” And it seemed to him and as he thought of all he had that he himself, about whom he seen and the great Universe that had been spending so many had opened upon him at the height thoughts, murmuring because of of that watch-tower, the wondrous his losses, and convulsing all the circle of the stars, and all the quiet wood with longings after mysteries of being which hung another state—he himself, who had upon His breath who made them, been the centre of the world to he began to understand what he him, was indeed nothing, no more himself had said, and his eyes than a drop of dew or a blade of grew wet as when he had seen the grass in the great Universe of Lord pass and his heart had fought God. And he cried out, but softly, with him to get free to fling itself to the One that hears all things, in the Master's path. He had “ Be Thou ! for ever and ever! and held it back then, but not now. let me be nothing, for nothing I He looked up to the skies above

But Thou, be Thou, supreme him, and saw those glorious worlds and all in all!”

am.

V.

In the glory of the morning the He could not rest where he was young man awoke, for even in the

on so happy a morning, but went solemnity of his act, giving up forth and visited all the wood, as everything, even hope if the Lord one visits one's friends when there so willed, he had been surprised is a great rejoicing to see that by that human sweetness of sleep they are rejoicing too. which was not necessary to his

At last he found himself upon state of being, yet delightful as that pleasant knoll from which he the dew when it came, refreshing could see the whole valley lying the soul. There was never any in a rapture under the joyful thing but fair weather in that light; and he saw that there world, yet it seemed to him when was much movement in the town he opened his eyes that no day near him, and once

more faces had ever been so fair as this; and at all the windows, and white he asked himself, Was it perhaps figures looking over the parapet Easter or some great holiday, of of the ascent where he had gone which he had lost count in the up, but had not been admitted. passing of the years and the days? They were looking then for some Everything shone and glistened one, some one who would be of and sent forth breathings of de- his kindred; and it would be an light under the shining of the sun, event for him as well as for them, and the whole world was gay, and and perhaps even he would gain every drop of dew was like another something-a companion, a friend. perfect world of joy and blessing. But he stopped these thoughts while they were in bis mind, and Not for him, not for him, was tried to think what it would be to this delight, to meet his brother him if the new-comer was received and fall upon his neck, and ask a where he had not been received, thousand things of home! To and came as a man in the body look on was all that was permitwhich God gave—to be among the ted to him. Why should he go, others, not banished into nothing- who was nothing, who could not ness. For a long time he was in take his hand, or show his face doubt, for no one came up the as- where those were who were the cending path except those whom he people of the Lord ? He sank knew, whose business it was, and down upon his knoll, and covered he looked in vain for a stranger; his face with his hands, and heard and there began to rise in his heart the tumult of glad voices, and the a half hope half fear that he for welcomes and shouts of joy with whom they were all looking should which the wayfarer was taken in. come as he himself bad done—in- He listened to every word, while visible: a voice only, and no man. the voices streamed up the steep as

But lo! while he watched there cent and the stranger was brought came forth from the silver line with rejoicing to his father's house. of the great highway a single Was he glad too? Was there a figure, of one who sang as he came pang in his heart, thinking that —not in haste, but almost slowly, these welcomes had been prepared standing still and looking round for him too, till it was discovered him from time to time, as if the what he was ? His voice, which beauty of the world was so sweet was all he had, seemed choked in to him that he could not go on, his throat. He could not speak, then turning his face towards the he could not cry. Vanity of vanitown and proceeding upon his ties, nothing of nothingness ! even way. The young man put out his voice went from him, and he his hands, and suddenly clasped was no more than a thought. them together, and gazed in a Thus it was that he did not see, suspense upon which his whole because he could not look : but being seemed to hang. It was heard every sound and the foothe, it was he! He had known steps on the stones, and the shouts the outline against the light while from above and the songs

beit was still but a shadow; he had low. When they died away he recognised every footstep, and the felt in the bitterness of his heart as turn of the head, and every line if he had been again shut out, as and every movement. Oh how if it had been the day of his first easy to know those who are one's refusal ; but, more bitter still, shut own, however far off !--the familiar out, and for ever shut out, and gesture, the little movement that never again to hold converse with is nothing, that a stranger would his kin and rejoice with them. never see. He sprang up to rush For what should he rejoice? That down the hill and meet him, call- he was shut out, and that the ing his name, and reflecting that open gates were barred against even those at the gate, though they him, and only him? But at least were there to welcome him, could they might have let him share not know him as he did. But his the joy that his brother had come feet were as rooted to the soil, and and was more bappy than he. He he sank down again with a sob in sprang up and turned away, still his bosom, and a strong pang that covering his face, that he might seemed to rend him in twain. not see those walls and towers

a

into the heart of which the joy never had been closed against him, of welcome had swept, and were and the love that had been his all now but faintly heard—and went his life. And then there came quickly away and hid himself upon him suddenlyanother thought, in the heart of the wood : not at the coming of which his heart in his accustomed place, — partly stood still, and strained upon all because his heart was sick of all its chords as if it would sink away that lived and breathed about from him: and he fell upon his him, and partly in perversity, that knees and lifted up his head and they might not find him when cried with an awful cry, “God! the they came to search for him, as mother, the mother!" And the he knew they were sure to do. far distant earth seemed to roll up Ah! why was this? why was this, under his vision and open, and that an event which was so joyful show a house desolate and a woman should throw him back, back into who sat within. And he who was the abyss from which his soul had himself desolate, yet within sight escaped ? He had escaped from of the joy, forgot himself and himself; he had consented to be everything that was his, to think nothing, and to know that he was of her. The mother, the mother! nothing—that it was not for him he flung himself on his face, he

— that heaven and earth should be rose again to his feet, he stood and disturbed, as if an atom was to held out his hands to God, calling make so much commotion for its to him and repeating His name, own wellbeing ; but now this atom “God ! God !” and then “Father!” once again blotted out both God if, perbaps, that might reach him and Heaven.

better. “For now she is alone,” He struggled manfully in his he cried. And then in his trouble heart to come to an end. “I he reproached the Most High God, know," he said to himself, “that and cried out,

" Thou

are not it was not fit that I who had alone; Thou hast Thy Son.” And sinned should be rewarded. I have he forgot all his trouble and comcome to little harm. I suffer noth- plaining, and became all one prayer, ing. I have the whole world left, one cry for another, for one who more beautiful than heart had con- was desolate and had now no child. ceived. And once in a thousand Then straight like an arrow from years the Lord will pass by, and a bow he went away, leaving his I shall see Him, even if it be no wood and the home of his kindred,

And they will all come to and the valley, hastening he knew comfort me and talk to me, and not where. For in his heart he not forget me—and my brother felt that there must be some way,

But he did not say my some place in which he could brother. He said a name; and reach the footstool of the great at the sound of that name a great Father, and pray to be forgotten sobbing seized him, and the recol- and blotted out for ever, rather lection of so many things that than that she should be left to were past, and the home that weep alone.

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VI.

It was close to one of those great foam, built of white marble and of bridges by which the Lord passed alabaster, and every line marked to the other worlds around,- with fine gold, which sometimes bridge that rose light as the sea- shone as if with jewels, and some

a

:

his cry.

times seemed to melt away in the living too, and moving ceaselessly clouds as if it had not been ; but from east to west through all the whether it was built of the stones brilliant hours of the day; and of the earth, or whether of vapours during the night a great vision of and cloud, flung itself boldly across stars was in the place where the the abyss, and bore the army and lights should be, like silver lamps the attendants of the Lord whenever upon the altar, and in the lofty He came.

And near to this place, fragrant roof, where the leaves where the broad highway seemed trembled and glistened : and its itself to march and continue along floor was made of living flowers the bridge, there was a cathedral throwing up their fragrance, which in the wood. The young man had was sweeter than incense : and heard of it from many. It was by day by day it lived and grew, this great temple that those others pushing higher and higher towards passed who preserved their being the skies, straight and tall and as men: and those who were but strong, reaching upward like the Voices moaned and lamented often, living thing it was.

The sunsaying that they had missed the set was still upon the western way. But it was not for this, nor front, and streaming upon the indeed knowingly at all, that the great doorway, which was ever young man made his way here: open, and wreathed in every climbbut only in the height of his an- ing thing that blows, the long guish, that he might find some holy branches clinging one to another place where God might listen to to find a place, and the flowers

thickening and clustering upon The day had come towards its the holy arch in an eagerness to end, and the glory of the sunset be there : and there was a sound lit up the white and glorious within of noble music and choirs bridge which spanned the air and unseen, which sang their hymns of clouds, and disappeared into a praise to God both through the mystery of the unseen such as night and in the day. no eyes of man could penetrate The young man went in withor trace, to the other side. The out a pause, thinking neither of young man did not pause to look the beautiful place nor of the at this wonder of the world, but strangeness of it, but only that it turned aside to the temple in the was the temple not made with wood. His footsteps were drawn hands, where the Lord loved to towards it, he scarcely knew how: pause on his journey, and where but until he saw it he knew not the great Father came to comthat this was that Temple of which mune with His Son, and which he had heard. But of that great the ever-living Spirit had chosen cathedral what tongue can tell ? for a place to dwell in: alfor it was not built by hands, nor though not in this place or any were its arches created and its other was that great Presence pillars put into their place by any bound, but might be called upon workman, whether mortal or im- by every path, and even in the mortal; for where it stood it grew common highroad where all men with its feet in the living soil, and went to and fro. The young man every column a living tree straight did not remember except in a and noble, and the vault above confusion what it was he had woven of foliage, which changed heard of the cathedral in the and moved with every breath, and wood, nor knew he why he came, let in the changings of the light, except with a thought that it was

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