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tion of the mystery which sur- courtesy of manner much struck my rounded his death.

boyish observation. All were happy, They were married on the 5th and the ship may be said to have November 1828; and for nearly the sailors she was known as the

been thoroughly comfortable.' By two years Franklin took a well- Celestial Rainbow, Franklin's earned rest from active service-a

Paradise.” rest which was nevertheless not of his own choosing, for he submitted In connection with the unfortua plan for yet another Arctic ex- nate squabble in which he afterpedition, only to find that the wards became mixed up in TasAdmiralty "did not intend to mania this fact is of interest, as recommend any more Northern is also his complete success in the expeditions to his Majesty's Gov- far from easy political duties which ernment.” It was not till the his command in Greek waters for summer of 1830 that congenial nearly three years involved. In employment again offered itself in acknowledgment of his services he the shape of the command of was made Knight Commander of H.M.S. Rainbow. This time he the Guelphic Order of Hanover on was called upon to change his rôle reaching home, while King Otho of explorer for that of diplomat; of Greece conferred upon him the for this it was that his command Cross of the Order of the Reas senior naval officer in Greece deemer. during the War of Liberation We would gladly have welcomed practically amounted to, in days in Mr Traill's volume a larger numwhen a freer hand was given ber of extracts from Franklin's own and telegraphs were non-existent. letters, for of these he bas given us With this period of his life Mr but few. The subject of a bioTraill deals at great, and we think graphy often tells his own story quite unnecessary, length ; for the best, and though we are not among affair was of very secondary im- those who believe that the letters portance, the incidents of interest of a man necessarily afford the rare, and the mass of detail with best clue to his mind and habit of which we are presented of a more thought, they often reveal phases than common dulness. Two things, of character not otherwise evident. however, forcibly present them- Perhaps Mr Traill would plead selves to the reader's mind — the that Sir John was less interesting extreme popularity of the Rain- as a correspondent than as an exbow's captain, and the general plorer. And, indeed, it must be happiness and concord which pre- confessed that his letters, so far vailed among all ranks throughout at least as the writer of these the cruise. One who was then on pages is acquainted with them, board as cadet" volunteer of the are abnormally serious, and read first class," as they were then called as if too much care had been taken -speaks to the same effect in a to "seek the choice word and letter to the present writer :- measured phrase,” though it must

be remembered that this was in * The ship was in first-rate order, great part a marked feature of having a very smart 1st lieutenant, letters of that period. Those who and I well remember how much

look for anecdote, too, in Mr respected and beloved was Sir John by all on board. He entertained his Traill’s ‘Life' will meet with officers a good deal at dinner, and disappointment. Disraeli, howhis kindness to them as well as his ever, with whose family both

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Franklin and his wife were in- dark curls, leaning dejectedly timate, forms the subject of the against one of the pillars of the following sketch from the latter's porch." It was Disraeli on his pen :

wedding tour! The sight of his “Young D'Israeli's follies on board friends aroused him sufficiently the Hermes are of a piece with his

to enable him to disclose his tale and his companions' conduct here two of woe. Either owing to the years ago. They are quite a by-word charms of his bride or the monoat Corfu, the names of D'Israeli

, Clay, tony of the scenery he had failed and Meredith never being mentioned but to be laughed at. They apolo- hours he had been retracing his

to recognise the fact that for some gised for being too late for dinner, because the scenery of the island did steps instead of proceeding in the not enable them to think of such direction of Innsbruck as he had things ; accepted with hesitation an intended, and had reached the invitation to one of the regimental post-house only to find no horses messes, saying it was a trying thing available for his return. The joke to dine at à mess; avowed their lost nothing, moreover, by the utter inability to dine in anything but additional fact that they had a large room, and with Sir Frederick Adam, ... behaved as if they thought every reason to suppose that the their host was a very insignificant mistake had taken place in dupliperson indeed compared with them- cate, and that another couple, deselves. Mr Clay wore long ringlets sirous of reaching Augsburg, were down his cheeks, and was dressed in at that moment speeding on their a complete suit of blue lined with

return journey to Innsbruck ! velvet, with blue buttons and blue

Our letter does not relate the spurs !”

further adventures of the unlucky It is more probable, as Mr Traill travellers. suggests, that there is a mistake That the period of idleness here, and that for Mr Clay Lady which fell to Franklin's lot at Franklin meant to have written the completion of his service in Disraeli.

Greece was irksome to him it A letter from Disraeli at a hardly needs the evidence of his much later period, quoted on p. letters to show. During his com276, although not in other ways mission the Government had again of particular interest, conceals & revived their designs of Arctic exrather ludicrous incident which ploration, and though it was only that statesman was hardly likely natural that in his absence the himself to reveal, and which Mr command of the expedition-which Traill is probably unacquainted had in view the survey of the with. It mentions the fact of his N.E. portion of North Americameeting Sir John's father-in-law should be given to Back, his letters on the road between Augsburg evince the fear that he might be and Munich, without further re- dropping out of the ranks as far mark. But we have another letter as Arctic work was

concerned. sous la main which gives the in- “We may rest assured," he writes, cident in full. Mr Griffin and "that there will be no more landhis daughter, Lady Simpkinson journey after Back's return." But travelling voiturier, and halting though his forecast was in this to rest the horses at a post-house respect incorrect, and though the some hours from Munich, suddenly latter navigator's success in his became aware of “a most discon- discovery of the Great Fish River solate - looking figure with long led again to an Arctic commission,

VOL. CLXI.—NO. DCCCCLXXVI.

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the Government ceased for a time marked features of his character. their work in this direction, and One of that enviable class whose it became evident that if Franklin fortune it is to be without enemies, sought employment at all, it must he had had little experience even be of another kind. It was at of the lesser but perhaps more trythis juncture that Lord Glenelg ing evil of an uncongenial and offered him the Governorship of cantankerous coadjutor. This was Antigua, proceeding in thoroughly to be his portion, however, in Tascharacteristic official fashion, as mania, and there is no doubt that Mr Traill puts it, “to ascertain his six years' reign in that colony what was the most unimportant must always have been remembered post that the aforesaid distin- by him as the most distasteful guished officer could be prevailed period of his life. upon to accept." But Franklin, It is not necessary to dwell though modest enough by nature, upon the history of these unon learning that it was only a fortunate squabbles, and it is to subordinate post, and that he be regretted, we think, that Mr would not be responsible directly Traill should have devoted such to the Colonial Office, recognised an inordinate array of pages to that there were occasions upon them; for in the public mind no which it was no sin se faire valoir, odium ever attached to Franklin, and declined. His refusal was and no question of clearing his characteristically sailor-like. "I character therefore presents itself.

told him," he writes to his wife, Captain Mackonochie, the Goverdescribing his interview with Lord nor's private secretary, was a perGlenelg,

" that it seemed to me son with “humanitarian views" little more than being 1st lieu- upon the subject of convicts, who tenant of a ship of the line." combined with his duties the rep

That he was wise in refusing resentation of an English society there could be no doubt, for with- “for the improvement of penal in a fortnight he was offered the discipline." Mr Montagu, the Governorship of Tasmania, a post Colonial Secretary, was what is of such importance that, however termed in sailor - language a seamuch he might have preferred an lawyer, and was not above secretly Arctic command, he could not do using the colonial Press in disloyal otherwise than accept it.

. In depreciation of his chief. Franklin January 1837 he landed with his was a man who regarded loyalty family at Hobart, and commenced and obedience — not only in the his duties.

letter but the spirit—as his unHitherto Franklin's lines had questionable due. Add to these on the whole been cast in pleasant factors the existence of the bitterplaces. Privation, indeed, he had est and most acrimonious dissenknown in its direst form, and sions in smaller official circles, and suffering such as needed the ex- a Press unrivalled for its scurriltremest fortitude of a brave man ity, and we have all the necessary to endure; but he had always been ingredients, it must be owned, for at peace

with his fellow-men. We a quarrel of the first class. Such have seen how beloved he was on a quarrel, in fact, occurred. Capthe Rainbow with officers and men tain Mackonochie found employalike, and this power of gaining ment elsewhere, and Mr Montagu the affection of his comrades seems was suspended from office, but to have been one of the most against the enmity of Lord Stanof.

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ley Franklin had no remedy. months, and many persons who have Upon whichever side the right been in other colonies have said that may have been, it is certain that never was a Governor more beloved,

and whose departure was more deeply the treatment he received at the hands of the Colonial Office was

deplored. The whole town turned out

to accompany him to the vessel. not only unjust, but unheard Never, it is said, has there been a

He was superseded by Sir larger concourse in the island.” Eardley Wilmot, who arrived, totally unexpectedly, by the same

Nor is this merely the ex parte ship that brought out the despatch statement of a devoted daughter, acquainting Franklin for the first as is evident from the shoals of time of his supersession. Mr

letters and addresses which poured Traill remarks that, though Lord in from every class of society. Stanley did many remarkable

Among all these worries and things in his life besides taking trials of official life, one incident his famous political “leap in the occurred which must have cheered dark,” one may well doubt whether Franklin on his path and revived he ever rivalled the feat of appoint- with double strength all his longing a Colonial Governor to fill a

ings for a return to his work of chair which had not yet been Polar exploration—the visit of vacated :

Ross to Hobart on his ever-mem

orable Antarctic voyage in the “It was a supersession of the occu- Erebus and Terror; the very ships pant in the strictest etymological which, under Franklin's command, sense--a supersession in the sense in

were destined for so melancholy a which the Archbishop of York under

fate at the northern Pole. We stood the word when, in the famous medieval struggle between the north

cannot forbear the quotation here ern and southern archiepiscopates for

of a most pathetic passage in Mr precedence, he asserted his claim to Traill's book :the place of honour on the right of the sovereign by the direct method

" It was singular enough that the of seating himself on his brother of ion vessels which had done so much,

Erebus and Terror, these two companCanterbury's lap."

and were destined to do yet more battle

with the Arctic ice, should have been It is not astonishing that Franklin felt deeply hurt. The ill-will them, at the other Pole of the world,

selected for a service which brought that his subordinates bore him, into such close contact with the last however, brought about a result commander the Erebus was ever to they were not likely to have fore- have ; but this strange accident was seen. A letter from Eleanor to be yet more strikingly emphaFranklin, in the writer's collec- sised. During the sojourn of the extion, which may be quoted here, the hospitalities customary in such

plorers at the port of Hobart Town, testifies to the hearty sympathy cases were exchanged between ships accorded by the people to their and shore, and among the Franklin Governor on his departure. papers of the year 1811 is still pre

served one of those usually 'trivial, “These calumnies,” she writes, fond records' of past festivities to “have only served to increase the which later events have lent a pathattachment and affection of the colon- etic significance. It is the invitation ists. This has been strongly appar

card to a ball which was given on ent since papa resigned the govern- board the Erebus by the officers of ment; indeed, nothing can exceed the that ship and of the Terror, and courtesy and respect which has been which the Government House party shown him within the last three duly honoured with their presence.

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the Government ceased for a time marked features of his character. their work in this direction, and One of that enviable class whose it became evident that if Franklin fortune it is to be without enemies, sought employment at all, it must he had had little experience even be of another kind. It was at of the lesser but perhaps more trythis juncture that Lord Glenelg ing evil of an uncongenial and offered him the Governorship of cantankerous coadjutor. This was Antigua, proceeding in thoroughly to be his portion, however, in Tascharacteristic official fashion, as mania, and there is no doubt that Mr Traill puts it, “to ascertain his six years' reign in that colony what was the most unimportant must always have been remembered post that the aforesaid distin- by him as the most distasteful guished officer could be prevailed period of his life. upon to accept." But Franklin, It is not necessary to dwell though modest enough by nature, upon the history of these unon learning that it was only a fortunate squabbles, and it is to subordinate post, and that he be regretted, we think, that Mr would not be responsible directly Traill should have devoted such to the Colonial Office, recognised an inordinate array of pages to that there were occasions upon them; for in the public mind no which it was no sin se faire valoir, odium ever attached to Franklin, and declined. His refusal was and no question of clearing his characteristically sailor-like. “I character therefore presents itself. told him," he writes to his wife, Captain Mackonochie, the Goverdescribing his interview with Lord nor's private secretary, was a perGlenelg, “that it seemed to me son with “humanitarian views" little more than being 1st lieu- upon the subject of convicts, who tenant of a ship of the line." combined with his duties the rep

That he was wise in refusing resentation of an English society there could be no doubt, for with- “for the improvement of penal in a fortnight he was offered the discipline." Mr Montagu, the Governorship of Tasmania, a post Colonial Secretary, was what is of such importance that, however termed in sailor - language a seamuch he might have preferred an lawyer, and was not above secretly Arctic command, he could not do using the colonial Press in disloyal otherwise than accept it. In depreciation of his chief. Franklin January 1837 he landed with his was a man who regarded loyalty family at Hobart, and commenced and obedience — not only in the his duties.

letter but the spirit—as his unHitherto Franklin's lines had

questionable due. Add to these on the whole been cast in pleasant factors the existence of the bitterplaces. Privation, indeed, he had est and most acrimonious dissenknown in its direst form, and sions in smaller official circles, and suffering such as needed the ex- a Press unrivalled for its scurriltremest fortitude of a brave man ity, and we have all the necessary to endure; but he had always been ingredients, it must be owned, for at peace with his fellow-men. We a quarrel of the first class. Such have seen how beloved he was on a quarrel, in fact, occurred. Capthe Rainbow with officers and men tain Mackonochie found employalike, and this power of gaining ment elsewhere, and Mr Montagu the affection of his comrades seems was suspended from office, but to have been one of the most against the enmity of Lord Stan

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