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AS the grammar contains a considerable number of positions and minor rules, which are not readily discoverable by the general arrangement of the work; and as the last editions of the Exercises and Key, comprise many critical and explanatory' notes, which could not conveniently be inserted in the Grammar; the author conceived that an Alphabetical Index to the Grammar, Exercises, and Key, would not be unacceptable to the reader. With this view, and in conformity with the wishes of persons, for whose judgment he entertains great respect, he has produced the following Index to the three books.

In forming this work, it was not his sole design to assist ine student, in readily discovering any particular subjects of grammar. He wished also to express the most important principles of the art, in short, comprehensive, and striking sentences, calculated to stimulate the learner's curiosity, and to impress the subjects more deeply in his memory. The author was desirous that the work should at once form an Index to particulars, and an Epitome of the chief rules and principles of the language.

The reader who consults this Index, will observe that the references to the pages always point to the Grammar, unless the Exercises, or the Key, are mentioned. The Stereotype edition of the Grammar, the Twelfth of the Exercises, and the Tenth of the Key, are the editions referred to : and the pages of reference to each of the books, will be the same, in every subsequent edition.

In all cases, where explanatory 'notes, or critical discussions, have been inserted in the Exercises or the Key, the Index refers to the pages which contain them: and, in a few special cases, these books are referred to, as illustrating and exemplifying the rules. But general references of this kind could not be made, without giving the Index too great an extent. The student

may, · however, in every rule that is mentioned, readily apply

to the correspondent Exercise and Key ; in which he will always find a variety of exemplification, and, in many instances, extended views of the subject.

ALPHABETICAL INDEX

TO THE

Grammar, Exercises, and Key.

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ABSOLUTE. Cafe absolute--Its nature explained,

56

78,141
It belongs to no verb, expressed or implied,

140
How to be parsed,

221
How to be pointed,

261
ACCENT. Its nature and distinctions,

224-229
Accent dignifies syllables; emphasis, words,

233
Manner of pronouncing the unaccented vowels, denotes the speak-
er's education,

31,32
By what marks signified,

270
ACCUSATIVE case. The same as the objective,

53
ADDRESS to the young students, on the use and abuse of their lite-
rary attainments,

327,328
ADJECTIVE. The definition of it,
It is varied only by degrees of Cemparison,

57
Whether the pofitive is a degree of comparison,,

57
Various modes of forming the degrees of comparison,
How adjectives become nouns, and nouns adjectives, 58,166
Though the degrees of comparison are indefinite in number, yet
Janguage requires but few of them,

59
The superlative of Eminence, and the superlative of Comparison,
distinguished,

60
Every adjective has its substantive,

136
Adjectives improperly used as adverbs,

161,162
Rules for avoiding this impropriety,

Exercises, 113
Adjective pronoun such is often misapplied,

162
These

pages of the Grammar refer to Gollins & Co.'s Stereotype
Edition.

57,58

lar noun,

120.

188
188

ADJECTIVE. Double comparatives and superlatives iniproper, 162
Adjectives having a superlative signification, do not admit of com-
parison,

163
Degrees of it often inaccurately applied,

163, 164
In particular cases, the adjective and noun should not be separat-
ed,

164
When placed before, when after its noun,

164,165
A plural adjective pronoun will sometimes associate with a singu-

165
In what cafes to be omitted, in what repeated,

208
How to be pointed,

259
ADJECTIVE pronoun. See Pronoun.
ADJUNC'I S. Their nature and punctuation,

258, 263
ADVERB. Its nature, origin, and varieties,

119,121
The same word occasionally used as an adverb, an adjective, or a
substantive,

See Words,
Adverbs of time not fuperseded by the tenses of verbs and
1 why,

I 22
Adverbs improperly used as adjectives,

L62
This point elucidated,

Exercises, 63. Key, 46
Rules to determine when the adverb, and when the adjective,
should be used,

Exercises, 113
Its appropriate situation in general,

186,187,288
The adverb never commonly precedes the verb,
The adverb where improperly used for in which,
Adverbs improperly used for substantives,

188, 189
When to be omitted,
How to he pointed,

260,264
See Negatives.
AFFIRMATION is not the essence of the verb,

72,73,76
ALLEGORY. Its nature. Rules for using it properly; 319,320
ALPHABET. Nature of a perfect one,

· 15
The English alphabet imperfect,

15,17
ANTITHESIS. Its nature, 323-It should be discreetly used, 324
APOLOGY for the author's frequent additions to his grammatical
works,

Key, p. 3
APOSTROPHE. The nature and use of this figure,

323
See Characters.
APPOSITION. Rule respecting the cases of nouns in appofi-
tion,

169,177. Exercises, 71
Nouns in this state how to be pointed,

261
See Nouns.
ARRANGEMENT. A skilful arrangement of words and members
promotes perspicuity,

152,164,186,187,288,292
It also promotes the strength of a sentence,

303,308
It conduces to the harmony of language,

311,313
ARTICLE. Its nature, use, and importance,

44,46,167
The article a agrees with nouns in the singular number only: the
article the with nouns in both numbers,

166
Omitting or using the article a fornis a nice distinction in the
sense,

168

2TO

When to be omitted, when repeated, 168, 169, 207, 208, 276
Article the used as an epithet of distinction,

168
Article the is sometimes used instead of the possessive pro-
noun,

169
It sometimes governs the participle,

184
ARTICULATION. The nature of it explained,

32-34
AUXILIARY verbs. Their nature, use and importance,

71, 78, 79, 85, 95-99
The same verb is sometimes an auxiliary, sometimes a princi-
pal,

97
Their form in the Subjunctive Mood,

90, 99, 196—201
This form exemplified, Exercises, 85–88. Key, 54-58
Auxiliary and principal constitute but one verb,

84, 85, 100, 108, 109
Auxiliary and principal form a compound rense,
The auxiliaries should, would, &c. refer occasionally to present,
past, and future time,

83, 91, 180
AUXILIARY. The auxiliary let governs the objective case, 178
When to be omitted, or repeated,

209, 210. Key, 66
Auxiliary words abound in English, and in other modern
tongues,

119
See Verb.

100

B.

THE BIBI.E. The present translation of it is the best standard of
the Englith language,

161
DR. BLAIR'S recommendation of the study of grammar and com-
pofition,

6,7

C.

238, 239

CADENCE. Its nature, and how to be managed,

The close of a sentence should not be abrupt, or unpleasant, 314
CÆSURA and demi-cæsura. The nature of these poetical pauses
explained,

249, 251
CAPITAL letters. Rules respecting the use of them, 272, 273
Mode of exercising the student in them,

Exercises, 125
CASE. Only three in English,

53
Mode of forming cases in Latin, not applicable to our lan-
guage,

54
Reasons in support of an objective case attached to English
nouns,

54, 56, 110
The verb to be has the same case before and after it,

177
This rule applies also, if the verb is not expressed,
Passive verbs of naming have the same cafe before and after
them,

178. Exercises, 71
P

Ex. 71

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