Page images
PDF

sued in one no- if judgment be given for the party pursuing the same, such party shall not tion, costs can thereon recover the costs of more than one action orprocess,unless special ed L fnoue'8*" cause for several actions or processes shall be satisfactorily shown on moCosts to be re- tion in open court. covered only in sEC. o_ gc it further enacted, That whenever proceedings shall be had that !sbsuffi- 6n on several libels against any vessel and cargo which might legally be cient. joined in one libel before a court of the United States or of the territo

the capture, though made in good faith, is in law adjudged tortious, the claimant is entitled by the general practice of the court to such costs as have necessarily arisen in the prosecution of his claim, unless he has been guilty of such misconduct as amounts to a forfeiture of such costs. The Ulpiano, 1 Mason, 91.

21. When a cause is removed from a state court to the ci/cuit court, under the act of Congress, the plaintiff is entitled to recover his costs; although he obtains a verdict for less than five hundred dollars. KIlis v. Jarvis, 3 Mason, 457.

22. If a witness, recognised for the defendant, is marked on the indictment, and sent to the grand jury by the district attorney, the United States, on the acquittal of the prisoner, must pay the witness his costs. United States v. Coulter, C. C. U. S. of Pennsylvania, April, 1803.

23. It is within the discretion of the court to permit the defendant to file a new plea; but where the effect of it would be to put the plaintiff out of court, and the cause was instituted in consequence of the act of the defendant himself, and had been long at issue before the application was made, the court would not permit it to be done, unless the defendant would pay Dot only the costs incurred since the filing of his first plea, but the whole costs of the action. Anonymous, 2 Wash. C. C. It. 270.

24. Where the plaintiff prevails in the action, the court will not, in the exercise of their discretion, tax the costs against him, where he might naturally and fairly suppose he was entitled to recover more than five hundred dollars. Cottle v. Payne, 3 Day, 289.

25. Costs and expenses are not matters positively limited by law, but arc allowed in the exercise of a sound discretion of the court; and no appeal lies from a mere decree respecting costs and expenses. Canter v. The American and Ocean Insurance Company, 3 Peters, 319.

26. In Virginia, if the first ca. sa. be returned uon est, the second may include the costs of issuing both. Peyton v. Brooke, 3 Cranch, 92; 1 Cond. Rep. 464.

27. Costs will be allowed on the dismission of a writ of error for want of jurisdiction, if the original defendant be defendant in error. Winchester v. Jackson ct a!. 3 Cranch, 515; 1 Cond. Rep. 612.

28. A party who obtains a continuance of a cause, must pay the costs of the term. Lessee of Pattnn v. Blackwell, 2 Overt. Rep. 114.

29. The Supreme Court has no jurisdiction in a case in which the judges of the circuit court havo divided in opinion, upon a motion for a rule to show cause why the taxation of the costs of the marshal on an execution should not be reversed. Bank of the United States v. Green and others, 6 Peters, 26.

30. The transcript of the record had been lodged by the plaintiffs in error with the clerk of the court iin the 24th of October, 1835; who refused to file it or docket the cause, until the plaintiffs had given the fee bond in pursuance of the thirty-seventh rule of the court. The counsel for the plaintiffs in error moved to have the transcript filed and docketed; alleging they had done all the law required to bo done in order to bring the case before the Supreme Court. On the part of the defendant in error, his counsel filed and read in open court certified copies of the writ of error, citation and appeal bond, and of the judgment of the circuit court; and having stated that the plaintiffs in error had failed to have the case docketed according to the thirtieth rule of the court, they moved to have the case docketed and dismissed. The court overruled the motion to docket and dismiss the cause; and also the motion to have the transcript filed, and the cause docketed without the fee bond being first given. These motions were overruled on the ISth of January, 1836; and the court allowed the plaintiffs in error until the 1st day of March following to give to the clerk the fee bond: on the failure so to give the same, the writ of error to bo dismissed. Owings r. Ticrnan, 10 Peters, 417.

31. If the court had jurisdiction of the cause, when the action was commenced, the repeal of the law which gave the jurisdiction, will not take away the plaintiff's right to costs. Walker v. Smith, 1 Wash. C. C. R. 202.

32. Where three members of the bar enter their appearance for the defendant, to suits instituted against him, and are all equally called upon, and act as the attorneys of the defendant, no warrant of attorney having been given by the defendant to either; the attorneys' fee in the bill of costs is to be equally divided among all who have acted in the case, and who have appeared to the suits. Hurst r. Durncll, 1 Wash. C. C. R. 438.

33. Query. If in an action for the violation of a patent, the plaintiff recover five hundred dollars damages, or the damages when trebled amount to that sum, the plaintiff is entitled to costs. Kncas v. The 8chuylkill Bank, 4 Wash. C. C. R. 106.

34. The common law gave costs in no case; and the statute of Gloucester gave them only where damages were recoverable at common law. Ibid.

35. If the defendant do not demand security for costs within a reasonable time, it shall not be a ground for a continuance, that such security has not been given when the cause is called for trial. Hawkins v. Wiltbank, 4 Wash. C. C. R. 285.

36. The clerk of the circuit court for the district of Pennsylvania cannot charge in the bill of costs any compensation for the travel and attendance of the successful party, none such being allowed in the supreme court of the state. But he ought to tax one dollar and twenty-five cents a day for the attendance of each witness, and five cents a mile for their travelling to and from the court. Scbring's Lessee v. Ward, 4 Wash. C. C. R. 546.

37. Costs are imposed on a party asking for an amendment of the pleadings. But in a case where, from the irregularity of the practice in the courts of Pennsylvania, the error requiring amendment arose, costs were not allowed. Lessee of Laning t1. Dolph, 4 Wash. C. C. R. G30.

ries thereof, there shall not be allowed thereon more costs than on one libel, unless special cause for libelling the vessel and cargo severally shall be satisfactorily shown as aforesaid. And in proceedings on several libels or informations against any cargo or parts of cargo or merchandise seized as forfeited for the same cause, there shall not be allowed by the court more costs than would be lawful on one libel or information, whatever may be the number of owners or consignees therein concerned: but allowance may be made on one libel or information for the costs incidental to several claims: Provided, That in case of a claim of any vessel or other property seized on behalf of the United States and libelled or informed against as forfeited under any of the laws thereof, if judgment shall pass in favour of the claimant, he shall be entitled to the same upon paying only his own costs.

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That whenever causes of like nature, or relative to the same question shall be pending before a court of the United States or of the territories thereof, it shall be lawful for the court to make such orders and rules concerning proceedings therein as may be conformable to the principles and usages belonging to courts for avoiding unnecessary costs or delay in the administration of justice, and accordingly causes may be consolidated as to the court shall appear reasonable. And if any attorney, proctor, or other person admitted to manage and conduct causes in a court of the United States or of the territories thereof, shall appear to have multiplied the proceedings in any cause before the court so as to increase costs unreasonably and vexatiously, such person may be required by order of court to satisfy any excess of costs so incurred.

Approved, July 22, 1813.

No more costs than on one libel or information for the same cause of forfeiture.

Proviso.

On a claim of

ftroperty libeled, if the property is restored, the claimant shall only pay his own costs.

Causes may bo consolidated, to avoid unnecessary costs or delay.

Attorney or proctor to pay excess of costs if proceedings have been multiplied unreasonably.

38. The plaintiff having recovered at law, the court directed the costs of the bill of discovery, by which the plaintiffs at law were prevented recovering, should be paid by the defendants in the bill; they being plaintiffs at law. Lessee of Bowne v. Brown ct al. 2 Wash. C. C. It. 271.

39. The clerk of the court is a competent judge of the amount of costs which can bo recovered in an action; and money paid to him is in the safe keeping of the court, and subject to its disposal. Willing ct al. r. Consequa, 1 Peters' C. C. R. 301.

40. In a case of tort, several costs of travel, attendance, and attorney's fees will be allowed to the several defendants, whether the pleadings arc joint or several. Crosby r. Folgcr, 1 Sumner's Rep. 514.

41. In case of a claim on proceeds in the custody of the court, where other parties arc entitled, no costs can be allowed beyond those for which there is a specific lien, and the actual charges of court. No attorney's fees can be allowed. The Jerusalem, 2 Gallis. 345.

42. Query. If a consul, who sues for a penalty, in his own name and person, but for the benefit of the United States, is liable for costs? Levy v. Burlcy, 2 Sumner's C. C. R. 355.

43. After notice of trial, the defendant cannot move to put off the trial, until the costs of a'former ejectment be paid, without notice that such a motion would be made; nor can it prevail under any circumstances, if the costs be demanded on an ejectment, which had been decided in the state court. Den t1. Bacon & Sharp, 4 Wash. C. C. R. 578.

44. In an action for the violation of a patent right, the plaintiff having recovered a verdict for three cents damages, is not entitled to full costs under the 20th sec. of the judicial act of September 24th, 17S9, ch. 20. Kneas r. The Schuylkill Bank, 4 Wash. C. C. R. 100.

45. Where the plaintiff, being a non-resident, has filed security for costs, conditioned to pay them, "if the plaintiff does not prosecute his suit to effect, and docs not pay the costs of the suit," in case the plaintiff succeeds, the sureties nre exonerated from the payment of any costs; but the plaintiff is responsible to the officers of the court for his own costs, and the court will enforce the payment of them by attachment. Lessee of Bowne r. Arbuncle, 1 Peters' C. C. R. 234.

Supreme Court, January Term, 1S3S.
Rute of Court Xo. 45 et seq.

In all cases, where any suit shall be dismissed in the Supreme Court, except where the dismissal ■hall be for want of jurisdiction, costs shall be allowed for the defendant in error, or appellee, as the case may be, unless otherwise agreed by the parties.

In all cases of affirmances of any judgment or decree in the Supreme Court, costs shall be allowed to the defendant in error, or appellee, as the case may be, unless otherwise ordered by the court.

In all cases of reversals of any judgment or decree in the Supreme Court, except where the reversal shall be for want of jurisdiction, costs shall be allowed m the Supreme Court for the plaintiffin error, or appellant, as the case may be; unless otherwise ordered by the court.

Neither of the foregoing rules shall apply to cases where the United States are a party; but in such cases no costs shall be allowed in the Supreme Court for or against the United States.

When costs are allowed in the Supreme Court, it shall be the duty of the clerk to insert the amount thereof in the body of the mandate, or other proper process, sent to the court below; and annex to the same the bill of items taxed in detail.

Statute I. July 22, 1813.

[Repealed.] Act of January 9, 1815, ch. 21, sect. 2.

Collection districts.

New Hampshire.

Massachusetts.

Vermont.

Chap. XVI.—Jin Act for the assessment and collection of direct taxes and internal

duties.(a)

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That for the purpose of assessing and collecting direct taxes and internal duties, there shall be, and are hereby designated and established the following collection districts, to wit:

The state of New Hampshire shall contain five collection districts, as follow: The first district shall consist of the county of Rockingham; the second of the county of Strafford; the third of the county of Hillsborough; the fourth of the county of Cheshire; and the fifth of the counties of Grafton and Coos.

The state of Massachusetts shall contain eighteen collection districts, as follow: The first district shall consist of the county of Washington; the second of the county of Hancock; the third of the county of Lincoln; the fourth of the county of Kennebec; the fifth of the county of Somerset; the sixth of the county of Oxford; the seventh of the county of Cumberland; the eighth of the county of York; the ninth of the county of Essex; the tenth of the county of Middlesex; the eleventh of the county of Suffolk; the twelfth of the county of Norfolk; the thirteenth of the county of Plymouth; the fourteenth of the county of Bristol; the fifteenth of the counties of Barnstable, Dukes, and Nanlucket; the sixteenth of the county of Worcester; the seventeenth of the counties of Hampshire, Franklin, and Hampden; and the eighteenth of the county of Berkshire.

The state of Vermont shall contain six collection districts, as follow: The first shall consist of the counties of Bennington and Rutland; the second of the county of Windham; the third of the counties of Windsor and Orange; the fourth of the counties of Addison and Chittenden; the fifth of the counties of Franklin and Grand Isle; and the sixth of the counties of Caledonia, Essex, and Orleans.

The aforesaid counties, comprised in the said districts contained in the state of Vermont, shall be taken to comprehend such territory as was included in the said counties respectively, prior to the formation of the county of Jefferson in said state.

The state of Rhode Island shall contain three collection districts, as follow: The first shall consist of the counties of Newport and Bristol; the second of the county of Providence; and the third of the counties of Washington and Kent.

The state of Connecticut shall contain seven collection districts, as follow: The first shall consist of the county of Litchfield; the second of the county of Fairfield; the third of the county of New Haven; the fourth of the county of Harford; the fifth of the county of New London; the sixth of the county of Middlesex; and the seventh of the counties of Windham and Tolland.

The state of New York shall contain twenty-eight collection districts, as follow : The first shall consist of the counties of Suffolk, Queens, and Kings; the second of the city and county of New York ; the third of the county of Westchester; the fourth of Duchess county; the fifth of the counties of Orange and Rockland; the sixth of the counties of Ulster and Sullivan; the seventh of the county of Schoharie; the eighth of the county of Columbia; the ninth of the county of Rensselaer; the tenth of the county of Washington; the eleventh of the county of Saratoga; the twelfth

(a) See notes to the net of July 1798, vol. i., p. 5S0, for a list of all the acts of Congress relating to the assessment of lands and slaves for direct taxes.

A bond given by the collector of the internal revenue, with sureties, conditioned that the collector had accounted and would account for all taxes collected or to be collected, is not binding on the sureties as to collections previously made. Armstrong et al. r. The United States, Peters' C. C. R. 46.

Rhode Island.

Connecticut.

New York.

of the counties of Essex, Clinton, and Franklin; the thirteenth of the counties of Albany and Schenectady; the fourteenth of the county of Montgomery; the fifteenth of the county of Herkimer; the sixteenth of the county of Oneida; the seventeenth of the counties of Lewis, Jefferson, and St. Lawrence; the eighteenth of the county of Otsego; the nineteenth of the county of Chenango; the twentieth of the county of Madison; the twenty-first of the counties of Tioga, Broome, and Steuben; the twentysecond of the counties of Onandago and Cortland; the twenty-third of the counties of Cayuga and Seneca; the twenty-fourth of the county of Ontario; the twenty-fifth of the counties of Gennessee, Niagara, Chautaque, Cataragus, and Allegheny; the twenty-sixth of the county of Richmond; the twenty-seventh of the county of Greene; and the twentyeighth of the county of Delaware.

The state of New Jersey shall contain six collection districts, as follow: The first shall consist of the counties of Bergen and Essex; the second of the counties of Sussex and Morris; the third of the counties of Somerset and Hunterdon; the fourth of the counties of Middlesex and Monmouth; the fifth of the counties of Burlington and Gloucester; and the sixth of the counties of Salem, Cumberland, and Cape May.

The state of Pennsylvania shall contain twenty-three collection districts, as follow: The first shall consist of the city of Philadelphia; the second of the county of Philadelphia; the third of the counties of Chester and Delaware; the fourth of the county of Montgomery; the fifth of the county of Bucks; the sixth of the county of Lancaster; the seventh of the counties of York and Adams; the eighth of the counties of Northampton and Wayne; the ninth of the county of Berks; the tenth of the county of Dauphin; the eleventh of the counties of Cumberland and Franklin; the twelfth of the county of Northumberland; the thirteenth of the counties of Mifflin and Huntingdon; the fourteenth of the counties of Bedford, Sommerset, and Cambria; the fifteenth of the counties of Fayette and Greene; the sixteenth of the county of Washington; the seventeenth of the counties of Allegheny and Armstrong; the eighteenth of the counties of Westmoreland and Indiana; the nineteenth of the counties of Centre, Clearfield, Potter, Jefferson, and M'Kean; the twentieth of the county of Luzerne, having the same limits as it had before the counties of Susquehannah and Bradford were laid off; the twenty-first of the counties of Lycoming and Tioga, the same having the limits as it had before the county of Bradford was laid off; the twentysecond of the counties of Mercer, Butler, and Beaver; and the twentythird of the counties of Crawford, Venango, Erie, and Warren.

The state of Delaware shall contain tluree collection districts, as follow: The first shall consist of the county of New Castle; the second of the county of Kent; and the third of the county of Sussex.

The state of Maryland shall contain nine collection districts, as follow: The first shall consist of the counties of Somerset, Worcester, and Dorchester; the second of the counties of Talbot, Queen Anne, and Caroline; the third of the counties of Kent, Cecil, and Hartford; the fourth of the city and county of Baltimore; the fifth of the counties of Anne Arundel and Prince George; the sixth of the counties of Calvert, St. Mary's, and Charles; the seventh of the counties of Montgomery and Frederick; the eighth of the county of Washington; and the ninth of the county of Allegheny.

The state of Virginia shall contain twenty-six collection districts, as follow: The first shall consist of the counties of Lee, Russell, Washington, Wythe, and Grayson; the second of the counties of Montgomery, Tazewell, Giles, Monroe, and Botetourt; the third of the counties of Greenbriar, Kanhawa, Cabell, and Mason; the fourth of the counties of Harrison, Wood, and Randolph; the fifth of the counties of Monongalia, Ohio, and Brooke; the sixth of the counties of Bath, Pendleton, Hardy,

Collection districts.

New Jersey.

Pennsylvania.

Delaware.

Maryland.

Virginia.

Collection districts.

North Carolina.

Kentucky.

and Hampshire; the seventh of the counties of Rockbridge and Augusta; the eighth of the counties of Rockingham and Shenandoah; the ninth of the counties of Frederick, Berkley, and Jefferson; the tenth of the counties of Bedford, Patrick, Henry, and Franklin; the eleventh of the counties of Campbell, Charlotte, Pittsylvania, and Halifax; the twelfth of the counties of Mecklinburg, Lunenburg, Brunswick, and Nottaway; the thirteenth of the counties of Prince Edward, Buckingham, Cumberland, and Amelia; the fourteenth of the counties of Powhatan, Chesterfield, Dinwiddie, and Prince George; the fifteenth of the counties of Greensville, Sussex, Southampton, and Surry; the sixteenth of the counties of the Isle of Wight, Nansemond, Norfolk, and Princess Anne; the seventeenth of the counties of Elizabeth City, Warwick, York, James City, and New Kent; the eighteenth of the counties of Charles City, Henrico, Goochland, and Hanover; the nineteenth of the counties of Amherst, Nelson, Albemarle, and Fluvannah; the twentieth of the counties of Orange, Madison, and Culpepper; the twenty-first of the counties of Fauquier, Prince William, and Stafford; the twenty-second of the counties of Loudon and Fairfax; the twenty-third of the counties of Spottsylvania, Louisa, and Caroline; the twenty-fourth of the counties of King George, Westmoreland, Richmond, Northumberland, and Lancaster; the twenty-fifth of the counties of King William, King and Queen, Essex, Middlesex, Gloucester, and Mathews; and the twenty-sixth of the counties of Accomack and Northampton.

The state of North Carolina shall contain thirteen collection districts, as follow: The first shall consist of the counties of Currituck, Camden, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Gates, Chowan, and Hertford; the second of the counties of Bertie, Martin, Northampton, and Halifax; the third of the counties of Washington, Tyrrel, Hyde, Pitt, Edgecombe, and Beaufort; the fourth of the counties of Green, Craven, Carteret, Jones, Lenoir, Johnston, and Wayne; the fifth of the counties of Warren, Franklin, Nash, and Granville; the sixth of the counties of Onslow, New Hanover, Duplin, Sampson, Brunswick, Bladen, and Columbus; the seventh of the counties of Cumberland, Robertson, Montgomery, Richmond, Anson, and Moore; the eighth of the counties of Wake, Orange, and Person; the ninth of the counties of Rockingham, Caswell, Guilford, and Stokes; the tenth of the counties of Rowan, Randolph, and Chatham; the eleventh of the counties of Lincoln, Mecklenburg, and Cabarras; the twelfth of the counties of Buncomb, Haywood, Burke, and Rutherford; the thirteenth of the counties of Surry, Wilkes, Iredell, and Ashe.

The state of Ohio shall contain nine collection districts, as follow: The first shall consist of the counties of Hamilton, Butler, Warren, Clinton, and Clermont; the second of the counties of Greene, Montgomery, Preble, Miami, and Champaigne; the third of the counties of Pickaway, Franklin, Madison, Delaware, Knox, Licking, and Fairfield; the fourth of the counties of Ross, Athens, Gallia, Sciota, Adams, Highland, and Fayette; the fifth of the counties of Washington, Muskingum, Tuscarawas, and Guernsey; the sixth of the counties of Belmont and Jefferson; the seventh of the counties of Columbiana and Starke; the eighth of the counties of Trumbull and Ashtabula; and the ninth of the counties of Giauga, Cayahoga, and Portage.

The state of Kentucky shall contain ten collection districts, as follow: The first district shall consist of the counties of Clark, Estill, Montgomery, Bath, Fleming, Greenup, and Floyd; the second of the counties of Fayette, Jessamine, and Woodford; the third of the counties of Scott, Harrison, Pendleton, Campbell, Boone, Gallatin, and Franklin ; the fourth of the counties of Bourbon, Nicholas, Bracken, Mason, and Lewis; the fifth of the counties of Livingston, Caldwell, Christian, Breckenridge, Ohio, Grayson, Muhlenburg, Henderson, Hopkins, and Union; the sixth of the counties of Barron, Warren, Logan, Butler, and Cumberland; the

« ՆախորդըՇարունակել »