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BY
REV. HUBBARD WINSLOW;

AND

WOMAN IN HER SOCIAL AND DOMESTIC CHARACTER,

BY

MRS. JOHN SANDFORD.

CONTENTS OF PART I.
Chap. 1. THE APPROPRIATE SPHERE OF WOMAN.

2. THE INFLUENCE OF CHRISTIANITY ON WOMAN.
3 THE CHRISTIAN EDUCATION OF WOMAN.

INTRODUCTORY NOTICE. " The first chapter is designed to indicate the sphere in which Christianily instructs Woman to move and act; the second to show what Christianity has done for her, and to exhibit the reasons why more women than men become pious; the third, to illustrate what is implied in the true Christian education of Woman.

" It is well known, that as the savage and pagan state is to women one of peculiar depression, so to them the civilized and refined state is attended with some peculiar liabilities to enervation and degeneracy, and that through their degeneracy, in no small degree, comes the downfall of states and nations There is an insatiate yawning gulf, into which indolence, Juxury, extravagance, and dissipation have plunged many a nation of high hopes and attainments; and these have had their origin and countenance, in a great measure, in the false education and habits of the better sex. I have endeavored to set forth the dangers to our rising country from this source, and to show how they may be avoided ; to present to the minds of "our daughters" an object worthy of their lofliest and most benevolent ambition, and to show them how they may obtain it; to convince them that the right cultivation and truest excellence of the female character lie at a much higher point than has been usually supposed, and to set before them the means and motives to become (in that elevated and holy state of society called the kingdom or reign of Christ, to which we aspire, and which we confidently expect) “as corner stones polished after the similitude of a palace." If the design is effectual to its object in any degree, the author's bumble effogts will be well rewarded.

H. W."
CONTENTS OF PART II.
Chap, l. Causes of emale Influence.

2. Importanc@of Letters to Woman.
3. Importance of Religion to Woman.
4. Christianity, the source of Female Excellence.
5. Scripture Illustrative of Female Character.
6. Female Influence on Religion,
7. Female Defects.
8. Feinale Romance.
9. Female Education.
10. Fernale Duties.

OTIS, BRO A DERS & CO. PUBLISHERS AND BOOKSELLERS..............120 WASHINGTON STREET, Boston,

HAVE LATELY PUBLISHED ABERCROMBIE's INQUIRIES CONCERNING THE INTELLECTUAL POWERS AND THE INVESTIGATION OF TRUTH, with additions and explanations to adapt the work to the use of Schools and Academies. By Rev. Jacob Abbott, author of " The Young Christian," &c.

ABERCROMBIE's PhilosOPHY OF THE MORAL FEELINGS, with an Introductory Chapter, Additions and Explanations, to adapt the work to the use of Schools and Academies; and also, Analytical Questions for the Examination of Classes. By Rev Jacob Abbott, author of “ The Young Christian," &c.

THE MOUNT VERNON READER, a course of Reading Lessons, selected with reference to their moral influence on the Hearts and Lives of the Young ; Designed for middle clusses, by the Messrs Abbott.

The MOUNT VERNON READER FOR JUNIOR CLASSES on the same plan as above; by the Messrs Abbott.

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I. ] HE COURSE or InstRUCTION AT HARROW School, INCLUDING AN Account of its

Discipline, Expenses, Prizes, SCHOLARSHIP, Examinations, &c. - 97 II. ON ATTENTION, · · · · · · · III. PHYSICIANS TO Scuools, · · · · · IV. LECTURES BEFORE THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE,

122 V. MR COLERIDGE AT Schoou, . . . . . . . 130

Reviews and NoticES, . . . . . . . 133
TEACHERS' SEMINARY AT Andover, . . . . . . 142

PROFESSOR DAVIES' ARITHMETIC AND ALGEBRA,

DESIGNED TOB

ACADEMIES AND SCHOOLS.

MENTAL AND PRACTICAL ARITHMETIC. By CHARLES DAVIES, Author of a complete course of Mathematics.

Favorable testimonials of this work have been received from all parts of the country—it is rapidly gaining introduction into our best Academies and Schools. The pecuniary consideration as well the true merits of this work, gives it a pre-eminence over all others. The present edition with supplement contains a full quantity of examples, amounting to upwards of 3000, and is afforded at a low price, which will bring it within the reach of every pupil.

FIRST LESSONS IN A L G E BRA;

A new work by the same author ; this work is elementary, and designed to follow the Mental and ractical Arithmetic. Teachers who have examined this work, pronounce it (unqualifiedly) to be admirably adapted for beginners in the study of this Science.

FOR SALE BY THE PRINCIPAL BOOKSELLERS IN BOSTON, NEW YORK, PHILA

DELPHIA AND BALTIMORE.

AMERICAN

ANNALS OF EDUCATION.

M ARCH,2839.

Art. I.—THE COURSE OF INSTRUCTION AT HARROW SCHOOL,

INCLUDING AN ACCOUNT OF ITS DISCIPLINE, EXPENSES, PRIZES, SCHOLARSHIPS, EXAMINATIONS, &c.

School Days and Hours. Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays are whole school days; Tuesday is a whole holiday; Thursdays and Saturdays are half-holidays. On Sundays the boys are in school from eight till nine, for the purpose of religious instruction ; on all other days, except Tuesday, at half-past seven. Each school consists of one hour's work, except the first school, which is of about an hour and a half's duration ; and the third school, at a quarter-past twelve on Thursdays (which applies only to the sixth and fifth forms, and is spent in a Lecture on Modern Ilistory and Literature,) is of somewhat less than an hour's length.

Roll-calls on Holidays and Half-holidays. On holidays and half-holidays the boys are compelled to answer at the call of " The Billevery two hours. On a holiday at nine and eleven o'clock, A. M.; dinner in their respective houses at one; bills again at two, four, and six in the summer. The bills on the half-holiday afternoons are the same as those on the afternoon of the holiday. The boys are locked up in their houses for the night at an hour varying according to the light, and ranging between a quarter past five in the depth of winter and a quarter to nine

about midsummer. The bills are called over in the school by the head master, or one of his assistants, during one week; and by the under master, or his assistant, during the following week; and so on during the term.

Establishment of Masters. According to the original foundation of John Lyon, in the year 1585, the establishment of the school consisted of a master and an usher, who were both to reside in one house. They were bound to give gratuitous instruction to the sons of any inhabitants of the parish of Harrow, the master being at the same time permitted to receive the sons of persons residing elsewhere as boarders. The number of these foreigners having considerably increased, the usher, now called the under master, took a separate house, in which he received a more limited number of boys, at a higher salary, as private pupils of his own; and from the progressive advancement of the school the head master found it necessary to engage assistants, who were also allowed to take private pupils into their houses. The number of assistants, to the head master is now four; the under master has one.

Boarding Houses. But while the under master, and the several assistants, thus receive boys at an increased salary, the house of the head master, who does not act as private tutor to any of the boys under his roof, continues, according to the original intention of John Lyon, merely as a boarding house. Besides which there are other boarding houses upon the same footing with respect to terms, kept by private individuals otherwise unconnected with the school; but these houses are under strict control, and are constantly visited and inspected by the masters. As it is the invariable practice of the school that each boy should have a private tutor, the head master nominates some one or other of the assistants to act in that capacity for every boy in his own house or in the several boarding houses.

Foundation Boys. The total number of boys in the school at Midsummer, 1831, was two hundred and fourteen; whereof fifteen only were upon John Lyon's foundation. These latter boys are exempt from the payment of the ten guineas a year for

total number of band fourteen; whese latter bo

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