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Counties.

Number of Districts which

reported. Number of Trees

and Shrubs.

| Apricot.

Arbor Vitae. Apple. Basswood. Boxwood.

Beech. | Butternut. | Birch, | Catalpa.

Hackmatack. | Cherry.

Ash. | Chestnut. | Cedar. | Horse Chestnut. | Cottonwood.

Dogwood. | Cork. | Hornbeam.

Elm.
| Hemlock.

Juniper.
Fir.

Linden.
1 Locust.

Mulberry.

Maple. | Pepperidge.

Peach.
Į Oak.

Tough-horn. 1 Pear.

Japanese Ivy.

Pine. | Poplar.

Spruce.

Plum.
| Tamarack.

Walnut.
Tulip.
Willow,

Vines.

Shrubs.

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14

SCHOOL HOUSES AND LIBRARIES.

Summary of Statistics, 1886-7.
Number of new school-houses built in the

year,
Decrease for the year,
Number of school-houses in the State,
Number of school-houses reported in poor condition,

Decrease for the year,
Number of schools having libraries,
Number of books in school libraries,
Number of districts drawing State money during the

3 1,655 156

15

322 47,907

fiscal year,

287

Total amount of library money paid to districts dur

ing the fiscal year, Number of public libraries reported, Number of sittings in public schools,

Summary of Statistics, 1866-88.

$5,000

82 129,344

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453

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310 313 291 304 282 270 256 254 240 218 224 212 201 213 192 211 208 217 184 177 167 171 156

154 132 178 167 195 221 221 188 165 195 185 203 287

$ 590.00

515.00

865.00 1,730.00 1,960.00 2,385.00 2,345.74 2,955.00 3,340.00 2,450.00 2,900.00 2,270.00 2,975.00 3,190.00 3,040.00 3,005.00 4,255,00 3,470.00 3,090.00 3,025.00 3,300.00 3,525.00 5,000.00

1886 1887

1,658 1,659

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1888 1,655

43,873 47,907

The number of school-houses built since 1865 is 618, which is more than one-third of the whole number now standing.

While the number of school-houses reported is the same for 1867 as for 1888 there have in twenty years been great changes.

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New buildings are constantly demanded and erected in cities and large towns, while in declining towns school-houses have been entirely abandoned. Often two or more contiguous districts have united and occupy one school-house, instead of the two or more formerly required.

The number of sittings is greater than the number of scholars who enter the public schools. It cannot be said, however, that there are ample accommodations for all children. There are towns and districts where little children are wasting their time because too many are crowded into one room. Not more than 40 children can be seated and instructed in one room, if due regard is paid to health and efficient teaching. Especially do young children form bad habits and fail in the special work of early years, if they cannot receive adequate attention.

In the last few years the interest in libraries and books for schools has greatly increased. The number of school libraries has increased in four years from 219 to 322. The number of

districts drawing money from 195 to 287, and the amount • drawn from $3025 to $5000—the limit of the State appropriation.

There were more applications at the close of the last fiscal year than could be paid out of the appropriation for the year.

A report of the number of books now in these libraries has been secured for two years only. It appears to have been accurately made, but needs verification.

These libraries have everywhere been of advantage to the schools. They have stimulated the scholars, and aided the teachers. There is need of legislation which will make the benefits received from this library money permanent. There are many districts which have in years past drawn this money from the State and today have not a remnant of a book or of any apparatus. There are well-known cases of misappropriation, while the cases of neglect and loss because of changing officers are very numerous.

The gratifying advance shown in the matters of buildings and libraries is not universal. There are still

poor school-houses and 300 districts which have never drawn library money. The following statement, verified by personal inspection, describes a school-house in a district which will neither repair nor build.

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"The appearance of the inside of the room is bad. The floor is dirty, the desks cut and unpainted, some of the seats broken so that they are hardly six inches wide, most of the plastering is off the walls and ceiling, and windows are loose and dirty. The outhouse was in an awful condition, * * the door was off its hinges and the building faced the road.”

TEXT-BOOK OF PHYSIOLOGY. The following circular was sent to the Secretaries of the Boards of Visitors :

OFFICE OF STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION,

HARTFORD, September 7th, 1887. DEAR SIR-The text-book on Physiology, prepared and published by order of the General Assembly of 1886, will be ready for distribution about September 15th.

Copies for “use of scholars in the public schools needing the same,” will be sent to you for distribution to the schools of your Town. If you desire a supply, please inform me on enclosed postal to what express office the bundle shall be sent.

The book is elementary. Examiners and teachers should be familiar with more extended works. It is not a reading book. No special endeavor has been made to render the text interesting. The subject must be made attractive by teachers, and to this end suggestions, illustrations, and experiments have been given. The whole is an outline and guide for teachers and scholars.

It follows that nothing will be gained by putting the book into the hands of all scholars. Scholars below the highest class in graded and ungraded schools can be most successfully taught by oral lessons, using the book as an outline,

A set of twelve diagrams will be sent for each school. They are intended as copies for drawing lessons.

The books will be furnished to towns “for the use of scholars in the public schools.” The law is understood to impose the distribution and care of these books upon the Visitors who are town officers. They can be used by scholars in the different schools, but remain under the control of the Visitors, who should see that they are preserved, and transmitted from class to class as they are needed.

Books can be furnished free only for the use of scholars. In order that teachers and others may supply themselves, copies will be sent to any address upon receipt of 25 cents for each copy, which covers cost of book and expense of sending.

Yours truly,

Secretary.

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31,76 Kerti

1:59.outer science 6. Tazazite Peisebasto the act I:

SETiming Bush, tiat vitt spese base give into witte tra and independence. Enes. To ere radariation of the bus dcesto de ser that it Orte ing. But it is prei trasce ok weze a brand 6906, it would not be accep ed.

It ie tas early to pronounce a contient opinion upon the 07fu-riment. Some like the book and some do not . So far as can tue, learned, and the investigation has been impartial, those vibu like it are more than those who do not. It is not in purJo jose or in methods suggested, the ordinary text-book, but many who are interested in good teaching approve its plan.

The following table gives record of distribution to December 31-t, 1887. Two towns have applied for and received books mince this date.

Bull

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