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Sec. 1. That school directors or controllers shall purchase text books and other necessary school supplies for use in the public schools of their respective school districts as such new text-books and supplies are required, in addition to those at present in use in the hands of pupils, or owned by the school districts, out of the school fund of the district, and when so procured the necessary books and school supplies shall be furnished free of cost for use in the schools of said district, subject to the orders of the directors or controllers thereof, whose duty it shall be to provide for the return of and for the safe keeping and care of the books, which shall be returned at the close of the annual school term in each year or as the board may direct. Approved May 18, 1893.

ROBERT E. PATTISON.

PERMANENT CERTIFICATES TO COLLEGE GRADUATES.

AN ACT to authorize the State Superintendent of Public Instruction to grant permanent State teachers' certificates to graduates of recognized literary and scientific colleges.

SEC. 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in General Assembly met, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same: That after the passage of this act the State Superintendent of Pubiic Instruction be empowered to, and shall grant without examination permanent State teachers' certificates to all applicants therefor who are graduates of recognized literary or scientific colleges legally empowered to confer the degrees of Bachelor of Arts (B. A.) Master of Arts (M. A.) Bachelor of Science (B. S.) Master of Science and Bachelor of Philosophy (Ph. B.) and whose course of study embraces not less than four collegiate years. Provided: Said applicants are at least twenty-one years of age, and have taught at least three full annual terms in the public schools of the Commonwealth after graduation. Provided further; That each applicant shall produce to the said State Superintendent of Public Instruction a certificate from the school board or boards countersigned by the County Superintendent of the same county where he or she last taught, showing that the said applicant is a person of good moral character and has been successful as a teacher in the public schools during said term. And provided further: That said certificates shall be granted by the State Superintendent of Public Instruction after having received satisfactory evidence from the said applicants that they have complied with the requirements of this act.

SEC. 2. That the forms of application to be submitted by applicants and the certificates to be issued in accordance with the provisions of this act shall be prescribed and determined by the Superintendent of Public Instruction, and he shall have authority to annul such certificate granted by himself or predecessors in office, upon complaint

duly proven of incompetency, cruelty, negligence, or immorality on the part of the holder thereof.

SEC. 3. All acts or parts of acts inconsistent herewith are hereby repealed.

Approved the 10th day of May, A. D. 1893. ROBT. E. PATTISON.

SALARIES OF COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS. AN ACT to amend an act entitled "An act prescribing the mode of fixing the salaries of County Superintendents of common schools" approved the 29th day of April, A. D. 1878, amending the same by fixing the minimum salaries to be paid said superintendents.

SEC. I. Be it enacted by the Senate and. House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in General Assembly met, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same: That section one of an act entitled, An act prescribing the mode of fixing the salaries of county superintendents of common schools," approved the 29th day of April, 1878, which reads as follows:

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"SEC. I. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in General Assembly met, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same: That the salary of each County Superintendent of common schools elected according to law in the year one thousand eight hundred and seventy-eight and thereafter, shall be four dollars and fifty cents each for each school in his jurisdiction at the time of his election, to be paid out of the general fund appropriated for common schools; Provided, That the salary of a county superintendent shall in no case be less than eight hundred dollars nor more than two thousand dollars per annum, and in counties with over one hundred schools it shall not be less than one thousand dollars; And provided further: That conventions of school directors when assembled for the purpose of electing a county superintendent may vote him a salary greater than the amount he would receive by this act, such increase to be in all cases taken from the school fund of the county thus voting; That in all counties having over one hundred and ninety schools, or twelve hundred square miles of territory, or a school term exceeding seven and one-half months, the salaries of said superintendents shall not be less than fifteen hundred dollars," be and the same is hereby amended so as to read as follows:

SEC. 1. That the salary of each county superintendent of common schools elected according to law in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three and thereafter shall be four dollars and fifty cents for each school in his jurisdiction at the time of his election, to be paid out of the general fund appropriated for common schools; Provided, That the salary of a county superintendent shall in no case be less than one thousand dollars nor more than two thous

and dollars per annum; And provided

1893-]

OFFICIAL DEPARTMENT.

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town State Normal School, of the T hird district, for the purpose of completing and equipping the male dormitory building.

The sum of twenty-five thousand dollars was appropriated to the East Stroudsburg State Normal School, of the Fourth district, for the purpose of completing the buildings, furnishing the same, and providing the necessary library and apparatus.

further: That conventions of school directors when assembled for the purpose of electing a county superintendent may vote him a salary greater than the amount he would receive by this act, such increase to be in all cases taken from the school fund of the county thus voting; That in all counties having over one hundred and ninety schools, or twelve hundred square miles of territory, or a school term exceeding seven and onehalf months, the salaries of said superin-appropriated to the Mansfield State Normal tendents shall not be less than fifteen hundred dollars.

Approved the 23d day of May, A. D. 1893.
ROBT. E. PATTISON.

APPROPRIATIONS TO STATE NORMAL
SCHOOLS.

AN ACT making an appropriation for the State
Normal Schools of this Commonwealth.
SEC. 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and
House of Representatives of the Common-
wealth of Pennsylvania in General Assem-
bly met, and it is hereby enacted by the
authority of the same: That for the several
State Normal Schools organized and ac-
cepted as such under the laws of this Com-
monwealth, the sum of one hundred and
thirty thousand dollars be and the same is
hereby specifically appropriated for the
school year beginning the first Monday of
June, Anno Domini one thousand eight
hundred and ninety-three; and further that
a like sum be and is hereby specifically ap-
propriated for the school year beginning on
the first Monday of June, Anno Domini one
thousand eight hundred and ninety-four:
The said sums to be distributed equally
among the thirteen State Normal Schools of
the Commonwealth, and to be paid on the
warrant of the Superintendent of Public In-
struction on the receipt of the annual finan-
cial statement and the report of the several
schools.

Approved the 2d day of June, A. D. 1893.
ROBT. E. PATTISON.

ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATIONS TO NORMAL
SCHOOLS.

The sum of thirty-five thousand dollars was appropriated to West Chester State Normal School, of the First district, for the following purposes: The sum of $25,000 for the erection and completion of recitation hall and infirmary; and $10,000 for the altering and refitting of the school buildings.

The sum of forty thousand dollars was appropriated to the Millersville Normal School, of the Second district, for the fol-¦ lowing purposes: The sum of $10,000 for the completion of a building for library poses, study hall, etc.; the sum of $20,000 for the completion of a building for scientific purposes, including a chemical laboratory, and for manual training; and the sum of $10,000 for a system of electric lighting.

The sum of forty thousand dollars was

School, of the Fifth district, for the special purpose of erecting, enlarging, and remodeling school buildings and furnishing the same, and improving the sanitary condition of buildings.

The sum of fifty thousand dollars was appropriated to the Bloomsburg State Normal School, of the Sixth district, for the purpose of paying for erection, furnishing, heating and lighting of a building now in process of construction which is to supply additional class-rooms, dormitories, and a gymnasium.

The sum of fifty thousand dollars was appropriated to the Cumberland Valley State Normal School, of the Seventh district, located at Shippensburg, Cumberland county, for the purpose of erecting an additional building for the dormitories and rearranging the present building.

The sum of eleven thousand five hundred dollars was appropriated to the Central Normal School Association, of the Eighth district, at Lock Haven, Clinton county, for the purchase of land necessary to secure a full supply of water for the school, and for the erection of an engine-house wherein to provide steam-heat and power to distribute heat and light to the buildings of the institution, and to pump the supply of water, and for any machinery or attachments that may be necessary therefor.

The sum of forty-four thousand dollars was appropriated to the Indiana State Normal School, of the Ninth district, located at Indiana, Indiana county, for the following purposes: The sum of $2,000 for a new roof to present buildings; for kitchen and laundry additions, $4,000; for interior changes in present building, $1, 500; or model school building, $12,500; for boys' dormitory, $20,000; for equipment of last two additions, $4,000.

The sum of fifteen thousand dollars was appropriated to the South Western State Normal School, of the Tenth district, located at California, Washington county, to cover the deficiency of a new building already completed.

The sum of forty thousand dollars was appur-propriated to the Slippery Rock State Normal School, of the Eleventh district, located at Slippery Rock, Butler county, for the following purposes: The sum of $20,000 for completing the building now in course of erection, and the sum of $20,000 for making an extension to the ladies' dormitory.

The sum of seventeen thousand five hundred dollars was appropriated to the Kutz

In the case of each of the above appropria

tions it is provided, "That no part of the money herein appropriated shall become available until the trustees of said school shall cause a mortgage to be placed upon the grounds and buildings for the amount of money herein appropriated, to be executed to the Commonwealth, creating a lien upon the said property; Provided further: That the property of the school shall be insured for the benefit of the Commonwealth for a sum not less than two-thirds of the value of the same. The said appropriation to be paid on the warrant of the Auditor-General on a settlement made by him and the State Treasurer, but no warrant shall be drawn on settlement made until the trustees of said Normal School shall have made, under oath, to the Auditor-General a report containing a specifically itemized statement of the receipts from all sources and expenses of said Normal School, together with a specifically itemized statement of the said new buildings during the previous quarter, with the cash balance on hand, and the same is approved by him and the State Treasurer, nor until the Treasurer shall have sufficient money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated to pay the quarterly installments due said Normal School; and unexpended balances of sums appropriated for specific purposes shall not be used for other purposes whether specific or general, and shall revert to the State Treasury at the close of the two fiscal years."

The sum of fifty-five thousand dollars was also appropriated to the Clarion State Normal School, of the Thirteenth district, in the county of Clarion, for the following purposes: The sum of $35,000 for the erection and equipment of a model school building ; and the sum of $20,000 for the erection and equipment of a building for steam heating, electric lighting and laundry purposes; with the proviso: That the sum of $12,000, appropriated to said school under an act of Assembly approved the 16th day of June, 1891, shall not be drawn from the State Treasury, but be permitted to lapse and revert into the treasury upon the 1st day of June, 1893, or if it has or shall be so drawn before that time, said sum shall be deducted from the amount herein appropriated for the erection of a model school building.

SUITABLE AND CONVENIENT OUTHOUSES: HEALTH, DECENCY AND GOOD MORALS. AN ACT to require boards of school directors and controllers to provide for the better protection of the health and morals of school children in their respective school districts. SECTION 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in General Assembly met, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same: That boards of school directors and controllers shall provide suitable and convenient water closets for each of the schools under their official jurisdiction, not less than two for each school or school

building where both sexes are in attendance, in their respective school districts, with separate means of access for each; and, unless placed at a remote distance one from the other, the approaches or walks thereto shall be separated by a substantial close fence not less than seven feet in height; and it shall be the duty of the directors or controllers to make provision for keeping the water closets in a clean, comfortable and healthful condition.

SEC. 2. Any failure on the part of school directors or controllers to comply with the provisions of this act shall make them liable to be removed from office by the court of quarter sessions of the county in which the schools are located, upon complaint made to the court under oath or affirmation of not less than five taxable citizens resident in the school district in which the school is located. Approved the 6th day of Junė, A. D. 1893. ROBT. E. PATTISON.

CHILDREN OF SOLDIERS.

AN ACT relative to the admission and instruction of children of soldiers of the late war of the rebellion in the common schools of districts outside of those in which their parents, guardians, or others entitled to their custody may reside.

SEC. 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in General Assembly met, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same: That any children of any person who was a soldier in the service of the United States in the late war of the rebellion, being or who shall be temporarily or otherwise within any school district of the Commonwealth, shall upon application be entitled to admission and instruction the same as resident children in the proper common school of such district; and notwithstanding such child or children may have or shall come into such district for the purpose of attendance at such school, and the residence of the parents, guardian, or other person or persons entitled by law to the custody of such child or children be in another district. Approved the 18th day of April, A. D. 1893. ROBT. E. PATTISON.

AUDITORS IN INDEPENDENT DISTRICTS. AN ACT to provide for the election, qualification and compensation of auditors in the independent school districts of this Commonwealth. SEC. 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in General Assembly met, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same: That on and after the passage of this act there shall be elected in each independent school district of this Commonwealth three auditors, one to serve for one year, one for two years, and one for three years, and annually thereafter one each year to serve for the term of three years, to audit and adjust the several school accounts of said district.

SEC. 2. That the auditors in said independent school district shall be qualified and shall perform the duties as township and borough auditors are now required by law to do.

SEC. 3. That from and after the passage of this act the compensation of each independent school district auditor shall be two dollars per diem for each day necessarily employed in the duties of his office, which shall be paid out of the school funds of said dis

trict.

Approved the 10th day of May, A. D., 1893. ROBT. E. PATTISON.

RELATING TO CITY OF PITTSBURG.

AN ACT to prohibit member of boards of control of school districts in cities of the second class (Pittsburg) from holding any office of emolument under or being employed by said boards. SEC. 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in General Assembly met, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That from and after the passage of this act it shall be unlawful for any director or member of the board of control of school districts in any city of the second class within this Commonwealth to hold the office of Secretary of said board or be employed by said board while a member thereof in any capacity in which any compensation is attached.

SEC. 2. All laws or parts of laws inconsistent herewith are hereby repealed.

Approved the 10th day of May, A. D., ROBT. E. PATTISON. 1893.

MORE AMPLE SCHOOL ACCOMMODATIONS. AN ACT to authorize the courts of common pleas to appoint a competent person to inspect school-houses on complaint of taxable citizens of any school district in which boards of school directors or controllers have failed to provide and maintain proper and adequate school accommodations for the children who are lawfully entitled to school privileges in the district, and prescribing a penalty for neglect of duty on the part of school boards.

SEC. 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in General Asscmbly met, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same: That, whenever the school directors or controllers of any city, borough, township, or independent school district shall willfully neglect or refuse to provide suitable houses, rooms, or buildings in and for any school district within their jurisdiction and under their supervision and control, with ample room and seating capacity for the reasonable and convenient accommodation of all the school children residing within the district who may be in attendance or who desire to attend the school or schools therein, then ten or more taxable citizens, residents of the said district, may set forth in writing the facts in the case under oath or affirmation of at least six per

sons who sign the statement and petition the court of common pleas of the county in which said school district is situated, or in vacation any judge of the said court, for the appointment of a competent inspector, and the court or judge thereof may appoint such inspector whose duty it shall be to visit the district, by order of the court or judge thereof, and inquire into the facts set forth in the complaint submitted, giving due notice to the members of the board of directors against whom the complaint for neglect of duty is made, and to other persons concerned, and the said inspector shall report to the court or proper judge thereof, under oath or affirmation, of the result of his personal inspection and investigation accompanied by statements of facts and proofs obtained in the case.

SEC. 2. If after hearing the allegations and proofs offered to substantiate the charges set forth in the complaint or to disprove them, and after having fully and diligently inquired into all the facts and circumstances bearing on the case in point, the aforesaid inspector finds that the directors or controllers have refused, neglected, or failed, without valid cause for such refusal, neglect or failure on their part, to provide and maintain suitable and adequate accommodations for the school children of the district as the law requires, he shall so report to the court or to the judge appointing him, and the court in such case is hereby authorized and empowered to grant a rule upon the directors or controllers then having jurisdiction in the district, or such of them as have willfully neglected or failed without justifiable excuse to perform the duties enjoined upon them by law, to show cause why the court or the judge thereof should not remove them from office and appoint others in their stead until the next annual election for directors. Approved the 6th day of June, A. D. 1893. ROBERT E. PATTISON.

ELECTION OF TAX COLLECTORS. AN ACT to authorize the election of tax collectors for the term of three years in the several boroughs and townships of this Commonwealth.

SEC. 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in General Assembly met, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same: That the qualified voters of every borough and township in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania shall on the third Tuesday of February after the pasage of this act and triennially thereafter vote for and elect one properly qualified person for tax collector in each of said districts who shall serve for the term of three years and shall give a bond annually to be approved by the court.

SEC. 2. All acts or parts of acts inconsistent herewith are hereby repealed. Approved the 6th day of June, A. D. 1893. ROBT. E. PATTISON.

THE

COMPULSORY EDUCATION.

HE following is the veto message by Governor Pattison in disappoving the bill providing for Compulsory Education:

"In vetoing the bill in 1891, I took occasion to say: 'This legislation is the first step taken by our Commonwealth in the direction of compulsory education. That feature of a common school system involves serious political, educational and social problems. They have not yet been definitely or satisfactorily solved by the experience of other States in grappling with them; therefore it is needful that sure ground should be occupied, in order that it may be successfully maintained.'

"The State has provided, with increasing liberality, for the education of all the children of all its citizens. While it has furnished the opportunity to all, it has imposed the obligation of attendance upon none. Free attendance upon free schools seems most to befit free people. I am well aware of the necessity claimed to exist for compelling certain classes of the people to avail themselves of the opportunities offered them, but compulsory education is such an invasion upon existing systems in our Commonwealth, that, if it is to be inaugurated, it should be done under the most favorable circumstances.

"It will not avail to pass a law of uncertain character or so widely at variance with the popular sense of what is just, that it shall be a dead letter on the statute books.

"While it is true some of the more objectionable features of the act of 1891 do not appear in the present legislation, yet the purpose of it as herein sought to be enforced, presents certain aspects which in my judgment will not meet with popular approval under the most favorable conditions. This innovation upon our social and educational system is a very doubtful experiment.

"The subjection of homes and families to the espionage which it provides, the investiture of the Secretary of the School Board with the authority of a prosecuting officer, the erection of every Magistrate's office into a Court wherein parents and guardians may be arraigned for an offence against which their poverty is to be a competent plea, the imposition of a fine without any provision for its collection in case payment is refused, and the ambiguous provision that satisfactory excuse to comply with the requirements of this act shall acquit offenders under it, all tend to make the law highly objectionable, if not utterly futile.

upon the scheme of popular education in Pennsylvania, it must be done with great caution and in a manner to make it effective and to give it a fair trial. The regulation and supervision of it are in no way related to the duties of the office of Lieutenant Governor and Secretary of Internal Affairs as established by the Constitution, yet these functionaries by this law are made part of the Supervisory Board of Education, charged with the duty of enforcing the new system. Assessors are made census-takers of the school children, and teachers are required to report children of whose whereabouts they can have no possible means of information. In many districts, the number of those who are not in attendance upon the schools created and supported by the Commonwealth will be very great. To compel the teachers to inquire into the cause of their absence from the public schools, and to determine whether or not such cause is satisfactory; to require the Secretary of the School Board to hear and determine their excuses before he shall proceed to make complaint before an Alderman or Justice of the Peace; to have these Magistrates, in turn, hear and sift the cases, and finally to refer them to the Courts of Quarter Sessions, will establish a system at once so intricate, burdensome, and elaborate and expensive, that it will either break of its own weight or will be utterly neglected and ineffective.

"Satisfactory causes and satisfactory excuses are vague terms, to be construed according to the caprice of district teachers and school board secretaries. One construction will prevail in one district, and another in an adjoining township. The whole school system will be demoralized, its expense vastly increased, and in the end every heedless and irrepressible parent or guardian, for whose children the law may be intended to provide, will escape accountability to it upon the plea of poverty or other satisfactory excuse.

"From such a condition of things nothing is to be hoped for the promotion of real educational work, or for relief from illiteracy where it prevails to the public detriment. No substantial advantage to any class would ensue, and much civil strife, contention and opposition would be made possible, under the terms of this proposed law."

TEXT OF BILL VETOED.

SEC. 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in General Assembly met, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That every parent, guardian, or other person in this Commonwealth having control or charge of a child or children between the ages of eight and twelve years shall be required to send such child or children to a school in which the common English branches are taught during, at least, sixteen weeks of each year in which schools, in their respective districts, shall be in session, unless such child or children shall be excused from such attendance

"I am by no means convinced that it is in accordance with the more enlightened sentiment of this Commonwealth that a system of compulsory education should be established, nor has the experience of other Commonwealths justified the expectation that compulsory education brings healing on its wings for the ills of the body politic. Whenever such a system is to be engrafted by the board of the school district in which

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