Page images
PDF
EPUB

CHICAGO, ILL., September 4, 1867. SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt this day of your letter of the 2d instant, with printed “instructions” and form of monthly report. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect.

CHICAGO, ILL., September 7, 1867. SIR: Your letter of the 5th instant, respecting survey of the hospital lot, is received, 3 p. m.

The survey will be made in the early part of next week and results forwarded. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect.

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, September 16, 1867. SIR: After inquiry and consideration I submit that the best course to be pursued in the construction of the new marine hospital at this place is, first, to erect a small office on the site for the use of the superintendent, a clerk, and master mechanics. Second, to build a boarding house for the mechanics employed, there seeming to be no means of providing subsistence and accommodation otherwise. Third, to open the trenches and put in as much of the foundation as possible before the coming of frosty weather.

The estimate of funds herewith submitted is based on the above project.

The only considerable doubt as to the best method of carrying out this project relates to the procuring of the stone for the foundation. Inquiry of the principal dealers in stone developed the fact that but one or two of them would bid at all for that material, and none would bid to deliver it on the site. This necessitated examination of the road, with consideration of best points to land the stone from the river, as also the possibility of delivering it by railroad at a point about one and a half miles west of the 'site. This last was on the whole considered best, and on Friday last I visited Joliet and conferred with Mr. Sanger, owner of the best quarry at that place, who is supplying the stone for the Rock Island arsenal. The quality and terms are satisfactory, but it seems, from information received at the railroad offices this morning, that it will be difficult to get any cars for some weeks, but as the estimate ought not to be longer delayed, send it forward, hoping by further inquiries to do better than therein intimated, Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. D. WEBSTER, Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect, &c.

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, September 17, 1867. DEAR SIRS: Neither the St. Louis nor the Northwestern railroad will give me the slightest encouragement that they will furnish any cars for transportation of stone from your quarry before the press of the fall business is over, when it will be too late for use this fall. I am now considering whether I can haul from some point on the river where canal boats can deliver. In the meantime, it is my impression that if you should quarry a quantity of stone, such as would be wanted for the new marine hospital, (say 400 cords,) that I could purchase it of you after navigation closes, as I can then get cars to bring it to Belle Plain and teaming will be cheaper. I wish I could be more definite than this, but I am in some uncertainty as to the extent of the discretion that will be allowed me. Very respectfully,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent (New) Marine Hospital. Messrs. SANGER & STEEL,

Island Quarry, Joliet, Illinois.

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, September 19, 1867. SIR: The gravel on the lake shore of the hospital lot is very much worn and rounded, so much so that it is doubtful whether it will make good concrete. As stone must be brought from Joliet or Athens, will it not be better to make the foundations of that material at once!

The sand of the site is so incompressible that no difficulty will arise from commencing the foundation with stone directly upon it.

I enclose herewith a copy of a letter addressed on the 17th instant to Messrs. Sanger & Steel, proprietors of an excellent quarry at Joliet. I think that would be a considerable saving by procuring the stone for the basement story during the winter, as I can then get cars on the railroad, and the hauling from the railroad to the site will be cheaper, both on account of the better condition of the roads and the less cost of team work. The office is now nearly completed.

The lumber for the boarding house is purchased and being delivered. The survey of the lot is going, on though not as rapidly as I could wish, owing to the delay caused by depending upon the street cars for transportation to the site.

It will be necessary to have a horse and light wagon to transport messengers and small articles of supply as called for.

It will also be necessary to have a well dug at once, as water cannot be procured from the when the wind is easterly.

Work on the foundation, if commenced this fall, will probably be stopped by frost in the latter part of October or early in November, so that not much can be accomplished at any rate the present season.

I would request specific instructions at your earliest convenience on this point, or permission to commence or postpone at my discretion.

As to the stone, it may be necessary to explain that no quarrying is done at the Joliet or Athens quarries in winter, as the stone crumbles if exposed to a freezing temperature before some days of seasoning, so that if we are to take advantage of the superior facilities for transportation in winter the order for quarrying must be given very soon, as intimated in my letter to Messrs. Sanger & Steele. Very respectfully,

J. D. WEBSTER, Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect, Washington, D. C.

SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE, U. S. MARINE HOSPITAL,

Chicago, September 26, 1867. SIR: I transmit herewith my bond as superintendent United States marine hospital at this place, with certificates of sufficiency of the sureties by the United States judge, and am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. D. WEBSTER, Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect.

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL,

September 30, 1867. SIR: Your letter of the 26th instant is received. I had intended to enclose with my letter of the 18th a list of prices of stone from the Joliet quarry of Messrs. Sanger & Steel, but it seems to have been acci. dentally left out. I enclose it herewith. I fear I was not sufficiently explicit to be understood on other points. The stone can be delivered by rail at Belle Plain, a station on the Milwaukee division of Northwestern railroad, but not until after the present press of business is over, and then, as I have ascertained since my last letter, at a charge of $17 per car-load of one and a half 6 cords," estimated to weigh ten tons. This I deem altogether too high, unreasonably so. We had better get it by canal and river, and haul it four miles, instead of the one and a halt, from Belle Plain. Adopting this latter plan I have tried to buy stone in the 6 market” here, but the dealers are so fully employed that I could not get an offer for anything but “ rubble,” of a quality which would not answer at all for any portion of the cellar or foundation walls which is to show above ground. The eight hour movement checked building in the early part of the season, and there is now a corresponding hurry, and the stone dealers are behind their orders. The business is in the hands of a very few firms. The common rubble stone would not make neat masonry, although used irrespective of courses; indeed, it will be cheaper, probably, to lay it in courses. I have had a great deal of talk with the masons and quarrymen, and have had more difficulty than I could have supposed possible in arriving at a clear conclusion as to what is the best method to pursue. But I am now pretty well convinced that in the condition of the quarries as it now is, it will be best to order stone for the exterior of the basement walls, which they do not denominate rubble; to have this delivered at the dock (four miles from the site) in such sizes as we can handle without the erection of derricks, (which would cost some hundreds of dollars each ;) to erect sheds at the site and hammer-dress the stone during the winter. This mode will bring this portion of the work more into central than it will be after the busy season of the spring opens, and will require a less number of hands to be employed on the work while laying. There are no accommodations for men in the vicinity, and I am building a boarding-house, but I wish to keep all that within the smallest practicable limits. But I fear I should be tedious if I should recount all the reasons for the course I now advise, but I am very desirous to show a good job” at the lowest cost. I propose getting a few loads of stone by boat, (20 cords to a load,) and commence dressing them at once. I do not despair of getting some better terms from the railroads after awhile than $17 per car, and if I succeed in that I can continue work to good advantage all winter. I expect to hear again in the course of — from Mr. Sanger offering better terms than specified in his price list, herewith sent, and will telegraph you as desired.

In the mean time permit me to request that you will be very full in the expression of your ideas of how the work is to be carried on in all particulars. When instructions are so definite as to leave no room for any discretion on my part, it relieves me from embarrassment, as I desire to follow your directions minutely, and not to urge my own views except in matters not specifically provided for.

My ideas about the stone are founded upon a personal examination of the quarry, and of many buildings in this city, made in company with an excellent mason, of much experience, and of a character for integrity second to none. I am, very respectfully,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent, A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect.

U. S. MARINE HOSPITAL, SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE,

Chicago, September 30, 1867. SIR: It may be well for me to explain my views as to the near future of the work under my charge a little more fully than was done in my letter of this forenoon.

I have completed a small building for an office, and have now under construction a boarding-house and a carpenter shop. In the latter I propose to employ a small number of men (say 15 or 20) in getting out doors, door and window casings, sash, &c. These will not be wedged up, but merely put together and laid up to season, to be finished as wanted.

This is the best way, in my judgment, to insure good joints. In the universal hurry which prevails here, it is difficult to get seasoned lumber, and what is so-called rarely fails to show evidence of imperfection in that respect. This work, together with that of dressing the stone for the face of the basement walls in the area and above ground, will be well worth the time bestowed upon it, even if we cannot commence the foundations at once. The lower rates of wages in winter will also conduce to economy. Very respectfully,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect.

[Telegram.]

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, October 1, 1867. A. B. MULLETT, Esq., Supervising Architect, Washington, D. C.:

I can get rubble for five dollars a cord, and face-stone for thirty-six cents per superficial foot, at quarry; transportation to site about eight dollars per cord of 13,000 pounds, in time to commence soon.

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent.

MARINE HOSPITAL, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS,

October 2, 1867. SIR: In explanation of my telegram of yesterday in regard to stone, I would say that it was sent after an interview with Mr. Sanger. No other dealer in the market seemed disposed to furnish any stone except the common rubble. I have all along regarded my negotiations with him and other parties as being strictly of the nature of efforts to purchase in the market” to supply an immediate need, and I am satisfied that the knowledge acquired may be made fully to pay for the time spent in getting it. Whatever we may do this fall, it would be quite practicable to get the building under roof the next season, Indeed, I have only of late been able to see the facts of the case in such a light as to enable me to advertise for stone in a way to meet the modes of doing business here, so as to draw out bids in the shape most advantageous to government. I presume also that, in response to the regular advertisement, Mr. Sanger would give somewhat better terms than he now offers. He is getting out the stone for the Rock Island armory, and likes the government as a customer. I do not know what General Rodman is paying him ; perhaps you could ascertain from the War Department.

When the quarrymen get far enough into a quarry to get stone of a uniform color, suitable for face-stone, they would prefer to furnish it in large sizes; so large that we should have to erect derricks at the dock or railroad station and at the work. I therefore proposed to Mr. Sanger that he should break up the stone at the quarry into sizes which can be handled without machinery, and furnish the face-stone in pieces 20 to 30 inches in length, 8 to 12 inches in thickness, and not less than 10 inches in width, (or bed,) and one-half 16 inches, so that every other course can have six inches of bond back into the wall; no veneering.

Here your despatch of this date was received. I have taken measures to open the trenches and do what can be done before frost shall stop operations. Very respectfully,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent Marine Hospital. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect, Washington, D. C.

U.S. MARINE HOSPITAL, SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE,

Chicago, Illinois, October 5, 1867. SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt (on yesterday) of your letter of the 2d instant, with amended plan of the foundation of the hospital.

I am still in doubt whether the basement shown therein is to be altogether under ground, except in the central portion, which seems to be provided with an area. Are the wing portions of the basement to have windows above the ground ? I have located the building, but the conditions imposed by the sections of the walls are necessary to be known. The section on the drawing does not show the contemplated ground surface. I am, very respectfully,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect.

« ՆախորդըՇարունակել »