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will add something to the cost. There are none to those of the main (or centre) building. I have not received the new form for monthly reports. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent. A. B. MUĻLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect.

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL,

Chicago, Illinois, August 25, 1868. SIR: Your letter of the 20th instant is received. In connection with the directions therein given, I have a single suggestion to submit to your consideration and decision. The rock face and drove margin directed for the architraves of the windows will be more expensive than a sawed surface, (given by machinery,) which I had proposed to use before I received your letter. The proportion of cost is as 28 for the sawed to 45 for the rock face and drove margin. After inquiring as to price in market of the machine stone and estimate cost of rock face, &c., I submit that it will be better to go on with the machine-finished stone, though I should prefer the rock face as a matter of taste.

I also acknowledge the receipt of the new form for monthly reports. Am I to understand that you desire me to go back and repeat the reports of the past year in this form, or to commence with it for the current month. The blanks are not yet receieved. Very respectfully,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintenden. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect, Washington, D. C.

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL,

Chicago, Illinois, August 8, 1868. SIR: I transmit by to-day's mail the photographic views of this building taken on the 3d instant, in accordance with instructions on that subject. Very respectfully,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent, A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect, Washington, D. C.

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL,

Chicago, Illinois, October 22, 1868. SIR: Your two letters of the 19th instant are received.

As to the progress of the building to the first instant, I have to state that at that date the outer walls of the south wing were up to the top of the entrance story and ready for the joists; those of the centre were up to the top of the basement, and the water-table laid thereon. On the west front of the north wing the water-table was laid, half the window. jambs set, and the piers commenced. The cross wall (brick) of the wings were up with the outer ones, and those of the centre some six feet higher. Most of the caps for the windows of the wings were cut, and rubble to complete the story ready for laying. More rapid progress could have

been easily made if dimension stone for the window-jambs, and caps, &c., could have been procured more readily. We are buying in the market, and have to take our chances with others, and the supply is not at all in advance of the demand.

I shall have great pleasure in calling the attention of the gentlemen you mention to the character and wants of the work. Very respectfully,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect, Washington, D. C.

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL,

Chicago, November 30, 1868. SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt this day of your instructions of the 27th instant for closing up operations on this work. I have been working a reduced force for some time past, with a view of closing so soon as the walls should be in good condition for covering. A few days' work now will effect this. The stone cutters are discharged this evening. I am, very respectfully,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect.

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL,

Chicago, December 17, 1868. SIR: Immediately after the receipt of your order of the 27th ultimo, to close operations on this work, a snow-storm occurred, succeeded by quite cold weather, whereby the preparations for winter were somewhat retarded. On Saturday, the 12th instant, however, I was able to discharge all the mechanics and laborers. The master mechanics were retained one day longer to close up their matters in charge. The exterior walls and most of the cross walls were carried up to the level of the joists (or belting course) of the main story, so that they were readily covered on one level, for defence against the weather. Everything is in good condition, except a small quantity of lumber, which ought to be re-piled when the snow will permit. While the walls were being carried up thus I kept the small force of carpenters at work to put some sash, which were on hand, in better condition for storing. I was not able, however, to get them complete. I have now in employment one night and one day watchman, and a teamster, the latter being retained to take charge of the horses, which I am not aware I have any authority to sell. Please instruct me on this point at your earliest convenience. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect. P. S.—The horses are in good condition, but it is an unfavorable time for selling. There is on hand nearly forage enough to carry them through the winter,

W .

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL,

Chicago, December 22, 1868. SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 19th instant, informing me of the suspension of my pay during the winter, &c. I regret very much that such a retrenchment should seem necessary; but if an equally rigid rule can be applied all round, I shall concur. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect.

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL,

Chicago, Illinois, December 23, 1868. SIR: As to the suspension of my pay during the winter I beg leave to say that it causes serious inconvenience to me, inasmuch as I had made arrangements in reference to living which I should not have made had I not relied on the supposed practice of the department to continue the pay during my charge of the building, and liability under my bond. The suspension takes me by surprise, at a most inconvenient and expensive season. Is it wrong for me to feel, under such circumstances, that I had a right to expect the continuance of the pay, or timely notice to the contrary? I submit these considerations through you to the notice of the department. I am, very respectfully,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,'

Supervising Architect.

U.S. MARINE HOSPITAL, SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE,

Chicago, January 15, 1869. SIR: In accordance with the request of your letter of the 11th instant, I yesterday had an interview with Mr. White, of the Tribune. He disclaimed any intention to make any charge beyond that of violation of the law requiring the plans to be kept within the appropriation. This morning he returns to the subject and cites the law. If he is correct in his quotation it seems to me that the true line of defence in the case is to state the custom heretofore prevailing in such matters, and, while frankly admitting that the special law in this individual case has been accidentally overlooked, to set forth the impossibility of building a hospital at all adequate to the present and prospective wants of this port for any such sum as that appropriated. I make this suggestion as prompted by my first impressions upon reading the law as quoted by the Tribune this morning. Mr. White's attention was drawn to the matter during a recent visit to Washington by some members of Congress, and upon that prompting, I think, he wrote the first article. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent. A. B. MULLETT, Esq.,

Supervising Architect.

Extract from report of Secretary of the Treasury for the year 1865.

Experience has shown, and former secretaries have at various times and with entire unanimity represented to Congress, that the system of public marine hospitals maintained and managed by the government is the least economical method that has been devised for the administration of this fund, and affords the least comparative benefit to the seamen. The expenses of these establishments are large, independently of the number of seamen received in them. When the patients are numerous, the average rate of expense per man is not unreasonable ; but where they are few, as at most of the public institutions, the expense per capita is very largely in excess of the cost of maintaining them under contract at private, State, or municipal institutions, where they would be better accommodated at an expense exactly proportioned to the services rendered.

Mention may be made, in illustration, of one of these public hospitals which is maintained at an annual expense of upwards of $4,000, and which accommodates an average of less than a single patient, at a daily cost per capita of more than $14 50, while quite as satisfactory relief can be had under contract for about $1 per day. There are, moreover, several hospital buildings erected at great cost now lying idle, out of repair, and not available for their intended use. Some of these have never been occupied, and one, at least, is situated at a point remote from any port, and where relief is never demanded. Others, now occupied, are in a condition requiring large and immediate outlay to preserve them.

In view of these facts, it is strongly recommended that authority be conferred by law upon this department to sell such hospitals as experience has shown are not needed, retaining only those situated at iniportant ports where, by the course of commerce, demands for relief are likely to be most frequent and pressing, and where contracts, on favorable terms, cannot be procured with private or municipal institutions. The proceeds should either be returned into the treasury in repayment of their cost, or invested for the benefit of the hospital fund.

In favor of the contract system, it may be remarked that it is in operation most successfully at New York, where demands for relief are far the heaviest; at Baltimore, Philadelphia, St. Louis, Louisville, and Cincinnati; and it is believed that quite as advantageous and satisfactory arrangements might be made at other ports where government hospitals are now located. Even at ports where it may be deemed best to retain the ownership of the hospital buildings it might be advisable to lease them to private or municipal hospitals, which would gladly receive the seamen on favorable terms. Such an arrangement was formerly in force at Charleston, South Carolina, much to the advantage of the patients and the fund.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, April 25. 1866. SIR: Under the act of June 20, 1864, (13 Stat., p. 142,) the Chicago marine hospital was sold at public auction to Mr. J. F. Joy, September 5, 1864, for $132,000, one-fourth of which was paid on the same day, and the balance subsequently, by instalments, with interest.

Influenced by the considerations presented in my last annual report, the department has not deemed it best to erect a new building at Chicago, and is, consequently, debarred by the terms of the above-mentioned act from giving to the purchaser that possession to which he is justly entitled.

To redress the grievance under which Mr. Joy thus labors the accom

panying resolution has been prepared, and is respectfully commended to the attention of Congress.

Even should Congress choose to direct the constructing of a new hospital there, it would not be just to postpone still further Mr. Joy's right until the new building shall be completed. I am, sir, very respectfully,

H. MCCULLOCH, Secretary. Hon. E. B. WASHBURNE,

Chairman Committee on Commerce, House of Representatives. JOINT RESOLUTION to enable the sale of the marine hospital at Chicago to be completed.

Be it resolved, &c., That the last clause of the second section of the act authorizing the sale of the marine hospital and grounds at Chicago, approved June 20, 1864, which provides for the retention by the United States of possession of the said hospital and grounds until & new hospital be built, be, and the same is hereby, repealed.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, November 14, 1866. DEAR SIR: I enclose herewith copies of letters from J. F. Joy, esq., and the Attorney General to this department, and of the department to Mr. William H. Chappell, in relation to the marine hospital site, from which you will see that after every effort on my part to obtain a piece of property for that purpose, the desired result is apparently as remote as ever.

The Attorney General having declined to approve the title to the lot of Messrs. Chappell and Boon, I am unable to take any further action towards completing the purchase of that property until his objections are removed, which appears at present to be impossible.

I believe you will agree with me that Mr. Joy has a right to complain of the loss and inconvenience to which he had been subject by the provisions of the law authorizing the sale of the old marine hospital property, which debars this department from affording him relief except by purchasing a site and erecting a new hospital.

All efforts to accomplish this having failed, I desire to call your attention to the case in the hope that you may be able to aid me in procuring a suitable site and in obtaining authority from Congress to place Mr. Joy in possession of the property he has paid for. Very respectfully, yours,

H. MCCULLOCH, Secretary. Hon. LYMAN TRUMBULL,

Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, December 19, 1866. SIR: In accordance with the resolution of the 17th instant

That the Secretary of the Treasury communicate to this house what progress has been made in the erection of the new marine hospital at Chicago, provided for in the law author. izing the sale of the old one, and if a site has been purchased, state of whom, when, and the price thereof, with the estimate of the cost of the buildingI have the honor to transmit herewith a communication from the supervising architect of this department that contains the information desired. Very respectfully,

H. MCCULLOCH,

Secretary of the Treasury. Hon. SCHUYLER COLFAX,

Speaker House of Representatives.

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