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PROPOSALS FOR BRICK AND STONE. Proposals will be received at the office of the superintendent of the United States marine hospital at Chicago, Illinois, until 12 o'clock m., - 1867, for furnishing and delivering at the site of the building 250,000 best fint bricks; the same must be well burned, free from all marl or lime, and perfectly sound, of a fine surface and even color, and none will be accepted unless perfectly satisfactory to the superintendent. Each proposal must be accompanied by a sample of the bricks proposed, and properly marked with the name of the bidder, and must be submitted before the opening of the bids.

Also, at the same time and place, for furnishing and delivering 1,600,000 common hard-burned brick for partition walls and backing; they must be sound and well burnt, no attention being paid to color.

Proposals will also be received for furnishing and delivering at the same place about 32,000 superficial feet of stone for the facing of the upper walls of said building, the same to be in random courses, but invariably laid on quarry bed; three-quarters of the stone facing to have an average thickness of six (6) inches, and one-quarter of the same to be ten (10) inches or over, and to be paid for by the superficial foot, measured in the wall.

All bids must be accompanied by the bond of two responsible persons, in the sum of $2,500, that the bidder will accept and perform the contract if awarded to him.

The department assumes the right to reject any or all bids, if deemed for its interest to do so. The delivery of the above material to begin -, and the whole to be delivered by the —

- Superintendent.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, October 8, 1867. Sir: I have to acknowledge the receipt of yours of the 5th instant, and to say in reply that the wing portion of the building will have windows one light high above ground; the central portion will have areas front and rear, as shown on drawings. The concrete beds will be eight feet eigth inches below the surface of the ground throughout. The basement plans and section of walls will be sent you in a few days. Very respectfully,

B. OERTLY,

Acting Supervising Architect. General J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent U. S. Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, October 12, 1867. SIR: I have this day returned from a short trip to the east and find accounts current for the month of September of the work under your charge awaiting me. To say that I am astonished at the salaries you have been paying your master mechanics would scarcely express my feelings. I find you pay your master carpenter $8 per diem, yet the wages in Chicago are no higher than here. The master carpenter of the treasury extension, who has a larger force of men under his charge than is employed under any superintendent of construction, and whose duties are more arduous than any, at present receives but $6 per diem. The master mason, having three foremen under his charge, viz., of brick work, stone work, and granite cutters, receives the same compensation. The other master mechanics receive but $5 50 per diem. Our superintendents througout the entire west, among whom are Colonel A. Schwartz, at Springfield, J. C. Rankin, esq., at Cairo, S. V. Shipman, esq., at Madison, Wisconsin, and A. F. Knight, esq., at St. Paul, Minnesota, all of whom are educated gentlemen and accomplished architects, receive but $6 per diem. Their foremen, in no case, receive over $5 50 per diem, which is believed to be ample.

An exception was made in regard to your salary alone at the sugges. tion of Dr. Ray, that the building being so far from your office it would be necessary for you to keep a horse at your own expense.

I have, therefore, to say that your action in paying the salaries above referred to is disapproved, and that in future you will report in all cases the necessity for any master mechanics, foreman, or clerk, with the salary proposed, for approval. In the mean time you will not pay over six dollars ($6) per diem for any master mechanics you may need. An allowance of a higher price would, in my opinion, be an insult to the gentlemen above named.

In your letter of the 5th instant you say, “I am still in doubt whether the basement shown therein is to be altogether under ground except in the central portion." I think you must have overlooked or misunderstood the paragraph in my letter, transmitting the section in which I said, “The bottom of the trenches for the concrete will be eight feet eight inches below the level of the ground in the main front of the building."

To put it in other words, the level of the main floor will be 5 feet 10 inches above the ground, the level of the ground to be taken opposite the main entrance. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLET,

Supervising Architect. General J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent U.S. Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, October 12, 1867. SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt of yours of the 7th instant, and to say in reply that your views as to the rubble work are entirely satisfactory, and coincide with my own exactly. Please proceed with the work on that basis, economizing to the fullest extent. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. General J, D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent U. 8. Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, October 15, 1867. SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your account of disbursements upon the United States marine hospital at Chicago during September, 1867. It is observed therein that the wages paid the master carpenter and the master mason are excessively large, not only $2 to $2 50 per diem more than is paid here or elsewhere for similar services,

but more (except in special cases) than is allowed to superintendents, and the department deems it to have been your duty, under section 10 of your instructions, to have declined payment to them at the rates named on pay-roll as being " not at fair and proper prices."

You will in future please govern yourself strictly by your instructions upon this point, and in all cases when the prices for labor and materials on vouchers certified by the superintendent for payment appear to be extravagant or not fair and proper, you will decline to pay the same and report your action to the department. Your attention is also called to section 7 of your instructions requiring that payments will only be made upon vouchers “ signed by the person to whom the amount is due," or by some one authorized to "sign his name and receive the money” under a power of attorney, which must accompany the voucher.

Vouchers Nos. 3 and 6 do not conform to this requirement and are accordingly returned for correction. Very respectfully,

H. MCCULLOCH,

Secretary of the Treasury. W. B. SCATES, Esq.,

Disbursing Agent, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, October 18, 1867. SIR: I have the pleasure of transmitting you herewith the plans of the foundations and the basement story of the marine hospital under your charge, with sections and elevations of that portion of the building, that will, I think, give you all the information you need before the receipt of the remainder of the plans, which I trust will be soon. I am trying to get the whole of the plans completed, and hope to be able to pay you a visit early next year, when I trust we may be able to arrange for a speedy and successful prosecution of the work the coming season.

The work below the water table is to be of rubble range work, but the thickness of the courses must be determined by the stone you procure.

Trusting you will find these plans full and explicit enough, I remain yours, very truly,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. General J. D. WEBSTER,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, October 22, 1867. SIR: The superintendent's estimate of funds required upon the Chicago, Illinois, marine hospital, for the month of October, has been received, together with your requisition. As they fail to show the amount of funds already on hand and the amount actually required to be remitted, they are accordingly retained for correction.

Your attention is also called to the department letter, of the 15th instant, relative to the wages of the master carpenter and master mason employed upon the work, it being observed that they are named in the estimate submitted at the same rates as heretofore, which cannot be allowed. Very respectfully,

J. F. HARTLEY,

Assistant Secretary of the Treasury. WALTER B. SCATES, Esq.,

Disbursing Agent, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, October 24, 1867. SIR: Enclosed please find copy of the Washington Chronicle, containing your advertisement for stone and brick for the new marine hospital under your charge.

In my letter of the 5th instant, instructing you to advertise, I specified the Chicago Tribune and Times as the papers in which it was to be inserted. I cannot believe that you would exceed your instructions, at least not without good cause, much less that you would, in any case, advertise in a paper so distant and in which its insertion would be of no value to any person beyond the proprietors of the paper.

I will thank you to inform me by return of mail if its insertion was authorized by you. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, October 28, 1867. SIR: The estimate of J. D. Webster, esq., superintendent United States marine hospital, at Chicago, Illinois, for funds necessary for the prosecution of the work for the month of October, 1867, in amount $9,865 50, has been received and this day referred to the proper officer for remittance of $9,850 from the appropriation for the construction of that building, a draft for which will probably reach you within 10 days. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. WALTER B. SCATES, Esq.,

Disbursing Agent, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, October 29, 1867. SIR: In reply to your letter transmitting estimate and requisition for funds for the Chicago marine hospital, for October, 1867, I have to say that it is necessary that such estimates of funds required should be made out at the commencement of each month, and exhibit, as near as can be estimated, the total amount of the expenses for the entire month, from which should be deducted the amount on hand at closing the previous month's account, thus leaving the balance necessary to be remitted.

Relative to the per diem pay of the master mason and carpenter, the department sees no reason to change its decision as made known to you in letters of the 15th and 22d instants. You will, therefore, decline to pay these employés at the rates named in the estimate ($8 per day) until so advised by the department. Very respectfully,

J. F. HARTLEY,

Assistant Secretary of the Treasury. W. B. SCATES, Esq.,

Disbursing Agent, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, November 4, 1867. SIR: Yours of the 30th ultimo, in relation to the compensation paid the master carpenter and stone mason on the marine hospital under your charge, is received.

In reply I have to say that I have submitted your letter to the Secretary of the Treasury, as you desired. He fully approves my decision. I have, therefore, to say that the department cannot consent to waive the rules under which all its buildings are now being erected, and I have to repeat that you will not pay over six dollars per diem for the master carpenter or master mason, as we are employing first-class master mechanics at rates not exceeding that sum, at various points where the wages of ordinary mechanics are as high as at Chicago.

The instances you quote fail to change my mind. As I am not personally in any other work in Chicago, I have no objection to capitalists pay. ing any price they please. I can assure you, however, that if I were a stockholder in the railroad you refer to, I would, if your information is correct, apply for an injunction to prevent the directors expending my money in such a manner. I have considerable acquaintance with Chicago and Chicago prices, and feel sure you can employ persons fully competent for these duties at the price specified. I am aware that the building is somewhat extensive, but the work is by no means complicated, and is of a simple character. It must be obvious to you that a fine cut-stone structure of smaller size would require far more attention and supervision than a building of rubble masonry, and that your greatest difficulties will be connected with a supply of material.

The proverb you quote is founded, in my opinion, on the fallacy that there must be waste somewhere, but I do not believe that any such necessity exists; if so, the combined leakages of the various spigots” under my supervision will equal that of quite a respectable “bung."

I desire to be as liberal as the rules of the department will permit, and, therefore, have not objected to your employment of a clerk, though no other superintendent in the west is allowed one; and, to show you that such is my feeling, I have to say further that, if you deem it necessary, you may give the master carpenter the rank of assistant superintendent, with a compensation not to exceed seven dollars per diem, with the understanding that he performs all the duties of master carpenter and assumes the general supervision of the work during your absence. This is the most liberal arrangement that can be made. The price you propose to pay a clerk is entirely satisfactory.

In conclusion I desire to say that if you are unable to procure competent master mechanics at the price specified I can send you some, and that no imputation on your integrity or capacity is or has been made by me. The department, however, must be the judge of the course most advantageous to the public interests. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, November 15, 1867. SIR: Yours of the 11th instant, enclosing proposals for brick, is received. In reply I have to say that your recommendations in regard to awarding the contract are approved. I have also to express my grati

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