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TREASURY DEPARTMENT, October 24, 1867. SIR: Enclosed please find copy of the Washington Chronicle, containing your advertisement for stone and brick for the new marine hospital under your charge.

In my letter of the 5th instant, instructing you to advertise, I specified the Chicago Tribune and Times as the papers in which it was to be inserted. I cannot believe that you would exceed your instructions, at least not without good cause, much less that you would, in any case, advertise in a paper so distant and in which its insertion would be of no value to any person beyond the proprietors of the paper.

I will thank you to inform me by return of mail if its insertion was authorized by you. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, October 28, 1867. SIR: The estimate of J. D. Webster, esq., superintendent United States marine hospital, at Chicago, Illinois, for funds necessary for the prosecution of the work for the month of October, 1867, in amount $9,865 50, has been received and this day referred to the proper officer for remittance of $9,850 from the appropriation for the construction of that building, a draft for which will probably reach you within 10 days. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. WALTER B. SCATES, Esq.,

Disbursing Agent, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, October 29, 1867. SIR: In reply to your letter transmitting estimate and requisition for funds for the Chicago marine hospital, for October, 1867, I have to say that it is necessary that such estimates of funds required should be made out at the commencement of each month, and exhibit, as near as can be estimated, the total amount of the expenses for the entire month, from which should be deducted the amount on hand at closing the previous month's account, thus leaving the balance necessary to be remitted.

Relative to the per diem pay of the master mason and carpenter, the department sees no reason to change its decision as made known to you in letters of the 15th and 22d instants. You will, therefore, decline to pay these employés at the rates named in the estimate ($8 per day) until so advised by the department. Very respectfully,

J. F. HARTLEY,

Assistant Secretary of the Treasury. W. B. SCATES, Esq.,

Disbursing Agent, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, November 4, 1867. SIR: Yours of the 30th ultimo, in relation to the compensation paid the master carpenter and stone mason on the marine hospital under your charge, is received.

In reply I have to say that I have submitted your letter to the Secretary of the Treasury, as you desired. He fully approves my decision. I have, therefore, to say that the department cannot consent to waive the rules under which all its buildings are now being erected, and I have to repeat that you will not pay over six dollars per diem for the master carpenter or master mason, as we are employing first-class master mechanics at rates not exceeding that sum, at various points where the wages of ordinary mechanics are as high as at Chicago.

The instances you quote fail to change my mind. As I am not personally in any other work in Chicago, I have no objection to capitalists paying any price they please. I can assure you, however, that if I were a stockholder in the railroad you refer to, I would, if your information is correct, apply for an injunction to prevent the directors expending my money in such a manner. I have considerable acquaintance with Chicago and Chicago prices, and feel sure you can employ persons fully competent for these duties at the price specified. I am aware that the building is somewhat extensive, but the work is by no means complicated, and is of a simple character. It must be obvious to you that a fine cut-stone structure of smaller size would require far more attention and supervision than a building of rubble masonry, and that your greatest difficulties will be comected with a supply of material.

The proverb you quote is founded, in my opinion, on the fallacy that there must be waste somewhere, but I do not believe that any such necessity exists; if so, the combined leakages of the various “spigots” under my supervision will equal that of quite a respectable “bung.”

I desire to be as liberal as the rules of the department will permit, and, therefore, have not objected to your employment of a clerk, though no other superintendent in the west is allowed one; and, to show you that such is my feeling, I have to say further that, if you deem it necessary, you may give the master carpenter the rank of assistant superintendent, with a compensation not to exceed seven dollars per diem, with the understanding that he performs all the duties of master carpenter and assumes the general supervision of the work during your absence. This is the most liberal arrangement that can be made. The price you propose to pay a clerk is entirely satisfactory.

In conclusion I desire to say that if you are unable to procure competent master mechanics at the price specified I can send you some, and that no imputation on your integrity or capacity is or has been made by me. The department, however, must be the judge of the course most advantageous to the public interests. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, November 15, 1867. SIR: Yours of the 11th instant, enclosing proposals for brick, is received. In reply I have to say that your recommendations in regard to awarding the contract are approved. I have also to express my gratification at the result, and to say that I consider the proposals very satisfactory.

Some modifications have been made in the plans that reduce our estimate to 1,200,000 bricks. I think, therefore, you had better prepare the contracts for that amount, with the privilege of purchasing such addi. tional brick as may be needed, at the same price. I send blank forms of contracts, which please have executed in triplicate, and forward for the formal approval of the department. Your acceptance of the contract will, however, be final.

As regards the stone, while I regret that we did not obtain any proposals, it does not in any manner embarrass the decision, as you can now purchase in open market, having failed to receive any response to your advertisement. I have nearly decided to build the superstructure of stone. The architectural effect will be finer, and I do not think the cost will be as great as pressed brick.

I will, therefore, thank you to see at what rate you can contract for all the stone required for the outer walls of the superstructure, and the best rates at which you can obtain the best Milwaukee pressed brick, and advise me with any suggestions in regard to the matter you deem advisable. I should be glad if you could obtain definite proposals in regard to the stone, as I desire to close this question at an early date.

I should feel much obliged if you could forward the survey of the property. If the surveyor cannot complete it without any further delay I do not want him to complete it at all.

I am anxious to get the drawings for the engine-house and the outbuildings commenced as soon as possible. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

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TREASURY DEPARTMENT, November 16, 1868. SIR: The estimate of J. D. Webster, esq., superintendent of construction of United States marine hospital, Chicago, Illinois, for funds required for the prosecution of the work for November, 1867, in amount $4,424, has been received and this day referred to the proper officer for remittance, a draft for which will probably reach you within 10 days. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. WALTER B. SCATES, Esq.,

Disbursing Agent, Chicago, Illinois.

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TREASURY DEPARTMENT, November 26, 1867. SIR: Yours of the 21st instant is received. In reply I would say that I have carefully examined the cost of the various items of work as described therein, and the prices and results are entirely satisfactory considering the difficulties you have experienced. I am also much pleased to learn that you have succeeded in securing all the foundations before the arrival of winter.

· As regards the stone, I can see no objection to making the wall of stone, but the inner lining must be of four-inch brick, leaving a hollow space between the stone wall and brick lining of two and three inches. The lining will of course be omitted in the basement story except in the centre portion, where I should prefer to have the air space preserved, though I believe it was omitted on the plan sent you. I leave this to you.

I am very desirous that the cost of the building should be kept as low as practicable. I shall therefore be glad of any suggestions from you that will enable me to economize as far as possible on the stone-work. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, December 10, 1867. SIR: Yours of the 2d instant is received. In reply I have to say that your report is entirely satisfactory. I note your remarks in regard to setting the carpenters at work, and have to say that I hope to send you the drawings of the windows for the basement story in a very few days, when you can commence on them without delay.

The complete set of plans for the building will be sent you as soon as they are ready, which I hope will be very soon. Every effort has been made to complete them, but we have been so pushed with business it has been impossible to do so sooner. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, December 14, 1868. SIR: Your accounts of disbursements for construction of United States marine hospital at Chicago, Illinois, for the months of October and November, 1867, have been received and this day referred to the First Auditor for examination and settlement. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. WALTER B. SCATES, Esq.,

Disbursing Agent, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, January 6, 1868. SIR: Enclosed please find drawings of the basement windows, which will give you work for your carpenters until the balance of the drawings can be forwarded.

I can see no objection to your absence, as suggested, at this time of the year. You will of course make such arrangements as will be necessary to keep the work moving in good style.

I have to return the contract for brick, with the request that you will have the contractors affix a 25-cent revenue stamp to the bond, when you will please return it. I am aware it is rather a small matter, but the Solicitor will not certify to it or the Secretary approve of it without. By the way, I suppose the contractor is aware that the contract is of no value without the written approval of the Secretary. It is usual for him to approve all the copies, but if he is satisfied I am.

I shall be glad to hear from you in regard to the stone for the building, and the price of Milwaukee brick, as an early decision is indispensable to enable me to complete the plans. Please advise me what are the best terms you can make for the rubble stone for the exterior of the entire building, and the price for the dimension stone required. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, January 24, 1868. SIR: Herewith I return incomplete contract (triplicate) between yourself as superintendent of construction of United States marine hospital at Chicago, Illinois, and Thomas Moulding and Edward Harland, of Lake View, Illinois, for furnishing 1,200,000 common brick.

An error occurs, as you will perceive upon examination, of the omission of the word “themselves,” in the first clause of the agreement, whereby the contract is utterly vitiated. (Solicitor declining to approve.)

Please cause the proper correction to be made and duly noted thereon, returning the contracts for completion and final approval. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, January 25, 1868. SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt of yours of the 18th instant, and to say that I am satisfied from your report that rubble stone will be the most desirable material of which to construct the exterior walls of the marine hospital under your charge.

I am, however, of the opinion that you contemplate the use of a more costly quality of stone than I propose to use. Above the water table I do not wish to use range-work but broken range-work, which I even pre

fer to continuous range-work. The stone will do from four or five to 12 · inches thick, and need not be of larger size than can be handled by a couple of men without derricks.

Please ascertain what are the best terms on which you can procure stone of this description, and advise me, when instructions will be given. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

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