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TREASURY DEPARTMENT, February 1, 1868. SIR: Yours of the 25th ultimo is received. In reply I have to say that I presume that what is called in your city broken ashlar," is what I mean by “ broken range-work." I, of course, could not know what the relative cost of range rubble and broken range rubble masonry in your city was, but as far as my knowledge extends, the latter is by far the cheapest. The difference is to be attributed, I presume, to the unrivalled facilities your quarries furnish for the supply of stone of uniform thickness of bed.

I will therefore say that I desire the stone work below the water table to be range rubble to give the base as massive a character as is compatible with the character of the structure. The superstructure I desire to be of good rubble masonry, and to economize to the fullest extent that a due regard to the quality of the work will permit. I shall therefore be glad to hear your views on the subject, and to avail myself of your practical knowledge of the best and most economical method of using Joliet stone. Please advise me if an early decision is in your opinion advantageous, as I intend visiting you early in the spring, and if there is no necessity of an early action I will consult with you in person before making a definite decision. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Iliinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, February 5, 1868. SIR: Euclosed please find duplicate and triplicate of contract and bond as executed between yourself as superintendent marine hospital, Chicago, and Thomas Moulding and Edward Harland, of Lake View, Illinois, for furnishing 1,200,000 common brick. The same having been examined and found correct and approved by the Secretary of the Treasury.

One copy you will please deliver to the contractors, retaining the other for your office, the original being reserved for file in this office. Very respectfully,

A. B MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, February 7, 1868. SIR: Yours of the 1st and 3d instant have been received. In reply I have to say that I have decided to visit your city in the spring, and we will therefore postpone a decision on all questions that do not require immediate action.

Your report of the 3d instant is the first intimation I have had that you had any intention of purchasing machinery, and I regret that you did not advise me before making the purchase.

In future you will please confer with this office before making any expenditure not contemplated by your instructions; this being the invariable rule. I trust in this case that the results will justify the purchase.

Your promise to obtain all the information possible in regard to the price of material, &c., before my arrival is also noted with pleasure. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, February 11, 1868. SIR: I received a visit yesterday from Mr. Steele, of the firm of Sanger & Steele, of Joliet, Illinois, who called in relation to the stone work for the marine hospital under your charge. I showed him the plans and specifications, and find that the difference of terms in use in our respective localities has caused a misunderstanding as to the quality of the work and the kind of stone I desire to use for the superstructure.

Mr. Steele assures me that what I call “broken range rubble" is known as “ block rubble” in Chicago. He informs me that the contracts they have taken for dimension stone will leave them an unusually large amount of “block rubble” and common rubble on hand, and that his firm is anxious to make a contract for supplying a large quantity of each, and he made the following proposal, which I have informally accepted, viz:

He will supply the building material of the new marine hospital, to be erected at Chicago, at the following prices, delivered aboard cars or boat, at our quarry, viz:

For block rubble, $8 per cord of 128 feet.
For common rubble, $4 67 per cord of 128 feet.
For dimension stone, 45 cents per cubic foot.
For flagging, 45 cents per superficial foot.

I propose, therefore, to construct the outer walls of stone, using block rubble on the exterior, and common rubble for the backing, which will give about one-third of the former to two-thirds of the latter, and make a durable and cheap wall.

Please let me know what you think of the proposal at your earliest convenience. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, February 29, 1868. SIR: Yours of the 24th instant, in relation to the proposal of Sanger & Steele to furnish stone for the marine hospital under your charge, is received.

In reply I have to say that I am glad to learn that you think the block rubble can be obtained at even a lower price than proposed by them. Their proposal, however, was for selected stone of the best quality and uniform color. The dimension stone included the cornice, belt courses, window-sills, and the two-story verandas, which will be entirely of stone and require those of extra size.

The whole of the plans of the stone work will be forwarded you in a

few days, when you can judge as to the price asked by Messrs. Sanger & Steele. Meantime I have to request you to have a contract prepared for the rubble and block rubble at the best rates you can get, not to exceed that of Messrs. Sanger & Steele. You may, if you deem it desirable, include the dimension stone, and forward it for the approval of the department.

The informal acceptance of their proposal, of which I wrote you on the 11th instant, was simply a verbal statement that the department would accept it provided you considered their offer an advantageous one and not above the lowest market rates.

You will therefore oblige me by closing the contract for stone at once, making the best terms you can. I feel sure we now fully understand each other as regards the kind and quality of work desired. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, February 29, 1868. SIR: Yours of the 24th instant in regard to the doors, windows, &c., for the new marine hospital under your charge is received. In reply, I have to say that I should prefer to have them made by contract if I could by any means insure first-class workmanship and thoroughly seasoned lumber; but as I fear that is impracticable, I think the best way is to get seasoned luinber and have all the dressing, sawing, and moulding done at a mill, (or, as you have bought some machinery, by its assistance,) and get the work all out, but not put it together until it is needed, by which means all danger from imperfect seasoning of the lumber will be avoided as far as possible. I shall be glad to hear from you on the subject, and remain, Yours, very truly,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, February 29, 1868. SIR: I called the attention of the First Comptroller to the advertisement for your building, issued in the Chronicle without authority, but the case noted in the enclosed decision of that officer, covering a broader ground, was selected as the basis of his opinion.

From it you will see that the publishing of your advertisement has not the least countenance in law, and the voucher of the Chronicle will not be paid. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, March 3, 1868. SIR: Enclosed please find detail drawings of all the windows of the marine hospital under your charge, being drawings Nos. 20, 21, and 22, which will give you employment for your carpenters until the remainder of the drawings can be forwarded, which will, I trust, be in three weeks at the furthest. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Superrising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, March 9, 1868. SIR: I have to request you to prepare and forward to me at the earliest possible moment a programme of operations for the coming season on the building under your charge, advising me of the materials, &c., already provided for, and those for which provision must be made, with your recommendations on the best course to be pursued.

The time for commencing operations being already at hand, an early reply is necessary, upon receipt of which full instructions will be given you. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, March 16, 1868. SIR: Your requisition for funds, in amount $350, for prosecution of work on the United States marine hospital at Chicago, during March, 1868, has been received, and this day referred to the Commissioner of Customs for remittance. A draft therefor will probably reach you within ten days. Very respectfully,

B. OERTLY,

Acting Supervising Architect. WALTER B. SCATES, Esq.,

Disbursing Agent, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, March 20, 1868. SIR: Yours of the 13th instant is received. In reply I have to say that your general programme of operations is approved, and I am glad to hear that the weather will permit you to commence work without delay, as it will be hard work to get the building under roof this fall, as I hope we shall succeed in doing.

The plans of the entire building are being completed as rapidly as possible, and will be forwarded to you at the earliest moment, with full instructions as to advertising for lumber, &c. Either the assistant architect or myself will visit you soon, when all doubtful questions can be explained, and a plan of operations for pushing the work vigorously,

decided upon, which will, I trust, prevent any delay. As soon as the plans are received I shall feel obliged if you will see Sanger & Steele and close the contract for stone with them, if you can agree as to terms. If not, please make other arrangements if you can procure any that are satisfactory.

As soon as the plans reach you I think you had better purchase the first tier of joist at the best rates you can get, to avoid any delay, but I think it would be advisable to advertise for the balance of the lumber.

The slate it would be well for you to advertise for early in the summer. The builders' hardware, nails, &c., I think, perhaps, you can purchase better in open market than in any other way, but I should be glad to have your opinion on the subject. You have certainly authority to procure all the labor that may be needed, and to purchase any material that may be necessary for the progress of the work.

Yours of the 14th instant in relation to a scroll saw is also received. In reply I have to say that I am doubtful of the advantages of running machinery on our own account, and should on that account have probably decided against the purchase of any; but as you appear to be provided with the power, and all other machinery you need, I presume it may be well to purchase the saw as recommended. I have, therefore, approved the suggestion, and hope you will find your expectations of the advantages of having machinery on the ground to be all you anticipate. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, March 28, 1868. SIR: Your requisition for additional funds required for service on inarine hospital, Chicago, Illinois, in amount $1,482 50, has been received and this day referred to the Commissioner of Customs for remittance of 31,500 from the appropriation for that work. A draft for this amount will probably reach you within ten days. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. W. B. SCATES, Esq.,

Disbursing Agent, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, April 4, 1868. SIR: You are hereby instructed to proceed without delay to Springfeld, Ill., Des Moines, Iowa, Chicago, Ill., and St. Paul, Minn., and to examine the progress of work on the buildings now being erected at those points under the supervision of this office, viz: The United States court-house and post office buildings at Springfield and Des Moines; marine hospital at Chicago, and custom-house at St. Paul.

You will carefully examine the work done and report fully in each case as to its quality--if in accordance with plans and specifications, and will examine carefully into the management of the work, and especially into the manner in which it is conducted by the superintendent, both as to economy and rapidity. You will go over the plans with the superintendents and explain any difficulties that may exist in their ninds.

H. Ex. Doc, 100— 5

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