Page images
PDF
EPUB

Your attention is also particularly called to the importance of the observance of the utmost economy in the erection of these buildings, to attain which you will please make a careful examination of the amount of work done, the cost of the same, and will prepare estimates of the probable cost of each building under the superintendent in charge.

You will please prepare your report as far as practicable on the spot and forward it by mail, and accompany it by any suggestions you may deem proper and calculated to promote the efficiency of the work. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. R. C. RANKIN, Esq.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, April 6, 1868. SIRS: Enclosed please find an order for iron beams which you will please deliver without delay to J. D. Webster, superintendent United States marine hospital at Chicago, Ill. Those for the first floor will be needed by the middle or end of the present month; the others you will please forward as soon as practicable, and not later than the 20th May. You will please forward duplicate bills to this office for the amount. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. UNION IRON WORKS,

Pittsburg, Pennsylvania.

Schedule of iron beams required for the Cnited States marine hospital at Chicago, Illinois. FIRST FLOOR.

1 beam, 20 feet 2 inches long, 12 deep.

3 beams, 12 feet 2 inches long, 9 deep. 18 beams, 13 feet 4 inches long, 9 deep. 1 beam, 8 feet long, 9 deep. 5 beams, 20 feet 4 inches long, 9 decp. 1 beam, 6 feet 10 inches long, 9 deep. 2 beams, 15 feet 6 inches long, 9 deep. 2 beams, 15 feet 4 inches long, 9 deep. 1 beam, 15 feet 4 inches long, 9 deep. 4 beams, 13 feet 5 inches long, 9 deep. 1 beam, 11 feet 10 inches long, 9 deep, 2 beams, 12 feet 6 inches long, 9 deep.

FOURTH FLOOR. 1 beam, & feet long, 9 deep.

16 beams, 13 feet 4 inches long, 9 deep. 4 beams, 13 feet 5 inches long, I deep. 2 beams, 19 feet 8 inches long, 9 deep.

1 beam, 20 feet 2 inches long, 12 deep. SECOND FLOOR.

2 beams, 15 feet 4 inches long, 9 deep.

2 beams, 12 feet 6 inches long, 9 deep. 16 beams, 13 feet 4 inches long, 9 deep.

1 beam, 8 feet long, 9 deep. 2 beams, 17 feet 4 inches long, 9 deep.

12 beams, 13 feet 5 inches long, 9 deep. 4 beams, 20 feet 2 inches long, 9 deep.. 3 beams, 12 feet 2 inches long, 9 deep.

FIFTH FLOOR. 1 beam, 8 feet long, 9 deep.

16 beams, 16 feet long, 9 deep. 2 beams, 15 feet 4 inches long, 9 deep. 4 beams, 13 feet 5 inches long, 9 deep.

2 beams, 18 feet long. 9 deep.

2 beams, 15 feet 4 inches long, 9 deep. THIRD FLOOR.

2 beams, 5 feet 1 inch long, 9 deep.

BOX GIRDERS. 16 beams, 13 feet 4 inches long, 9 deep. 2 beams, 14 feet 9 inches long, 9 deep. girder, 16 feet long, 12 by 8 deep.

[graphic]

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, April 8, 1868. SIR: Yours of the 4th instant is received ; in reply I have to say that you have received the plans ere this by the hands of Mr. Rankin. The remaining drawings and specifications will be forwarded in a very short

time. I deeply regret the delay that has occurred in completing them; but if you could see the amount of business in this office you would not be surprised. I have in this case been particularly annoyed by the slowness and delays in the preparation of the plans. I believe, however, that they are practically completed and that I shall be able to forward all in a few days. Meantime you will please proceed according to your own judgment and the instructions of Mr. Rankin, reporting your action to me. As regards the banding of the brick and stone work, I think you had better use a sufficient number of anchors of such size as you may deem proper; I can see no particular advantage in galvanizing them. Of the number of anchors required you are the best judge. I think with a little care you can also band the brick and stone work together considerably by occasionally projecting a suitable stone into the brick-work, and vice versa. As regards the scaffolding, I do not think outside scaf. folding necessary, and believe you will not need it, as I desire to avoid any unnecessary expense. However, as I am very anxious that the walls should be plumb and well built, I leave the decision of that question to your good judgment. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent United States Marine Hospital, Chicago, Ill.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, April 9, 1868. SIR: Yours of the 8th instant is received. In reply I have to say that I think your suggestion a good one. You will therefore furnish the 10 beams (light) instead of the nine beams ordered for the Chicago marine hospital. Please furnish them at the earliest possible moment and oblige. Yours respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. ANDREW CARNEGIE, Esq.,

President Union Iron Works, Pittsburg, Pa.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, April 9, 1868. SIR: The estimate of J. D. Webster, esq., superintendent of United States marine hospital, Chicago, Illinois, for funds required for prosecution of work during April, 1868, in amount $12,009 25, has been received and this day referred to the Commissioner of Customs for remittance of $12,000 from the appropriation for erecting above building. A draft for the amount will probably reach you within 10 days. Very respectfully,

· A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. WALTER B. SCATES, Esq.,

Disbursing Agent, Chicago, Illinois.

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, April 9, 1868. SIR: Enclosed please find specifications for stonemason and cut-stone work for the building under your charge. This specification will remain

in force until otherwise ordered by the supervising architect, or until a printed copy of specifications are furnished you. You will use all diligence in the prosecution of the work and exercise the utmost economy in all the departments of labor, always preferring strength and durability of execution to appearance. Should any improved method of carrying out the details of the work suggest itself to you, not in violation of the spirit of the plans or specifications, you will adopt such method, provided that no extra expense is involved in so doing, reporting your action to the supervising architect. You will carry up exterior walls of first story two feet thick, the second story 20 inches, and the third story 18 inches thick. All of the inside doors will be one and three-fourth inches thick and outside doors two and one-half inches thick, the lock rails will be 10 inches deep. The conductor pipes will be carried down outside of the walls or inside of hot air flues. Very respectfully,

J.C. RANKIN. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, April 14, 1868. SIR:I am in receipt of a communication from J. C. Rankin, eso.. assistant architect of this department, in regard to the work under your charge, and presume that you will be gratified to learn that he speaks in a very complimentary manner of the work performed under your supervision and of your management of operations. He further advises me that you are disposed to construe the drawings and instructions somewhat too strictly. I desire to say that I shall be glad to receive any suggestions from you at any time, particularly any that will reduce the cost without changing the spirit or general design. I desire to avail myself of your experience and knowledge of local advantages and disadvantages to be derived from the mode or the nature of the materials to the fullest extent, and am only anxious that the building should be when completed a model institution both in design and workmanship, and be erected at the lowest possible cost.

Mr. Rankin advises me that he has directed you to construct the stone-work of the outer walls of the first story two feet in thickness, reducing it in the upper stories. This suggestion is approved so far as regards the first story, and the material of which the walls of the upper story should be composed is left entirely to your discretion. The drawings for a brick wall faced with stone were made as a question of economy, and based on the prices of stone furnished by you before I made myself fully understood as to the quality of work required. I much prefer a stone wall faced with four inches of brick, with an air space of two to four inches. If you find a two-inch space difficult to preserve with a stone exterior wall, there is no objection to increase it slightly.

As regards the down spouts, I believe that Mr. Rankin's recommendation, that they be carried down the outside, will be the most feasible and cheapest. You will therefore adopt it. The remainder of the plans will be forwarded to you in a day or two, and the specifications on Mr. Rankin's return. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, April 14, 1868. Sir: I send you by to day's express tracings of drawings Nos. 3, 25, and 26 of the building under your charge, which completes the entire set, with some trifling exceptions. Please acknowledge receipt of same. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent U. S. Varine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, April 24, 1868. SIR: Yours of the 21st instant, requesting authority to lease a whart on which to land material for the building under your charge, at a cost not exceeding $1,200 per annum, is received

In reply I have to say that if you are decidedly of the opinion that it will be to our advantage to lease the wharf, you are hereby authorized to do so at the price above mentioned. The price appears to me pretty high, but I must leave the matter to you.

In regard to the questions raised during Mr. Rankin's visit to your city, I have to say that the wrought-iron beams are correct throughout. Those on drawing No. 15 are as shown on enclosed tracing. All other questions will be answered by the specifications. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, April 28, 1868. Sir: Yours of the 25th instant, in regard to the girders at the junctions of the piazza, is received. In reply I have to say that you will take no action with regard to them until the receipt of the working drawings and specifications, which will be sent you very soon. Very respectfully,

B. OERTLY,

Acting Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent I. s. Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, May 4, 1868. SIR: Yours of the 230 ultimo is received. In reply, I have to say that I have no apprehensions as to the strength of the walls at the angles of the towers, if constructed of the dimensions shown on plans. Your suggestion, also, to change the windows from double to single ones, would really change the whole design, and entirely destroy the effect obtained by their grouping. The weight of the tanks, when filled, will only be in the neighborhood of 12,000 pounds, not sufficient, in my opinion, to endanger the structure in the least, or warrant a change in the desigu. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT.

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent U. S. Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, May 5, 1868. SIR: I beg to enclose you drawing for cast-iron girders, to carry stone flagging of end piazza. You can have them made in Chicago, reporting to me the price at which you can have them delivered at the hospital site. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent U. s. Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, May 13, 1868. SIR: Your account of disbursements on the marine hospital at Chicago, Illinois, for the month of April, 1868, has been received. Herewith find voucher No. 8, returned for correction, the receipt thereto not bearing the actual signature of the payee, as required in section seven of your instructions. You will please cause this to be remedied, and return the corrected voucher to the department for settlement in your account. Very respectfully,

EDMUND COOPER,

Acting Assistant Secretary. WALTER B. SCATES, Esq.,

Disbursing Agent, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, May 21, 1868. SIR: The estimate of J. D. Webster, esq., superintendent marine hospital, Chicago, for funds required for the work for May, 1868, in amount $9,073, has been received and this day referred to the Commissioner of Customs for remittance of $9,100 from appropriation for above work. A draft for the amount will probably reach you within ten days. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. W. B. SCATES, Esq.,

Disbursing Agent, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, May 28, 1868. SIR: Herewith I transmit for the files of your office a triplicate receipted voucher in favor of the Pittsburg Union Iron Works, amounting to $3,981 36, being in payment for wrought-iron beams furnished for the work under your charge.

A remittance of the amount due has been made direct from the department. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent U. 8. Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

« ՆախորդըՇարունակել »