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TREASURY DEPARTMENT, June 8, 1868. SIR: Yours of the 3d instant is received. I note your remarks that the “ falling off in the quality of the block rubble will necessitate the buying of more dimension stone for building stone and corners, which will carry up the cost considerably," and have to say that you will please take proper steps to compel Messrs. Sanger & Steele to execute their contract promptly and to the letter.

I do not propose to give them a contract for good block rubble, and then use dimension stone in order to make the inferior stock delivered available. Neither do I care whether they have been able to fulfil their contract or not, or whether they made the contract in good faith or not. Your duty is to see that all contracts are complied with promptly and faithfully, and the department expects you will do so.

In this connection ( desire to call your attention to the fact that you have not executed and forwarded a contract for the rubble and block rubble for the approval of the Secretary, as directed in my letter of the 29th February last; you will please do so without delay.

You say that you " ought to have authority to purchase stone in the market at the best rates you can get, as you can make a considerable saving.” In reply I have to say that if you can purchase stone of satisfactory quality in the open market cheaper than you contract with Messrs. Sanger & Steele, you can do so, provided the contractors fail to deliver it as rapidly as you desire, and as required by the contract. You will not, however, purchase at higher rates or use any more dimension stone for the purpose of supplying deficiencies in the quality of the rubble stone furnished you. Please advise me fully in regard to this. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent U. 8. Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, June 12, 1868. Sir: Your account of disbursements for construction of United States marine hospital at Chicago, Illinois, during the month of May, 1868, has been received, and this day referred to the First Auditor for examination and settlement.

The estimate of the superintendent for funds required for the work during the month of June, 1868, in amount $8,776 49, has also been received, and this day referred to the Commissioner of Customs for remittance of $8,700 from the appropriation for the above work. A draft for the amount will probably reach you within ten days. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. WALTER B. SCATES, Esq.,

Disbursing Agent, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, June 15, 1868. • SIR: Yours of the 11th instant is received. In reply I have to say that I regret that you did not understand my meaning and close up the contract with Messrs. Sanger & Steele. As, however, their proposal was accepted, the contract is binding and they must complete it according to understanding. They are honorable business men, and I have no doubt will do so, notwithstanding the quarrymen's strike, for which this department is not responsible. I regret that after so long a time and so much correspondence the matter is not settled, and trust you will be able to make a satisfactory arrangement.

I omitted to ask you in my previous letter why you had changed your opinion as to the economy of using brick instead of stone; please advise me. Meantime I wish to impress on your mind the necessity of driving the work, as I am extremely anxious that the building should be under roof this season. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, June 25, 1868. SIR: Yours of the 18th instant is received. In reply, I have to say that the cost of brick-work at the prices brick were offered must certainly be more than the cost of stone-work at the prices stone was offered by Messrs. Sanger & Steele—at least, that is the result of our calculations. I will thank you to make a careful estimate of the cost of the block rubble walls of the superstructure per cubic foot, and the cost of the best Milwaukee brick laid in the walls, and forward it by return mail. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, July 8, 1868. SIR: I have to call your attention to the following act of Congress approved June 25, 1868, viz:

Be it enacted, &c., That eight hours shall constitute a day's work for all laborers, workmen, and mechanics vow employed, or who may be hereafter employed, by or on behalf of the government of the Unlted States, and that all acts or parts of acts inconsistent with this act be, and the same are hereby, repealed.

And to say that, in accordance with its provisions, on and after the receipt of this · letter eight hours will constitute a day's work on the building under your charge. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

. Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent U. S. Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, July 10, 1868. SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your report for June, 1868, and to call your attention to the fact that it and each of your former reports are not in accordance with the requirements of this office, which it is necessary you should comply with strictly in order to enable me to ascertain fully and correctly the progress of the work under your super. intendence, amount of each item of work done and cost, amount of labor and cost, &c. You will, therefore, please prepare and forward, without delay, full reports of all work performed on the building, monthly, since the commencement, viz., for the months of September and October, 1867, February, March, April, May, and June, 1868.

Full and complete reports have been required of all superintendents under control of the department, and is not intended as an indication of any dissatisfaction with your management, but to furnish the necessary data for the records of this office. To enable you to understand more fully what is required, I enclose you printed instructions to superintendents and circular form No. 8. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, July 10, 1868. SIR: In answer to yours of the 29th ultimo and 2d instant, relating to block rubble stone, and comparative cost of ranged block rubble work, and brick work, with Milwaukee brick facing, I have to say that I am much disappointed, and unable to comprehend the reason of the great excess of cost of block rubble masonry, as shown by your figures and the calculation of the office, based on the proposal of Sanger & Steele to deliver the stone aboard cars at quarry at 8 cents per foot; its cost, at site, including freight and hauling, cannot certainly be more than 20 cents per foot cube for block, and 16 cents for common rubble, and ought not to cost over 50 cents, or, at the most, 60 cents, per cubic foot when laid in lime mortar, or rather less than the cost of brick-work, inclusive of the Milwaukee facing. The proposal of Messrs. Sanger & Steele to furnish common and block rubble at $7 and $12 per car-load, respectively, was accepted as much for the sake of economy as for appearance, a wall of that material being not only handsome but more durable.

I can only account for the discrepancy between our figures by supposing that you have done better work than was contemplated by me. My intention was to use only such block rubble as was actually necessary for the facing and a proper front, and to back and fill the balance with ordinary rubblestone, avoiding all cutting. Late experiences at Madison, Wisconsin, Springfield, Illinois, Cairo and Des Moines, Iowa, and other places, gave the cost of first-class rubble work at from 30 to 40 cents per cubic foot, inclusive of labor and all materials, allowing for the decreasing thickness of the walls and increase in their height, as well as for coursing the stone. I still think you can do the work in as good a style as I intended, and as is necessary, for not over 60 cents per cubic foot. I notice that you speak in your letters of using dimension stone in the walls. I proposed to use dimension stone only for the belt courses, &c., and fear that you are doing work that would suit me admirably if the appropriation could afford it, which, unfortunately, is not the case. I do not wish you to use brick if it can be avoided.

Please examine the case fully, and report at the earliest moment if the cost of the work cannot be reduced by abandoning the use of dimension stone and reducing the quality of the work, and, at the same time,

was accepted, the contract is binding and they must complete it according to understanding. They are honorable business men, and I have no doubt will do so, notwithstanding the quarrymen's strike, for which this department is not responsible. I regret that after so long a time and so much correspondence the matter is not settled, and trust you will be able to make a satisfactory arrangement.

I omitted to ask you in my previous letter why you had changed your opinion as to the economy of using brick instead of stone; please advise me. Meantime I wish to impress on your mind the necessity of driving the work, as I am extremely anxious that the building should be under roof this season. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architert. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, June 25, 1868. SIR: Yours of the 18th instant is received. In reply, I have to say that the cost of brick-work at the prices brick were offered must certainly be more than the cost of stone-work at the prices stone was offered by Messrs. Sanger & Steele-at least, that is the result of our calculations. I will thank you to make a careful estimate of the cost of the block rubble walls of the superstructure per cubic foot, and the cost of the best Milwaukee brick laid in the walls, and forward it by return mail. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, July 8, 1868. SIR: I have to call your attention to the following act of Congress approved June 25, 1868, viz:

Be it enacted, &c., That eight hours shall constitute a day's work for all laborers, workmed, and mechanics now employed, or who may be hereafter employed, by or on behalf of the government of the Unlted States, and that all acts or parts of acts inconsistent with this aci be, and the same are hereby, repealed.

And to say that, in accordance with its provisions, on and after the receipt of this letter eight hours will constitute a day's work on the building under your charge. Very respectfully,

A. B, MULLETT,

. Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent U. S. Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, July 10, 1868. SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your report for June, 1868, and to call your attention to the fact that it and each of your former reports are not in accordance with the requirements of this office, which

it is necessary you should comply with strictly in order to enable me to ascertain fully and correctly the progress of the work under your super: intendence, amount of each item of work done and cost, amount of labor and cost, &c. You will, therefore, please prepare and forward, without delay, full reports of all work performed on the building, monthly, since the commencement, viz., for the months of September and Octo. ber, 1867, February, March, April, May, and June, 1868.

Full and complete reports have been required of all superintendents under control of the department, and is not intended as an indication of any dissatisfaction with your management, but to furnish the necessary data for the records of this office. To enable you to understand more fully what is required, I enclose you printed instructions to superintendents and circular form No. 8. Very respectfully,

A. B. MULLETT,

. Supervising Architect. J. D. WEBSTER, Esq.,

Superintendent Marine Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, July 10, 1868. Sir: In answer to yours of the 29th ultimo and 2d instant, relating to block rubble stone, and comparative cost of ranged block rubble work, and brick work, with Milwaukee brick facing, I have to say that I am much disappointed, and unable to comprehend the reason of the great excess of cost of block rubble masonry, as shown by your figures and the calculation of the office, based on the proposal of Sanger & Steele to deliver the stone aboard cars at quarry at 8 cents per foot; its cost, at site, including freight and hauling, cannot certainly be more than 20 cents per foot cube for block, and 16 cents for common rubble, and ought not to cost over 50 cents, or, at the most, 60 cents, per cubic foot when laid in lime mortar, or rather less than the cost of brick-work, inclusive of the Milwaukee facing. The proposal of Messrs. Sanger & Steele to furnish common and block rubble at $7 and $12 per car-load, respectively, was accepted as much for the sake of economy as for appearance, a wall of that material being not only handsome but more durable.

I can only account for the discrepancy between our figures by supposing that you have done better work than was contemplated by me. My intention was to use only such block rubble as was actually necessary for the facing and a proper front, and to back and fill the balance with ordinary rubblestone, avoiding all cutting. Late experiences at Madison, Wisconsin, Springfield, Illinois, Cairo and Des Moines, Iowa, and other places, gave the cost of first-class rubble work at from 30 to 40 cents per cubic foot, inclusive of labor and all materials, allowing for the decreasing thickness of the walls and increase in their height, as well as for coursing the stone. I still think you can do the work in as good a style as I intended, and as is necessary, for not over 60 cents per cubic foot. I notice that you speak in your letters of using dimension stone in the walls. I proposed to use dimension stone only for the belt courses, &c., and fear that you are doing work that would suit me admirably if the appropriation could afford it, which, unfortunately, is not the case. I do not wish you to use brick if it can be avoided.

Please examine the case fully, and report at the earliest moment it the cost of the work cannot be reduced by abandoning the use of dimension stone and reducing the quality of the work, and, at the same time,

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