International law; definition of States; recognition of States; sovereignty; territorial limits of national jurisdiction

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1906

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Fundamental rights and duties
23
The Holy See 18
39
Nature and functions 492
41
2 Military occupation 21
46
Pacific intercourse of belligerents
47
3 The Confederate States 22
53
RIGHTS AND DUTIES OF STATES
60
Revolution in Texas
62
CHAPTER III
67
President Jacksons message December 21 1836
98
The Confederate States 38
103
Delegation of the South African Republics
107
Conditions of intervention
109
Recognition of European States 41
110
Recognition of new governments
119
Central America 50
145
Venezuela
148
4 Dismissal 640
149
Recognition of belligerency
164
Possession of the captured property 1224
165
Prisoners of
166
MARITIME
168
Unofficial intercourse the American Revolution
170
Revolution in Texas 62
176
Rights and duties of ministers
182
Mexico 65
184
The Confederate States 66
185
A belligerent right 1266
188
2 Quarantine
191
Cuba 67
194
Colombia 68
200
Breach of blockade
204
Of belligerency 74
205
Acts falling short of recognition
206
Treatment of the wounded 1134
207
Hayti
216
Landing of submarine cables
227
Of new governments 73
235
Laws of various countries
242
Recognition by whom determinable 75
245
CONTINUITY OF STATES
248
CHAPTER IV
255
Treaty relations 821
273
Cases of Enterprise and Ilermosa
279
Treaty of 1830 866
281
Morocco and other Barbary powers
282
Real estate protocol 1874 868
286
Revolution 90
301
Mexico
304
Selfdefense
315
Nationality of vessels
321
Fourteen Diamond Rings
329
Germany 823
331
Great Britain
332
The Netherlands 44
334
On public obligations 96
335
Rights and duties
339
Ameliorations
350
Hawaiian debt
351
Santo Domingo
363
Spanish argument
367
Kiel Canal
371
Grounds of intervention
376
Naturalization
377
On contracts and concessions 98
385
2 Exceptions
389
Nationality of married women
408
Cutting of cables 1176
409
Naturalization internationally ineffective as to absent family
416
Foreignborn children
426
1 Prior to 1868
432
Limitations as to trial
439
Annexation of Texas
446
Prisoners 1177
451
Ukase of 1821
465
Loss of right to national protection
474
Seamen
484
The Koszta case
490
To whom issued
495
Applications
503
Protest of Japan and its withdrawal
511
Commercial intercourse
514
Foreign residence of naturalized citizens
517
Spanish West Indies except Cuba Philippines and Guam 109
520
Duration of passports
523
Treaty of peace 17823
531
Attitude of the United States
539
Disabilities
541
Instructions to Admiral Kimberly
546
Military service
547
Doc 551 III
555
Exclusion of Chinese
567
Republic of Texas 963
571
Extradition a national act
579
Treaties
589
Rauscher case
597
7 Islands of Culebra and Culebrita 122
601
Irregular recovery of fugitive
603
Evidence
611
CHAPTER V
612
TERRITORIAL LIMITSContinued
615
Expenses
620
The Mississippi
625
2 Provisions for individual election 380
639
INTEROCEANIC COMMUNICATIONS
652
Relations with the Navy
656
Straits of Magellan
664
Police regulations
669
Revival of annexation project
678
Ceremonial
681
Classes and titles
696
Marginal
698
CHAPTER VIII
699
Marginal
700
2 Position of the United States 145
706
Freedom of the seas
708
Damages
716
Powers and duties
717
Shipping and seamen
725
Declarations of maritime
733
Power to make
734
Bristol Channel
739
Argentine Republic
781
AustriaHungary
782
Barbary powers 1 Early relations
783
Algiers
784
Morocco
785
Tripoli
786
Tunis
787
Belgium
788
Bolivia
789
Brazil
790
Central America 1 Costa Rica
791
Honduras
792
Guatemala
793
Nicaragua
794
Salvador
795
Chile
796
China 1 Treaty of 1844
797
Treaties of 1858
798
Treaty of 1868
799
Immigration and other treaties 18801894
800
Taxes
801
Industries
802
Travel
803
Missionary privileges and protection
804
Purchase of land
805
Treaty ports and foreign settlements
806
Leases to European powers
807
Boxer movement 1 Siege and relief of legations
808
2 Negotiations for settlement
809
Controversies of 18861888 167
810
Open door policy 1 The Hay agreement
811
2 AngloGerman agreement
812
Territorial integrity neutrality
813
Colombia
814
Congo
815
Corea
816
Denmark 817
817
XIV Dominican Repubļic
818
XV Ecuador 819
819
1 Historical sketch
826
2 Particular stipulations
827
MonroePinkney and cognate negotiations
828
Treaty of Ghent
829
Treaty of 1815
830
Naval forces on Great Lakes 1817
831
Fisheries convention 1818
832
Indemnity for slaves 1822
833
WebsterAshburton treaty
834
Oregon treaty S
835
ClaytonBulwer treaty
836
Reciprocity treaty of 1854
837
Treaty of Washington 1871
839
Canadian relations
840
The Queens jubilee
841
American naturalization
842
Hayti
843
Italy
844
Japan 1 Early attempts to negotiate
845
Perrys successful mission
846
Harris treaties and Japanese embassy
847
Domestic disturbances
848
Affair of Shimonoseki
849
Convention of 1866 and treaty revision
850
Emancipation of Japan
851
Liberia 1 Declarations of American policy
852
Treaty of 1862 Art VIII
853
Relations with Great Britain
854
Relations with France
855
Madagascar
856
Mexico 1 Relations 18251848
857
Treaty of GuadalupeHidalgo
858
Mesilla and later treaties
859
Domestic disturbances intervention
860
Later relations
861
Zona Libra or Free Zone
862
Crossing of border by cattle
863
H Doc 551 V
865
Extradition treaty
869
Educational eleemosynary and religious institutions
870
Schools
871
Sale of books
872
Freedom of worship
873
Armenian difficulties
874
Seal fisheries
875
Paraguay
876
Persia
877
Peru
878
Portugal
879
Russia
880
Samoan Islands
881
Siam
882
Treaty of October 27 1795
883
Treaty of February 22 1819
884
Convention of February 17 1834
885
Reciprocity agreement 1891
886
Treaty of December 10 1898
887
Caroline Islands
888
Sweden and Norway
889
Switzerland
890
Tahiti
891
Tonga
892
Treaties of 1824 and 1825
893
Venezuela
894
Zanzibar
895
Multipartite treaties
896
Political intervention 1 General principles
897
Policy of nonintervention 1 Declarations of policy
898
2 The French revolution
899
3 Spain and her colonies
900
4 Greek independence
901
5 Hungarian revolution
902
6 ChilePeruvian war
903
7 Sympathy with liberal political struggles
904
8 Hospitality to political refugees
905
Good offices
911
Questions of asvium
916
1 By contract
918
Early expressions of American policy
927
2 Regulation of procedure 187
930
VESSELS 174
931
Monroes message December 2 1823
936
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Էջ 576 - Article XI. Canada acceding to this Confederation, and joining in the measures of the United States, shall be admitted into and entitled to all the advantages of this union; but no other colony shall he admitted into the same, unless such admission lie agreed to by nine States.
Էջ 453 - continued westward along the 49th parallel of north latitude "to the middle of the channel which separates the continent from Vancouver's Island; and thence southerly through the middle of the said channel, and of Fuca's Straits, to the Pacific Ocean: Provided, however, that the navigation of the whole of the said channel and straits, south of the
Էջ 519 - Third. On similar grounds the United States is entitled to occupy, and will hold the city, bay, and harbor of Manila pending the conclusion of a treaty of peace which shall determine the control, disposition, and government of the Philippines. " If the terms hereby offered are accepted in their entirety, commissioners will
Էջ 775 - for the purpose of shelter and of repairing damages therein, of purchasing wood, and of obtaining water, and for no other purpose whatever. But they shall be under such restrictions as may be necessary to prevent their taking, drying or curing fish therein, or in any other manner whatever abusing the privileges hereby reserved to them.
Էջ 762 - of every kind, on the Grand Bank, and on all the other banks of Newfoundland; also in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and in all other places, where the inhabitants of both countries used at any time heretofore to fish," and that the citizens of the United States should
Էջ 303 - article of the treaty contains the following provision: 'The inhabitants of the territories which His Catholic Majesty cedes to the United States by this treaty shall be incorporated in the Union of the United States as soon as may be consistent with the principles of the Federal Constitution, and admitted to the enjoyment of the
Էջ 285 - The Government of Spain hereby relinquishes all claim of sovereignty over and title to Cuba. "The Government of Spain hereby cedes to the United States the Island of Porto Rico and other islands now under Spanish sovereignty in the West Indies, and also the Island of Guam, in the Ladrones.
Էջ 412 - that the inhabitants should be "maintained and protected in the free enjoyment of their liberty, property, and the religion which they profess.'' Stipulations for >the protection of rights of property may also be found in other treaties by which the United States
Էջ 463 - IV. With reference to the line of demarcation laid down in the preceding Article, it is understood: 1st. That the Island called Prince of Wales Island shall belong wholly to Russia. 2d. That wherever the summit of the mountains which extend in a direction parallel to the Coast, from the 5(>th degree of
Էջ 33 - The rights of the original inhabitants were in no instance entirely disregarded, but were necessarily, to a considerable extent, impaired. They were admitted to be the rightful occupants of the soil, with a legal as well as just claim to retain possession of it, and to use it according to their own discretion; but,

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