Page images
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

201
104
191
38
26

12)
1981
151

62

51
185
41
81
72
57
165
25
68
101
143
73
75

501
1931
46
80
166

57
171
25
74
1881
149

[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]

174

254
1621
381

54]
1941
42
831

5
58
174

20
78
169
146
771
86
86
71
114

48
145
142

84
170
117
275

64
128)

56
38
87
831

[ocr errors]

64
111

48
137
127

78
181
116
258

64
115
159

73

361
78
32

14, 129 21 8 14 535 Gallatin Nathaniel P. Holderby New Market. 3, 752 109

35
Greene Caleb A. Worley. Carrollton ....

31 3 3 75
Grundy ..... Hiram C. Gould.

26 2 4 150
Hamilton George B. Robinson McLeansboro

3 1
Hancock... Rev. William Griffin. Carthage

2510 7 240
Hardin .....
John Jack
Elizabethtown 2,179

14
Henderson R. P. Randall

Olena ......
4,396 1

38 Henry Henry S. Comstock Cambridge.

11, 408 20 711 56 Iroquois L. T. Hewins ...... Oakolla.

8, 416 48

4 145 Jackson John Ford

153

150
Jasper....... P. S. McLaughlin Newton

4

35 Jefferson. George W. Johnson. Mt. Vernon

11 1

143 Jersey Charies H. Knapp.. Jerseyville..

5, 777
291 3

66
Jo Daviess. George W. Pepoon.

32 7 7 549
Johnson Richard M. Fisher Vienna

4, 787 21 1
Kane
George B. Charles..
Aurora

81

4

413 Kankakee Rev. Fred. W. Beecher Kankakee

7, 990 13 2 11 410
Kendall. John R. Marshall Yorkville

4, 231 10 6 1 55
Knox ... Frederick Christianer. Abingdon. 13, 598 189 11 5
Lake
Byron L. Carr

8, 574 27 5 16 1,011
La Salle George S. Wedgewood La Salle

21, 146 16 17 18 1, 148
Lawrence. Ozias V. Smith.. Lawrenceville

99
Leo
James H. Preston. Amboy

7 6 4 145
Livingston.. H. H. Hill

22 6 8 203
Logan
Levi T. Regan
Lincoln

191 2 1 20
Macon
Oscar F. McKim

7, 760 62 8 5 194
Macoupin. Fletcher H. Chapman.

10, 624 75 21 17 370) Madison John Weaver

12, 659 657 10 24 1,157 Marion James McHaney.

51 6 6 200 Marshall John Peck

Henry 5, 894 8

2 165
Mason
Henry H. Moose

136 1 2 55
McDonough.. Lloyd H. Copeland. Bushnell

17 10 6 396
McHenry Gardner S. Southworth Woodstock 8, 111 15 8 6 240
McLean... John Hull.

Bloomington .. 16, 224 109 34 5 252)
Menard William H. Berry

3, 636 3 1 4 116)
Mercer Fred. W. Livingston. Keithsburg

6

60 Monroe Joseph W. Rickert. Waterloo

330 Montgomery Rev. Hiram L. Gregory Irving

9, 041 48 4

293
Morgan Samuel M. Martin.. Jacksonville

151 9
Moultrie David F. Stearns Sullivan
Ogle
Edward L. Wells Oregon

9, 205 37

117 Peoria N. E. Worthington Peoria

28 361

450
Perry
B. G. Roots
Tamaroa.

81

76 Piatt Caleb A. Tatman

3, 518 1

70 Pike John N. Dewell.

10,997 27

87 Pope. Theodoro Steyer

112

41 Pulaski James H. Brown. Mound City

1, 739 263

120 Putnam. James S. McClung Hennepin.

2, 175 16. Randolph Robert P. Thompson

Chester 6,385 195 21

1181

89
71
119

481
144
139

81
1921
1121
2781

64
1381
1771
102
124
159
123
106
78
86
35

200

150
45
81 637
761 502
57 11
1731

858
26
691

143

556
145 731
80 1351
741
87
651 958
119 1, 153
48
141 2, 739
133 920

75 737
198) 1,878
116 1, 403
282 2,317

651 65.
140 705
173 1,216
105
101 221
166 398
124 1,560
94 243
831 293
86
34
148 100

716
221 74

57 550
100 494

47
108
108 018

58 209
170 2,070
155 442
58

160
61 65
148 292
52 16
26
34 099)
88 161

194)

65
349

68
139
155

76
317

36
136
374
249

99
130
120
111
224

55
346
226
153
411
237
574
104
241
312
174
204
278
219
188
190
118

48
283
294
400
105
190

60
183
208
107
346
300

95

6,425 007 1,587 3, 594 531
30, 6807, 656 7, 154 14, 8100 151
6, 400 1, 4171 1, 1871 2, 604 53
12, 946 2, 892 2, 577 6, 469 77
13, 760 2,839 2,501 5,340 55

6, 943 2, 463 1,972 4,435 66
23, 737 6, 005 5,172 11, 177 144

3, 100 685 583 1, 268 29
11, 185 1,978 1, 842 3, 820 67
28, 951 7,333 6, 489 13, 822 1171
52, 279 3, 958)

3, 448 7, 406 87
9, 614 2, 038 2, 038 4, 444 61
10, 417 2, 384 2,

4, 538 75
11, 393 3, 083 2, 576 5, 659 88
13, 295 2, 217 2,031

4, 248 60
19, 463 4,774 4,2108,984 69

5, 978 2, 020 1,549 3,569 50 31, 692 5,826 514 11, 340 84 21, 441 4, 818

4, 838 9, 656
13, 913 2, 541

2, 324 4, 865 52|
70, 645 6,998 6,217 13, 215 144)
17, 110 3,749 3, 206 6,955 731
52, 6530 9, 2009, 277 18, 557 197

8,711 2, 080 1, 817 3,897 601
30, 313
4, 73

546 9,284 81
24, 364 5,092 4,792 9,884 118
17, 834 3,370 2, 940 6, 310 92
19, 247

3, 484 7, 505 99
27, 321 5, 275 4, 396 9, 671

1591
23, 675 5, 240 4, 554 9,794 110
16,033 3, 925 3,598 7, 523 87
17,740 3,010 2, 6975, 707 57
12, 050 2,311 2,238 4, 549 52

4, 941 1, 240 1, 108 2, 384 28
22, 786 5,333

9,970
25, 075 3, 967 3, 612 7,579 89
47, 707 7, 779 6, 485 14, 284 166

9,975 1, 802 1, 333 3, 135 62
15, 832 2,892 2, 552 5, 444 85
7,077 1,346 1,083 2, 429

51
14,555 3, 478 3, 566 7, 044 92
17, 089 4, 143 3, 734 7, 877

8,844 2,570 1, 642 4,212 60
25, 939 4, 264 3, 535 7, 799 115
23, 0845, 698 5, 192 10, 890 1CO
8,976: 2, 215 1, 923 4,138 50
9, 683 1,849

1, 508 3, 357
23, 266 5, 524 4,952 10, 476
6,698 1,712 1,279 2,991

323 690 696 1, 386 6, 493

1, 088 915 2, 003 11, 242 2,565 2,0501 4, 6151 58

86

4, 021

[ocr errors]

32
51
155

5
2621
153
101
267)
164)
377)

44
160
1941

82
105)
119

881
101
133
66

20
164
205
234

38
1101

9
91
106

[ocr errors]

6
1
1

120

30
60
29
13
31
39)
07
76
19
331
30
25

617

119

100
101
1621
1171
1151
901
88
36
143
164
237

56)
104)

51
113
109

71
181
157
58
66
155
521
27
33
85

100
158
114
110
65
81

35
140
164
215

54
100
50
102
106
64
165
153

1581

229

1
1
11
31
3
8

102

47

164 221

57
101

47
106
107
65
169
179
57
62
157
53
27
33

75
43

58

42

[ocr errors]

5, 426 5, 489

6, 106 4, 520 6,348

11, 025

11, 861

Franklin Robert R. Link

Benton

5, 1071 Fulton Horatio J. Benton Lewistown....

6, 238

Morris ......

13, 029

Murphysboro.

Warren.

Waukegan..

4, 919

9, 159

Pontiac

Decatur

Carlinville

Edwardsville

Salem...

Havana

4, 889 Massac William H. Scott Metropolis.

Petersburg

Monticello

Pittsfield

Golconda

9, 675 7, 045

7,899

3, 390 9, 690

6, 924 5, 152

9, 843 4, 290

15, 300 4, 377

4, 498

231
213
31
(5)
1431
14
191
541
461

60
152
50
26
33
85

127
203
67
39
75
104

[blocks in formation]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]

Table of statistical details of the schools of Illinois, fc.-Continued.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

INDIANA.

The fourth biennial report of the superintendent of public instruction, Hon. Barnabas C. Hobbs, for 1867—8, contains the following information:

1867.

1868. Whole number of children between six and twenty-one years of age.

577, 007 591, 661 Number of pupils attending public schools.

415,796 436, 736 In primary schools..

405, 631 425, 745 In high schools...

10, 165

10,991 Average daily attendance in primary schools.

259, 224 275, 745 Average daily attendance in high schools.

6,998

7,595 Average length of schools in days.

80

87 Number of teachers employed.

10,053

10, 698 Male teachers..

6,012

6, 462 Female teachers..

4,041

4,236 Average monthly compensation of male teachers in primary schools....

$36 80

$37 00 Average monthly compensation of female teachers in primary schools...

$29 00

$28 40 Of male teachers in high schools.

$69 40

$64 00 Of female teachers in high schools.

$37 40

$42 00 Average monthly cost of tuition per pupil.

$1 18

$1 20 Amount expended for tuition....

$1,262, 684 54 $1, 474, 832 49 Number of school-houses built within the year.

364

424 Total value of school property...

$5,078, 356 00 $5,828, 501 00 Total number of school-houses in the State.

8, 360

8, 403 Amount paid trustees for managing educational matters. $38, 995 80 $43, 598 39 Amount of special school revenue expended within the year..

$854, 761 55 $1,050, 139 03 Total school revenue from all sources.

$1,566, 507 58 Total expended for schools during 1869...

$1, 474, 000 00

The State educational fund is made up of the
Negotiable State bonds...
Common school fund held by counties.
Congressional township fund.
Value of unsold congressional township lands.
Saline fund on loan...
Saline fund in treasury
Bank tax fund on loan..
Bank tax fund in treasury
Escheated estates...
Sinking fund...

Total...

$3, 591, 316 15 1,522, 410 38 2,211, 867 76 101, 502 25

3,727 07 1,348 90 1, 396 99

107 07 16,702 42 808, 963 35

$8,259, 342 34

The constitution of the State makes it incumbent upon the legislature to provide "a general and uniform system of common schools, wherein tuition shall be without charge, and equally open to all." “We cannot,” says the superintendent, “avoid the grave consideration that there is a large colored population in the State, who have ħitherto submitted patiently to the ordeal of adverse public sentiment and the force of our statutes, in being denied participation in the benefits of our public school funds, while, at the same time, no bar can be discovered to their natural and constitutional right to these."

“ Colored citizens, while hitherto deprived of their natural and constitutional rights, have been subject to the special school tax for township purposes in common with white citizens, and have thus paid their proportion of expense for building school-houses for white children. After being denied all privilege to the school funds, and thus taxed, they have been under the necessity of levying on themselves an additional tax to build their own school-houses, and for the entire cost of their tuition.”

[ocr errors]

INDIANA STATE UNIVERSITY.

This institution is located at Bloomington. President, Cyrus Nutt, D. D., professor of moral, mental, and political philosophy. The whole number of students in the four college classes is 192. In the department of the theory and practice of teaching, 30; in preparatory studies, 12; in the law department, 21; in modern languages, 6. Total

in attendance, 249. The number of professors is 10; number of tutors, 3. Three new departments have been opened this year, viz., modern languages, the theory and practice of teaching, and military science.

Tuition was made free for all the students in the State University, by the action of the trustees, in 1860. Every yonng man and maiden has a perpetual scholarship, which entitles them to free tuition in their own State university.

INDIANA ASHBURY UNIVERSITY. Located at Greencastle, about forty miles west of Indianapolis. Thomas Bowman, D. D., president, and professor of moral and mental science. This institution has a permanent endowment fund of over $100,000, which is constantly increasing. The libraries of the college reach an aggregate of 10,000 volumes. It has a good apparatus for chemical experiments, a fine achomatic telescope, polarizing apparatus, meteorological, electrical, magnetical, and optical apparatus of the most approved forms, and a good cabinet. Expenses of board and tuition from $200 to $300 per annum. This institution, the superintendent states, deserves a more extended notice, but no reports have been received from the faculty, therefore further information is lacking.

WABASH COLLEGE.

This institution was chartered in 1834. President, Joseph F. Tuttle, professor of moral and intellectual philosophy. The college has given more or less instruction to more than 2,000 students, and has graduated 105. The present attendance is 162; in college proper, 66; in preparatory department, 96.

The college was chartered as Wabash College and Teachers' Seminary, and has always done much to foster common school education.

Permanent funds invested, $100,000, from which and tuition fees is realized about the sum of $12,000 annually. A low estimate of the buildings, $35,000. It has a beautiful campus of 25 acres of native forest trees, which cannot be estimated in dollars. It has other property which may be estimated at $50,000. Library numbers over 10,000 volumes.

NORTHWESTERN CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY. Situated near the northwest limits of the city of Indianapolis. Was founded in 1850 by a joint-stock company. Stock amounts to more than $152,000, controlled by a board of twenty-one directors. Endowment, $100,000, upon which interest is accruing to the amount of $6,000 annually. The president is 0. A. Burgess, A. M., professor of biblical literature. The session is nine months, divided into three terms. Pupils, exclusive of the music department and the primary school, number 160. The number of professors and teachers is 8. The course of study is thorough, requiring two years in the preparatory department, and four in the college proper.

EARLHAM COLLEGE.

Located one mile west of Richmond. President Joseph Moore, M. S. Number of pupils, 174; ladies, 76; gentlemen, 98. Number of professors and teachers, 12. Course of study, preparatory or academical and collegiate. It has a good cabinet of natural history, mathematical, philosophical, and chemical apparatus, and libraries containing about 3,000 volumes. In its observatory are a good mounted telescope, and a transit instrument in good condition, with a sidereal clock. It has been a college proper about nine years. It has a campus of about 160 acres, handsomely laid out in groves, orchards, fields, garden, lawn, &c., and is under the management of the Indiana Yearly Meeting of the Society of Friends. The number of alumni is 39.

UNION CHRISTIAN COLLEGE. Located at Merom, Sullivan County; incorporated in 1859; opened for the admission of students in 1860. President, Thomas Holmes. Endowment fund, $110,000. Value of property, $€5,000. Students in attendance within the last year, 109; number of alumni, 4; number of volumes in college library, 300; number of faculty and teachers, 7. Ladies pursue the same course of study, are subject to the same regulations, enjoy the same privileges, and receive the same honors, as gentlemen. The courses of study are, academic, classical, and scientific, omitting the dead languages. There is a commercial and music department. The location is reported healthy and beautiful; students orderly and industrious, and methods of instruction thorough and efficient.

BROOKVILLE COLLEGE. Located at Brookville, on the White Water Valley railroad, forty miles from Cincinnati. Under the control of the Methodist Episcopal Church. President, J. H. Martin, A. M.

The course of instruction is classical and scientific, collegiate and preparatory. The classical course requires four years; the scientific, three. "It has a normal, a commercial, and a music department. Its normal conrse is designed to equal the course required by the State board of education for applicants for State certificates for teaching. The institution is in a prosperous condition, and out of debt.

INSTITUTION FOR THE DEAF AND DUMB.

Located at Indianapolis. Thomas MacIntiro, M. D., superintendent. Number of pupils during the past year..

209 Number in attendance.

186 Number of instructors.

10 Number of volumes in library

2,034 Value of chemical and philosophical apparatus.

$800 Annual cost of instruction per pupil.

$45 Total annual expenses per pupil.

$240 Probable number of deaf-mutes in the State.

1,200 Probable number of school age..

400 Cabinet-making, boot and shoe making, tailoring, and mantua-making are carried on for the benefit of pupils who wish to learn those trades. The institute is in a prosperous condition in all departments, except that the accommodations are not sufficient.

INDIANA INSTITUTE FOR THE EDUCATION OF THE BLIND.

Founded in 1847. Superintendent, William Churchman. Number of pupils enrolled during the year was 126; males, 57; females, 69. Of this number 21 have left as graduates, either of the school or work department; 13 being young men who had obtained a thorough knowledge of the broom-making business, and several of them had learned other branches of handicraft.

The whole number of pupils received into the institution since its foundation is exhibited in the following: Number received...

365 Males...

195 Females.

170 Totally blind.

171 Partially blind.

194 Born blind....

137 Blind through accident.

40 Blind through disease..

188 Number whose parents were blood relations.

44

REFORM SCHOOL AT PLAINFIELD.

This “House of Refuge for juvenile offenders" is located near the village of Plainfield, on a farm of 223 acres. Since the purchase of the farm, in 1867, there have been three family buildings erected on it, 38 by 56 feet in extent, with two stories and basement. Two of these buildings are occupied by the boys. The first inmate was received on the 28th of January of the current year, and there are now in attendance 108 boys, 54 in each family building. Each family is divided in two classes, all of whom attend school one-half of each day, and are detailed for work the other half. Most of the boys can read print quite intelligibly, and nearly all the larger boys can write and cipher some. Cost of the buildings, including a work-shop 40 by 80 feet, about $30,000.Nearly all boys take a deep interest in their studies, and seem anxious to improve their advantages.

EDUCATION IN STATE PRISONS.

In response to letters of inquiry, addressed to officers of the State prisons, north and south, the superintendent has received information from those in the south' that “the law providing for the mental culture of the convicts is not carried out at present, at least not according to the letter." There is no organized school, yet the education of the prisoners is not quite overlooked. All who desire it are furnished with schoolbooks, slates, and writing-books. Both the prisons, north and south, report a great lack of books in the library; that of the south having been in use so long that the books are quite worn out, and in that of the State prison north, there is not even a supply of Bibles to firnish every man a copy, according to law.

« ՆախորդըՇարունակել »