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The number of children in the State, between the ages of six and twenty-one, in 1868, was 592,876. The whole amount appropriated to the several counties was $1,414,614 02.

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IOWA. The superintendent of public instruction, Hon. A. S. Kissell, in his report for 1990, gives the following statistics:

Increase for

the year. Number of district townships in 1869..........

1, 462

50 Number of sub-districts..........

6,773

363 Number of persons between the ages of five and twentyone; males, 215,812 ; females, 202,356......

418, 168 24,538 Number of schools......

6, 788

349 Number of graded schools.....

221 Number of pupils attending school........

296, 138 17, 131 Average attendance..

178, 329 17,556 Number of teachers employed : males, 4,479; females, 7,515...

11, 994 1, 025 Average compensation of male teachers per week........

$9 24 $0 41 Average compensation of female teachers per week ......

6 79

0 37 Average number of months of school......

6.6

0.2 Aggregate amount paid teachers....

$1,438,964 04 $108, 140 51 Number of school-houses : brick, 527, stone, 229; frame, 5,192; log, 459....

6, 407

407 Value of school-houses.....

..................... $5, 295, 364 45 $977, 075 43 Amount of district tax for building and purch'g grounds. 919, 366 52 29,785 45 Amount of district tax for repairing and furnishing ...... 250, 802 96 28, 924 53 Amount of district tax for library and apparatus......... 22,518 08 Amount of district tax for rent of school buildings....... 13, 665 63 Amount of district tax for fuel.....

150, 648 56 16, 239 93 Amount of district tax for pay of secretary and treasurer. 50, 870 96 6,036 30 Amount of district tax for teacher's fund....

1, 106, 040 21 251, 002 14 Apportionment of temporary school fund ..........

35, 987 21 Number of volumes in school district libraries

8,932

156 Value of school apparatus.

$79,178 05

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001 TU

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In this State every civil township is a school district, and is divided by the trustees into sub-districts. Each district holds an annual meeting, elects a chairman and secretary, decides by vote upon the purchase and sale of sites and school-houses, branches to be taught in schools, &c.; they have power to vote a tax pot exceeding five mills on a dollar of valuation for school purposes.

The sub-districts hold annual meetings, choose officers called sub-directors, who constitute a board of district directors, with corporate powers to fix the sites of school-houses and establish schools, make estimates of money necessary to keep school the legal term of twenty-four weeks, and certify the amount to the board of supervisors, which board causes such tax to be levied and collected. Each sub-director has charge of the school affairs of his district, hires teachers, reports to the board, &c.

There is a county superintendent elected for two years, whose duty it is to examino and license teachers, visit and supervise schools, &c.

There is a superintendent of public instruction elected by the people for two years, who is charged with a general supervision of all the county superintendents and all the common schools of the State.

The school revenue is derived from lands granted to the United States for schools, the 500,000 acres granted by Congress to new States, all escheats, percentage on sales of land in the State, money paid for exemption from military duty, and fines for breach of penal laws. The school fund is under the control of the general assembly.

The school fund is not accumulating as its friends could wish. Its investments have been largely made in such a manner that annual losses will always be likely to occur, 80 long as the present system of investment exists. The proper steps should be taken to avoid this annual loss to the fund, as well as of the annual interest, the loss of which was $34,745 41 greater in 1869 than in 1868.

As the school laws make it the duty of boards of directors to manage school funds and property, one of their leading qualifications, next to integrity, should be business ability." Bnt it is a notable fact that persons are often chosen for these positions without any reference to financial ability, or even common prudence. In 1859 the existing school property was valued at $1,213,454 94. There has been raised since that time, by

taxation, for building school-houses and purchasing apparatus, $4,378,074 09. This would givo, in 1869, $5,591,529 03. But the estimate, according to returns this year, gives only $3,374,542 50 as the value of school property, a difference of $216,986 53.

It is earnestly recommended that a State normal school be established at an early day. At the last meeting of the State Teachers' Association a unanimous vote way given to memorialize the legislature on the subject. The people feel the need of the school, and are ready for the appropriation of the requisite funds.

Much importance is attached to the training in music which is given in many of the graded schools. The old practice of rote singing is discarded, and "Blackman's Graded Songs" have been introduced. These lessons are so simplified and graded that the youngest child can understand them.

In some of the larger towns of the State evening schools have been organized, and are efficiently conducted under the supervision of the boards of these school districts, and are supported out of the common school fund. They are attended by mechanics, apprentices, female domestics, both native and foreigu born, and other classes of the people who are debarred from the day-school, and no scholars connected with the schools are found so eager as these to learn. It is urged that the facilities for these schools should be increased, and that they should be extended throughout the State.

There are 53 colleges and academies in the State, with 4,728 students attending, and 72 private and denominational schools, with 4,200 pupils. The number of teachers employed in colleges, academies, and private schools is 312.

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Table of statistical details of schools in Iowa-Continued.

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Emmett.
Fayette..
Forld...
Franklin...
Fromont..
Greene.
Grundy..
Guthrie..
Haurilton
Hancock....
Hardin ...
Harrison..
Henry ...
Howard ..
Humboldt
Ida ....
lowa ....
Tackson ..
Jasper
Jefferson
Johnson ...
Jones.....
Keokak.
Kossuth
Leo....
Linn.
Louisa..
Lucas ....
Madison ..
Mahaska.
Marion ...

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1. Mitchell...

Monona.....
Monroe.....
Montgomery..
Muscatine..
O'Brien ...
Page...
Palo Alto...
Plymonth...
Pocahontas.
Polk....
Potawatamie
Poweshiek..
Ringgold ...
Sao....
Scott..
Shelby.
Sioux..
Story ...
Tama....
Taylor....
Union ....
Van Buren..
Wapello ....
Warren....
Washington
Wayne ...
Webster .....
Winnebago.
Winneshiek
Woodbury
Worth....
Wright.....

Total...... 527

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